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The Cactus Leaguer

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Hammerhead

Hammerhead (1/8)

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  1. Oh, and I forgot to mention - the Brewers attendance at Maryvale stinks... but yes, the park is nice, the neighborhood isn't.
  2. I don't see the brewers moving anytime soon - the park in maryvale is pretty nice, even if the neighborhood isn't - plus they draw pretty well with all the midwestern people who continually move down here I don't either, but out of all the teams, they would be the most likely with their combination of geography, facility, and their lease being up sooner. Actually I could see the Rockies moving as well out of Hi-Corbett at some point but not out of AZ (maybe Tucson Electric to replace the White Sox when they leave, or to Goodyear to join the Tribe). But this is all just guessing on my part. The real mystery is what will Reds do... then you may see dominoes start to fall.
  3. It could be the Reds heading to Vero Beach... their funding proposal to renovate their stadium in Sarasota fell apart recently. I think the Pirates are on track with their stadium upgrades (including lights), so I don't know if they plan to move or even if they can with their lease. Personally I think the Reds should join the Indians in Goodyear, but then you'd either need another team to move back to Florida (Brewers?), or another team would have to migrate to AZ with the Reds. Whatever happens, they need to save Dodgertown - that's a national treasure.
  4. I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing. The push for downtown was more of an MLB than a Marlins thing (at least early on). So maybe MLB is backing off of that, and perhaps moving to OB (if the deal is done right) will not cause the Marlins to decrease their contribution. One other thing under discussion has been the creation of a "G3"-type fund like the NFL has to float low interest loans to teams in need of stadia. Note this is a loan, not MLB kicking in cash per se. The loans would have future media revenues (which are massive and will continue to be massive in the foreseeable future) as collateral. This could help to enable the deal. I'm not sure if MLB is ready to roll out their version of a G3 fund, but I know it's under discussion. For your guys' sake, I hope the meeting today goes well.
  5. My assumption was that the stadium would be completely enclosed when the roof is shut (unlike Safeco, but like Minute Maid and Chase)... just wondering if the emphasis on views is that critical since none of the completely enclosed stadiums that I have been to offered decent skyline views. They have solid walls extending upwards all the way around so that the AC has a chance to work. Safeco has a decent view of downtown but that's because of the open space in left field beginning at the top of the left field bleachers. If I'm wrong on any of this, please clarify... thanks.
  6. i think thats the only problem i have with a downtown ballpark. yes there will be plenty to do afterward but people seem to love to drive everywhere and with a downtown park there is a limit to the amount of parking. Actually that's one of the advantages of building ballparks in downtown locations --- lots of parking garages that would otherwise be empty on nights and weekends when the games are being played... and as a bonus, you don't have to blow a boatload of $$$ on new parking garages or chew up vast seas of land for surface parking. (again, this is a general rule --- every stadium situation is different)
  7. Forgive my stupidity in asking this, but isn't the issue funding, rather than site location? I'm not saying that the site ISN'T an issue, just not THE issue right now. I thought the whole opportunity with the Canes moving to DS was that it could possibly free up some funds that would otherwise have gone to renovations and/or maintenance of the Orange Bowl. On a side note, I'm wondering how much the "+1" proposals are going to end up impacting you guys in South Florida. I'm sure that Dallas and Phoenix will be rolling out the red carpet in an effort to host that game every year. Who knows, maybe even Indianapolis and a few others will try to get in the act with their shiny new climate controlled football stadia.
  8. You're not going to have any facilty built over railroad tracks or highways, or streets passing underneath for the obvious (terrorist) security issues in today's world. Really? I don't recall this being an issue with the West Side Stadium proposal in New York (of all places)... and that would have been built over rail yards. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Side_Stadium
  9. San Antonio and Portland would (and will, IMO, in 5-10 years) make viable small markets (Vegas and Orlando are not viable for reasons discussed ad nauseam here and elsewhere). South Florida, on the other hand, is a viable midsize market in a strategic location. MLB is very strong financially, and MLB is very patient when it comes to stadiums (look at how long it took the Twins). The Marlins aren't going anywhere, yet. They have at least a five year window to get an agreement in place before anything resembling a viable alternative exists. "We miss field goals in the dirt"? BFD. So do your opponents. Does he honestly think that comment is going to scare the city into making a deal?
  10. The roof adds $100m to the cost. Yeah land in the SF Bay Area is more expensive, but is it really that much more than downtown Miami (I trust that Marlins2003 and other insiders know the answer to that one better than I do)? I think that $490m is optimistic, and the people at the negotiating table know it. That's why they are quibbling over $30m, because the reality is that there is a fair to good likelihood that the stadium will go over budget and someone (ownership according to the most recent published reports, which I still find hard to believe) will get stuck with the bill. What all of you seem to forget is that the $490M price tag for the stadium down here DOES NOT INCLUDE THE REAL ESTATE/LAND PURCHASE PRICE/VALUE OF LAND. That is because they would be using property that already belongs to the City of Miami or Miami-Dade County. If we were talking about private land or land that needed to be condemned, then the price tag would skyrocket and probably, then, you could compare the prices of the stadium here with the stadium in Fremont equally. Until then, the Fremont price tag probably includes land, while the Marlins price tag does not. Actually you are raising a good point that I forgot to check on. The A's already bought the land (226 acres for $500 million according to Barry Witt, or $2.21 million per acre). The $450 million price tag for the stadium in Fremont is for the stadium cost alone, not the land.
  11. The roof adds $100m to the cost. Yeah land in the SF Bay Area is more expensive, but is it really that much more than downtown Miami (I trust that Marlins2003 and other insiders know the answer to that one better than I do)? I think that $490m is optimistic, and the people at the negotiating table know it. That's why they are quibbling over $30m, because the reality is that there is a fair to good likelihood that the stadium will go over budget and someone (ownership according to the most recent published reports, which I still find hard to believe) will get stuck with the bill.
  12. Wolff is one of the rookie owners. He is still learning, he's never owned a team before. Wolff may be a "rookie" owner, but if there is any owner in MLB who can pull this off, it's him. Also, he has been sowing the seeds for this for years... he had an option to purchase the team for a time and he used all of that time on due diligence for this stadium proposal. Believe me - you guys would love to have an owner like Wolff. He does he work behind the scenes, he doesn't alienate the fanbase by playing footsie with other cities, etc. And he takes zero credit for the Moneyball success engineered by Billy Beane - he just stays out of the way. Cape - I'm not trying to be confrontation here, but dismissing Wolff as a rookie owner who's still learning is quite shortsighted IMO.
  13. Orlando has only ONE valid argument for getting an MLB team - total personal income (TPI). Orlando has a higher amount of TPI available to support an MLB franchise than any of the other contenders (unless you consider 3rd franchises in LA or NY a possibility, and most insiders don't). Personally I think the TPI numbers are inflated in Orlando due to the influx of super-rich people who call the Orlando area "home" for tax reasons, but nonetheless it's there (statistically). But if you look at it from any other angle (metro size, TV market, competition, etc.) Orlando does not stack up as well as the other contenders, and it's not even close to Miami. The "tourist" myth has already been debunked so I won't even go there. And the arguments about no D-Ray fans in Orlando? Meaningless. There were no Mariner fans in Portland either when the team sucked for the first 20 years of their existence. But when the team got good and the stadium became great, everyone in town became a Mariners fan.
  14. ''It would not go up at all during construction,'' (Samson) said. ``Our contribution is so large, and we're responsible for overruns.'' Holy smokes. I hope the final cost estimates end up conservative, otherwise you might end up getting a "value engineered" (read: cheap) stadium. Samson said getting state money ($60 million from a sales tax rebate) remains ''critical.'' The Marlins, who have increased their contribution above $210 million, appear to have a decent chance after five failed attempts in Tallahassee. There were several regulars in here who were ripping my head off last year for even hinting that state funding may be necessary. So to you I say this: The good news is I think you have a great shot at it this time. I agree with all the people who are saying that Samson needs to have someone else handle his PR. That was almost as bad as Terrell Owens' ex-publicist.
  15. I fully expect that any moment now the Dave Hyde's of the world will start dropping hints about Huizenga's new offer to share Dolphin Stadium, or maybe adjoining land becoming available again or suggesting the Marlins aren't paying their fair share, or the red herring that "we need new schools and books not new stadiums for the rich..." etc., as Wayne's PR machine kicks into gear across the state to try and derail funding in Talahassee. It isn't a matter of "if", it's a matter of "when". Well it sounds like you guys have the key politicos on your side now, so I doubt if the PR campaign will work.
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