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More on Jeff Allison

Teal Shadow

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Growing up in the shadows of the Red Sox, Allison said he is thrilled to go to the Marlins.

"I was actually more excited than people thought I'd be," Allison said. "The Marlins are a really, really good organization. I think in a couple of years, they will be a team really good to look at. If I make it to the Major Leagues, I think I will have an impact with this team. Right now, they have some young pitchers on the team, which is a good thing. They have come out of high school. I think it was a really good thing for them to take me."


http://florida.marlins.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/...t=.jsp&c_id=flo
 

Wild Card

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"...I think it was a really good thing for them to take me."
Me too Jeff....Me too....
 
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I think its good that they drafted someone who really wanted to be with the team as much as he did. :D
 

Teal Shadow

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more on the draft:

http://florida.marlins.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/...t=.jsp&c_id=flo


"Kensing, meanwhile, fires a 94-96 mph fastball"

Kensing gives the organization some college experience.

Marlins outfielder Chad Allen, who attended Texas A&M, has high praise for Kensing. Allen, a Texas native, often works out at Texas A&M in the offseason. He has batted against Kensing.

"He has a big-league fastball," Allen said. "He has a good slider and a live arm."

Kensing is a 6-foot-1, 185-pounder. Allen says when he fills out to about 200-pounds, he could become even harder to hit.

In college, Kensing started and also closed out games. The Marlins project him as a starter, who has the ability to relieve.

Allen discussed Kensing with Fleming before the draft.
 

Ramp

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so, we're going to start Allison out in Jupiter or.....?
rookie ball Jamestown prob

we need to sign him first :plain
 

Teal Shadow

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I found this from one scouts view on Allison stuff

Breaking ball
#1 Jeff Allison has one of the more impressive curves I?ve seen in the high school game. He throws it hard (78-80 MPH) and with very impressive command when he?s in mid-season form. It doesn?t have a big break, but it?s enough to get punchouts as a power curve.

Fastball
1#Allison gets the edge because he has the best combination of stuff, size, durability, and polish. Not that Hughes or Manship(other top pitchers) are slouches in the other departments, but Allison is extremely well-rounded. Perhaps Josh Beckett is the only more polished pitcher I?ve seen at the same age.

I liken Allison?s style more to Mark Prior with his delivery, his hard curveball, and his command of the strike zone. Of course, he has a ways to develop before he?s of that caliber but he?s actually ahead of Prior by a considerable amount at the same age. I didn?t see Prior in high school, but I?ve read reports and asked around.

http://teamonebaseball.rivals.com/content.....asp?CID=174927

here's a story about the kid

*I liken Allison?s style more to Mark Prior with his delivery, his hard curveball, and his command of the strike zone. Of course, he has a ways to develop before he?s of that caliber but he?s actually ahead of Prior by a considerable amount at the same age. I didn?t see Prior in high school, but I?ve read reports and asked around.

While most college baseball teams have already played at least 10-15 games this Spring and the high school season in the South began weeks ago ? the best high school pitcher in America is waiting for his turn.
Jeff Allison of Peabody (MA) High School will begin his season Monday, April 7th. Pre-season practice didn?t even begin until yesterday.

Even with its? usual early April start, the weather is often challenging to high school baseball teams in the Boston area. Last year, for example, Allison only made one start when the weather was above 50 degrees.

Despite the cold weather, Allison shows the rare combination of a power fastball (often in the 93-95 MPH range) and pinpoint control. During his sophomore year he struck out 113 batters and walked just six. Last year, with the really bad weather, he still maintained a superlative 74:8 strikeout to walk ratio.

The scouting report on Allison is this: athletic, repeats his delivery very well, shows both two and four-seam fastballs in the low to mid-90s, his breaking ball is a slurve thrown in the low-80s, and he has an emerging circle changeup that he throws mostly in the summer time. Allison rarely shows the change, if at all, during the high school season because its? velocity (high 70s) is similar to most fastballs in his area.

The University of Arizona signee has a chance to be an early first-round pick in a few months. Teams have been coming in to speak with Allison and his family throughout the winter. Some have even attended his basketball games.

Scouts use this time to get to know the player and his family with the primary goals of determining signability and getting to know the personalities involved - of both the prospect and his family.

This winter onne team asked Allison, ?Where do you think you should be drafted and why?? Not the easiest question for a high school senior to answer ? but part of the landscape that comes with being a top prospect.

Think about that question for a moment. No matter how a prospect answers it, a team could twist the answer in any direction. If a prospect says ?I don? know?that?s for you guys to decide? or isn?t forceful enough in his answer, then a team may think the player lacks confidence.

If a player answers that he should be in the first round, then a team could go the other way and say that the player has a distorted view of his worth. When Allison got the question, he confidently answered that he should be taken early because he has worked hard, played against the best competition over the past few years, and knows the talent level of his peers.

The team came back and said that Greg Maddux, Curt Schilling and a lot of other great pitchers weren?t first-round picks?so why did Allison think he was better than that.

More than anything, teams want to see if a prospect stands up for himself in this kind of situation. Not a problem with Allison. ?He?s very intense at anything he does,? says his father Bob Allison.

As Allison?s prep career winds down this Spring, he is expected to pitch once a week beginning April 7th. That first start should draw a large contingent of Scouting Directors, National Crosscheckers and baseball personnel ? mainly because by that time they will have already seen the nation?s other top pitching prospects.

One thing that will be unique for scouts when they see Allison this Spring - is hearing the crack of a wooden bat. All of his high school games will be played with wood.

Cold weather, wood bats and Allison?s blazing fastball?that has to be the most challenging situation facing any high school hitter in America this Spring.
 

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