What's new

Terrific Cabrera article

Marlins2003

Muckdog
Joined
Jan 20, 2003
Messages
12,442
Reaction score
0
Here's a link to a really informative article on Miguel Cabrera. Enjoy.

Link to Cabrera article

(Listed under "Other News", half-way down the home page)



P.S. I'd like to see Hollandsworth moved and as a fan, I'd be willing, heck I'd even endorse bringing up Cabrera and platooning him and Banks in leftfield for the rest of the season.
 

Hotcorner

Muckdog
Moderator
Joined
Aug 22, 2002
Messages
21,692
Reaction score
11
Works for me, but I don't think anything will happen soon. Maybe late in the season. (depends on if/when/which trades happen too)

Nice article, thanks Marlins2003
 

markotsay7

Guest
Any way someone could copy/paste the article here? Because of that "How long a baseball season lasts" thing, my computer for some reason can't go to the page...
 

JMLinkinPark

Muckdog
Joined
Sep 8, 2002
Messages
4,159
Reaction score
0
Wednesday, June 11, 2003 5:25AM EDT

'Not that far away' from big leagues
Cabrera leading Carolina, which sits atop Southern League as first half nears end

By AL MYATT, Staff Writer

ZEBULON -- Miguel Cabrera is probably the best combination of youth and talent to play minor league baseball in the area since Andruw Jones, then 18, started the 1996 season with the Durham Bulls.
Cabrera, the Carolina Mudcats third baseman, is blessed with tools.

Scouts who evaluate players on hitting, power, running, fielding and throwing marvel at the 20-year old Venezuelan who should soon provide a nice return for the Florida Marlins on a $2 million signing bonus in 1999.

Baseball America rates Cabrera the No. 1 prospect in the Marlins system and No. 12 overall in minor league baseball. The only dimension he supposedly lacks is speed, but he has stolen nine bases, second highest on the team, and been caught only twice.

"He'll steal a base every now and then," Mudcats manager Tracy Woodson said. "He's not slow but he's not going to light your eyes up with the stopwatch."

Since starting his pro career as a 17-year-old shortstop in the Gulf Coast League in 2000, Cabrera has grown bigger, resulting in his relocation to third base. Now 6 feet 2 inches and 185 pounds, his next significant move could be to the majors.

"He's not that far away," said Andre Dawson, a former superstar himself and now a special assistant to the president of the Florida Marlins, during a recent visit to Five County Stadium.

Cabrera was just 16 when the Marlins signed him. His mother, Gregoria, played shortstop for 10 years on the Venezuelan national softball team.

Cabrera credits his dad, Miguel, and an uncle, David Torres, for schooling him in the fundamentals.

Cabrera devised his methodical pre-at-bat ritual on his own over the past two years. He steps into the box, draws a diagonal line in relation to the plate and positions his feet in an open stance accordingly.

Signing with Florida meant financial security for Cabrera but it also meant leaving the supportive influence of home.

"They took me away from my family," said Cabrera, who banked the bulk of the bonus. "That was the biggest adjustment."

His adjustment to Double-A is going well. He was hitting .374, second in the Southern League, with 56 RBIs, a league high. His slugging percentage (.626) was first in the league, and he led in doubles with 27.

He's capable of carrying Carolina offensively on his strong shoulders.

He's helped the Mudcats to a 4-game lead in the Eastern Division with seven games remaining in the first half of the season. The Cats return home Friday to close the half with a four-game series against the Tennessee Smokies, who are currently in second place.

"He's the force in our lineup," Cats shortstop Josh Wilson said. "Other teams don't want him coming up with men on base and they have to pitch accordingly."

Cabrera does interviews through an interpreter, a role assumed by Adrian Gonzalez, the first overall pick in the 2000 amateur draft who just came down from Triple-A Albuquerque.

"Miguel speaks [English] a little bit better than he thinks he does," said Wilson, who moved from second base to shortstop earlier in his career when Cabrera moved from short to third. "He just doesn't want to say something wrong. He acts his age and that's good. He has fun."

Cabrera's game transcends language barriers.

"In a couple of years of coaching and a lot of years of playing, he's as good as I've seen for his age," Mudcats hitting coach Matt Raleigh said.

"His window is as good as anybody who's in the game right now. In a couple of years this guy is going to be in the big leagues for sure if he's not in there this year."

Meanwhile, the grooming process continues.

"Every team comes in and sees his numbers and they bear down a little bit more," Woodson said. "Defensively, he needs to work on his footwork.

"We've talked about it a lot. He gets flat-footed, but the thing is once he catches the ball -- you're out because of his arm strength."

Raleigh would like Cabrera to change his approach to inside pitches.

"I just try to have him have a nice downward approach to that inside pitch and not have him lift it up," Raleigh said. "He's dropping the barrel a little bit and that front elbow has a tendency to come up just a little bit. He hits the ball so good to center and right-center that sometimes I think he tries to do it too much. If he goes up to higher levels and he takes that approach to the inner half, I think guys are going to try to pound him in there more."

The Marlins have Mike Lowell at third base and he has hit 18 home runs this season. But that doesn't necessarily mean a call-up isn't imminent for Cabrera.

"He's getting close," said Jim Fleming, Florida's vice president for player development and scouting. "When he's ready, we can make room for him and Mike Lowell. ... There isn't a prescription as far as when he comes up. There's no hurry and we'll make that decision as the season unfolds. Right now, he's going to stay there and help them win."

If Florida doesn't win more consistently, that could accelerate Cabrera's rise. The Marlins have moved premier talent before, most notably after 1997 when it became financially impractical for the previous owners to keep a World Series winner intact.

"If they're not in the running, I wouldn't be surprised if they try to go out and get some young players," Woodson said. "They've got some guys on that team they could probably trade that have value. I think it'll all start getting clearer towards the end of the year."


Staff writer Al Myatt can be reached at 829-4556 or amyatt@newsobserver.com.
 

Wild Card

Muckdog
Joined
Apr 25, 2003
Messages
19,020
Reaction score
0
I want to see this kid up now...

I can't wait to see how he fits in with ML players... Hopefully he can have the same kind of instant impact on the team the Dontrelle had...
 

Mephisto

Muckdog
Joined
Sep 6, 2002
Messages
3,337
Reaction score
0
Why dont the marlins move him up to AAA to see how he does there?
 

Wild Card

Muckdog
Joined
Apr 25, 2003
Messages
19,020
Reaction score
0
Your asking the wrong people...

But I'm sure he could hit a solid . 350 there, too...
 

Ramp

Muckdog
Joined
Aug 21, 2002
Messages
38,437
Reaction score
0
Why dont the marlins move him up to AAA to see how he does there?
why rush him?
 

Wild Card

Muckdog
Joined
Apr 25, 2003
Messages
19,020
Reaction score
0
Well, isn't that kinda weird? We don't wanna rush him into AAA, and yet he might be our starting 3B by August (don't count on it but possible).

I think we should get him more of a taste of what the Big leagues are about before he gets here, and put him into AAA soon.

But there has to be some sort of reason he isn't being preped more for the ML... Maybe because Lowell isn't leaving soon, so they don't feel he needs to be ready anytime soon?
 

Top Bottom