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The creation that changed the world forever

Johnny Reb

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The Atomic Bomb.




The World would be in a much better place today had this not been invented.


Even Oppenheimer stated after seeing its destruction something to the extent that he has just created a device that will destroy the world (I will look for the exact quote if its demanded)


Not only did this invention create mass destruction both in Japan and the Southwest United States but it caused the Cold War and mass amounts of money being spent....

The 'fear' of nuclear winter exists still to this day...

But yet the United States has been the only nation to ever unleash the fury of this type of warfare...
 

yankeefan21

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hmmm... I would beg to differ.

How many wars do you think have been DETERRED by the mere threat of a nuclear weapon? How many lives do you think were saved during WWII in the war in the Pacific as a result of the Japanese surrender? How many resources have been saved as a result of nuclear energy?

Interesting fact. The greatest prize for peace is named after a man who hated himself for developing dynamite, thinking that he "destroyed the future of humanity," Alfred Nobel.
 

Johnny Reb

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is the fear of nuclear holocaust worth the benefit?



The United States attitude toward possible nuclear war in the 50s is laughable. They acted like it was no big deal, that radiation was not an issue in the least bit.


What is the actual death toll of both testing and the use of the nuclear bomb? Sure you have those that died as a direct result of the bomb, but what about those that suffered as a result of radiation? What about the landscape poisioned by the effects of the nuclear bomb?


How many wars have been Deterred? Its all debatable. One problem is that I think the US failed to research the full consequences of nuclear warfare. Truman was so excited, like a little boy opening a new present on Christmas, that he just had to go and drop them on Japan.


Still the United States are the only nation to have ever actually dropped the nuclear bomb. What does that say about us? Would we do so again? What's stopping another nation from doing it, after all the Americans did it once.
 

yankeefan21

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First of all - do NOT belittle Truman's decision. By ALL accounts, he was NOT "like a little boy opening a new present on Christmas," when he was finally briefed on the new weapon. He was absolutely floored and conflicted about the weapon. He made a decision to drop a "bomb" that he knew could end the war and save hundreds of thousands of lives. Imagine how unprepared he must have been for JUST how powerful that one little bomb was.

Second, check out this site: http://www.dannen.com/decision/index.html It will erase most of your misconceptions about the Manhattan project and the decisions leading up to the dropping of the bomb. You will see that a group of advisors including the director of the project, Dr. Oppenheimer [the ONE man who knew the true devastating power of this weapon], advised the President that it would be prudent to drop these bombs.

Third, we were initially being driven by the fear that the Germans were developing this type of technology. And, as I'm sure EVERYONE can imagine, Hitler would have had no qualms about using a weapon like this on anyone he chose.

Fourth, check out the petition [the famous Szilard Petition] by the scientists who were ON the Manhattan Project: http://www.dannen.com/decision/pet-gif.html As you will see, Truman followed their advice to the letter. We warned Japan that we possessed this weapon. We warned Japan that they MUST surrender to prevent the use of this weapon. We warned Japan that this was our only choice in order to save Allied Soldiers' lives. And, after using the weapon and seeing its absolute terrible power, we took steps to make sure no one ever used a weapon like that again.

Further, check out Szilard?s US News interview from 1960. Of particular importance is the last question: Q ? ?Would a United States Government today, confronted with the same set of choices and approximately the same degree of military intelligence, reach a different decision as to using the first A-bomb?? A ? ?I think it depends on the person of the President. Truman did not understand what was involved. You can see that from the language he used.?

I would like to further point out that the only other time in history that we had a REAL nuclear threat was during Kennedy?s Cuban Missile Crisis. Think about THAT for a minute. JFK ? who is regarded as a champion for peace and equality ? used the threat of nuclear war to deter perceived Soviet aggression in our part of the world. AND ? Kennedy had the benefit of hindsight and a true understanding and appreciation of the capabilities of a nuclear weapon.

...the United States are the only nation to have ever actually dropped the nuclear bomb. What does that say about us?

It says no one in the world knew what a nuclear bomb was capable of, including us. Now we know and understand and all agree that this is not an acceptable way of changing the outcome of a war. It's kind of like the unwritten rule that you don't kick a guy in the balls in a fight... unless you have no other way of saving your life [yes, I've taught women's self-defense courses ;) ].

I think this is all I will say for now on Truman?s decision.
 

yankeefan21

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The United States attitude toward possible nuclear war in the 50s is laughable.? They acted like it was no big deal, that radiation was not an issue in the least bit.


What is the actual death toll of both testing and the use of the nuclear bomb?? Sure you have those that died as a direct result of the bomb, but what about those that suffered as a result of radiation?? What about the landscape poisioned by the effects of the nuclear bomb?
Laughable?

Correct me if I?m wrong, but aren?t the only 2 documented cases of death by exposure to weapons grade plutonium in the United States Harry Daghlian and Dr. Louis Slotin? Compare that to the undisclosed number of Soviets who have died in accidents including Chernobyl and K-19? Our record REALLY isn?t that bad.

Almost as an aside, I would also like to point out that the United States' position on safety in general was laughable until Nader decided to wage war on the Corvair. I?m not necessarily a supporter of Ralf Nader, but give credit where credit is due. Also, consider how far we have come in terms of safety since even the 80?s. I miss my all steel Tonka trucks that could break a kid?s knee caps. When?s the last time you saw Lawn Darts for sale? I?d ?give an eye? to find my old toy gun that shot rubber bee bee?s? :mischief
 

yankeefan21

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BTW - good posts, Johnny...

WWII History is almost an obsession of mine, and I?m happy to impart any knowledge I can whenever possible to clear up misperceptions people may have about the subject. I?m 10x as happy to learn something new on the subject that might change any misperceptions *I* may have. :cool
 

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