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Tropical Storm Frances Watch Thread


DurableTear
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Oh lord, can our state and FEMA take 3 clean ups at one time?

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Three. Cleanups?

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Bonnie

Charley

possibly Frances

 

Bonnie left damage like unlivable trailers. We all know what Charley did, and we all know what Frances could do.

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Oh geezus, Bonnie's cleanup has been over. It was a few downed trees and a couple of trailers.

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Charley still has plenty of work left. My roof still has not been fixed. I have tar paper on to cover the holes.

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I know Charley's will go on for the better part of a year.

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Note to everyone, please don't use images from other sites. It is copyright infringement. The only images that are legal to use come from the NWS, NOAA, NHC, or TPC.

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almost every photo used here could technically be considered 'copyright inringement'

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ok, then with Das' response, disregard my note. :D

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unfortunately the NHC expects the High to strengthen would not not allow the storm to curve like most do to the north, but like beinfest4prez said it's a good 8-10 days away a lot could change for the better or for worse. the whole eastern seaboard should watch it. what i think would be a huge disaster is a strong cat 3 or 4 htting the new england area and especially the NYC area.

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unfortunately the NHC expects the High to strengthen would not not allow the storm to curve like most do to the north, but like beinfest4prez said it's a good 8-10 days away a lot could change for the better or for worse. the whole eastern seaboard should watch it. what i think would be a huge disaster is a strong cat 3 or 4 htting the new england area and especially the NYC area.

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Thats a stretch...

 

 

I believe the last time that happened was the New England express of 1938.

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unfortunately the NHC expects the High to strengthen would not not allow the storm to curve like most do to the north, but like beinfest4prez said it's a good 8-10 days away a lot could change for the better or for worse. the whole eastern seaboard should watch it. what i think would be a huge disaster is a strong cat 3 or 4 htting the new england area and especially the NYC area.

529550[/snapback]

Thats a stretch...

 

 

I believe the last time that happened was the New England express of 1938.

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but if it were ever to happen again it would be disastrous.

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unfortunately the NHC expects the High to strengthen would not not allow the storm to curve like most do to the north, but like beinfest4prez said it's a good 8-10 days away a lot could change for the better or for worse. the whole eastern seaboard should watch it. what i think would be a huge disaster is a strong cat 3 or 4 htting the new england area and especially the NYC area.

529550[/snapback]

Thats a stretch...

 

 

I believe the last time that happened was the New England express of 1938.

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but if it were ever to happen again it would be disastrous.

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That it would. It was disastorous then.

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A storm surge prediction program used by forecasters called SLOSH (Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes) has predicted that in a category 4 hurricane, John F. Kennedy International Airport would be under 20 feet of water and sea water would pour through the Holland and Brooklyn-Battery tunnels and into the city's subways throughout lower Manhattan.

 

http://www2.sunysuffolk.edu/mandias/38hurr...ane_future.html

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A storm surge prediction program used by forecasters called SLOSH (Sea, Lake, and Overland Surge from Hurricanes) has predicted that in a category 4 hurricane, John F. Kennedy International Airport would be under 20 feet of water and sea water would pour through the Holland and Brooklyn-Battery tunnels and into the city's subways throughout lower Manhattan.

 

http://www2.sunysuffolk.edu/mandias/38hurr...ane_future.html

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Can you say 100s of thousands dead?

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And Frances continues to gain strength...

 

BULLETIN

HURRICANE FRANCES ADVISORY NUMBER 15

NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL

11 AM AST SAT AUG 28 2004

 

...FRANCES SLOWS DOWN WHILE STRENGTHENING SLIGHTLY...

 

INTERESTS IN THE NORTHERN LESSER ANTILLES AND THE NORTHEASTERN

CARIBBEAN SEA SHOULD CLOSELY MONITOR THE PROGRESS OF FRANCES OVER

THE NEXT SEVERAL DAYS.

 

AT 11 AM AST...1500Z...THE CENTER OF HURRICANE FRANCES WAS LOCATED

NEAR LATITUDE 17.4 NORTH...LONGITUDE 51.9 WEST OR ABOUT 740 MILES

...1190 KM...EAST OF THE NORTHERN LEEWARD ISLANDS.

 

FRANCES IS MOVING TOWARD THE NORTHWEST NEAR 9 MPH...15 KM/HR...

AND THIS MOTION IS FORECAST TO CONTINUE TODAY...WITH A GRADUAL TURN

TO THE WEST-NORTHWEST EXPECTED BY TONIGHT OR SUNDAY.

 

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS ARE NEAR 120 MPH...195 KM/HR...WITH HIGHER

GUSTS. SOME STRENGTHENING IS FORECAST DURING THE NEXT 24 HOURS...

AND FRANCES COULD BECOME A CATEGORY FOUR HURRICANE LATER BY SUNDAY.

 

HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 30 MILES... 45 KM...

FROM THE CENTER...AND TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP

TO 105 MILES...165 KM.

 

THE ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 958 MB...28.29 INCHES.

 

REPEATING THE 11 AM AST POSITION...17.4 N... 51.9 W. MOVEMENT

TOWARD...NORTHWEST NEAR 9 MPH. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED

WINDS...120 MPH. MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE... 958 MB.

 

FOR STORM INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA...PLEASE MONITOR

PRODUCTS ISSUED BY YOUR LOCAL WEATHER OFFICE.

 

THE NEXT ADVISORY WILL BE ISSUED BY THE NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER

AT 5 PM AST.

 

FORECASTER STEWART

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