Jump to content


The REAL story of why we didn't offer T. Jones arbitration...


UltimateCabrera24
 Share

Recommended Posts

Why didn't the Marlins offer salary arbitration to Todd Jones before he signed with the Tigers? If they had, they would have gotten a first-round pick plus a compensatory pick in the draft. Were they trying to save money by not offering arbitration?

-- Francisco P., Sunrise, Fla.

 

From what I gathered, there was a bit of a cat-and-mouse game going on the night of Dec. 7, the arbitration deadline evening. The Marlins had been in touch with Jones' agents, Randy and Alan Hendricks, who were finalizing a two-year, $11 million contract with the Tigers. There was a feeling that had the Marlins offered arbitration before the midnight ET deadline, Jones would have accepted it.

 

Based on Jones' strong 2005 season, he was in line to make between $6-7 million. With the Marlins in a cost-cutting mode, they weren't willing to take that chance. The Tigers, meanwhile, were willing to wait until after midnight to assure they wouldn't have to lose any draft picks.

 

I've seen it reported and speculated that the Marlins didn't want to take on the expense of high draft picks, but that doesn't appear to be the case here. Florida did offer arbitration to A.J. Burnett because there was no chance Burnett would sign a one-year deal with the Marlins instead of taking the five-year, $55 million deal from the Blue Jays. So the Marlins are getting extra draft picks as compensation for losing Burnett.

 

Another reason I don't buy the argument that the club didn't want to pay for high draft picks is because teams so often make pre-draft arrangments with players. Last year, for example, the Marlins had three first-round picks and they talked to the players they ended up taking before the draft, seeing if they would sign for a certain dollar amount. The issue of signing those players wasn't a problem because both sides were comfortable with how the contracts would be worked out. Taking on a few extra picks in 2006 could easily have been addressed by pre-draft deals and tinkering with the team's budget.

 

From mlb.com.

 

I knew the part I put in bold was garbage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


If I remember correctly, Todd Jones was reported to have signed with the Tigers nearly two days before the midnight deadline. So, I still view us as cheap SOBs here, because it was HIGHLY likely he wasn't going to turn down a two-year deal for $11 Million when he COULD get maybe half of that in a one-year deal through arbitration after a season that TJones couldn't have expected to duplicate.

 

Also, what this article is forgetting is that AJ signed with the blue jays AFTER B.J. Ryan did, which meant that offering arbitration to AJ only meant that we'd have to shell out some cash for a sandwich pick and a third-rounder. Hardly a king's ransom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's great if the Tigers still offer him the deal when they have to give up picks, be they a sandwich pick and a second rounder. I think the implication is that the Tigers deal would not be on the table had we offered him arbitration, which is why the deal was only finalised after the deadline. The reason being we could not risk the $6/7 million he would have made.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I remember correctly, Todd Jones was reported to have signed with the Tigers nearly two days before the midnight deadline. So, I still view us as cheap SOBs here, because it was HIGHLY likely he wasn't going to turn down a two-year deal for $11 Million when he COULD get maybe half of that in a one-year deal through arbitration after a season that TJones couldn't have expected to duplicate.

 

It was a verbal deal with the Tigers. He didn't officially sign until after the deadline. Look how the verbal deal with the O's and Burnitz turned out, verbal deals can EASILY be renegged.

 

This was all a beat up against the FO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guess what I don't buy it!...I believe the Marlins would have loved to trade a Todd Jones with a minimun qualifying contract if he ever agreed to one. We could have gotten some decent prospects. He would have been auctioned off to the highest bidder. Much more than what We got for Villone. There is no doubt that signing bonuses to unproven draft picks was a concern but then... could those not be traded also?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why does this matter? Todd Jones had ONE good year and hes been around for like 10 so it doesnt matter. hes going to flop next season in detroit and we all will laugh about this.

 

oh and maybe another reason is because JONES is like pushing 50 now and the roster average age is 23, we obviously just wanted to go younger.

 

Jones is gone let it go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I still think the whole signing was BS and the front office knows it. Their is no way he would accept arby if he was getting 11 million dollars over two years, their is no way he would repeat with the same stats another season, and he knew that, he would have easily taken the 11 mil, instead of signing for 7 and then going for 1-2 mill the next summer, pure math, Jones wins with the tigers deal, he would have inked it anyway, somehow I think he screwed us, and Beinfest didn't trust himself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joe Frisaro has diffused this rumor:

 

Why didn't the Marlins offer salary arbitration to Todd Jones before he signed with the Tigers? If they had, they would have gotten a first-round pick plus a compensatory pick in the draft. Were they trying to save money by not offering arbitration?

-- Francisco P., Sunrise, Fla.

 

From what I gathered, there was a bit of a cat-and-mouse game going on the night of Dec. 7, the arbitration deadline evening. The Marlins had been in touch with Jones' agents, Randy and Alan Hendricks, who were finalizing a two-year, $11 million contract with the Tigers. There was a feeling that had the Marlins offered arbitration before the midnight ET deadline, Jones would have accepted it.

 

Based on Jones' strong 2005 season, he was in line to make between $6-7 million. With the Marlins in a cost-cutting mode, they weren't willing to take that chance. The Tigers, meanwhile, were willing to wait until after midnight to assure they wouldn't have to lose any draft picks.

 

I've seen it reported and speculated that the Marlins didn't want to take on the expense of high draft picks, but that doesn't appear to be the case here. Florida did offer arbitration to A.J. Burnett because there was no chance Burnett would sign a one-year deal with the Marlins instead of taking the five-year, $55 million deal from the Blue Jays. So the Marlins are getting extra draft picks as compensation for losing Burnett.

 

Another reason I don't buy the argument that the club didn't want to pay for high draft picks is because teams so often make pre-draft arrangments with players. Last year, for example, the Marlins had three first-round picks and they talked to the players they ended up taking before the draft, seeing if they would sign for a certain dollar amount. The issue of signing those players wasn't a problem because both sides were comfortable with how the contracts would be worked out. Taking on a few extra picks in 2006 could easily have been addressed by pre-draft deals and tinkering with the team's budget.

 

/THREAD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can we cut this junk out right now?

 

The Tigers had the 6th or 7th pick in the draft, thus their first-round pick was protected and wouldn't have gone to us. The best we could have gotten is a supplemental first rounder and second rounder.

 

Todd Jones would have made more through arbitration with the Marlins than the combined bonuses of the typical supplemental first round and second round pick in recent years. Jones would have made more on the open market if his new team didn't have to lose its draft picks. The Tigers knew this and it has been reported that their offer to Jones was contingent on the Marlins not offering arbitration.

 

 

Also note that bonuses to amateurs aren't paid in one lump sum. They are stretched out over many years. Some of these bonuses would still be on the books when the Marlins' hope to have its future secured, whether that be in South Florida or elsewhere.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why does this matter? Todd Jones had ONE good year and hes been around for like 10 so it doesnt matter. hes going to flop next season in detroit and we all will laugh about this.

 

oh and maybe another reason is because JONES is like pushing 50 now and the roster average age is 23, we obviously just wanted to go younger.

 

Jones is gone let it go.

 

 

If that's the case, then why is Lenny Harris still on the bench? That spot would be better suited for someone who can assist by playing the field or pinch hitting in more than a few chances per week. Nothing against Lenny - he has been awesome off the bench, but with the team makeup this year - he is out of place. Why doesn't he fill in as a coach like Mordy.

 

By the way, is Mordy still managing in our minor league system?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...