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Who was the best and worst player ever.


tealmarlin
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I did a post on this guy, John Coleman a few months ago. He certainly needs to be on the list in some capacity. :p

 

http://www.baseball-reference.com/c/colemjo01.shtml

 

So, I'm bored and looking around baseball-reference because I wanted to check the answer to a question a friend of mine asked, and I stumble upon this man John Coleman.

 

The man is a statistical marvel.

 

In 1883 he set the record most losses in a season (48) most earned runs allowed (291) most hits allowed (772) and most amazingly, he allowed 17 homeruns in that season (good for the league lead), while the league leader in homeruns hit only had 10 (remember, this is when the game was mostly played without fences). Combine this with his amazing 12-48 record, and you might have one of the most amazing seasons all time for a pitcher, but on top of this, he closed 5 games that season as well (which is almost unheard of in the era without closers), meaning the man threw 539 innings...and this was his rookie year! I mean, 200 innings in a season is taboo for a rookie starter, he probably had that many by May.

 

Not to be outdone, in 1885 he hit .299, good for 8th in the league, finished 10th in OBP and slugging, second in triples and 6th in RBI.

 

And, when he wasn't pitching in that "magical" season of 1883, he registered an astounding 14 assists and 13 errors in only 31 games!

 

We're talking about, statistically, one of the most amazing players in history.

 

 

http://www.marlinbaseball.com/forums/index...hl=John+Coleman

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I did a post on this guy, John Coleman a few months ago. He certainly needs to be on the list in some capacity. :p

 

http://www.baseball-reference.com/c/colemjo01.shtml

 

 

So, I'm bored and looking around baseball-reference because I wanted to check the answer to a question a friend of mine asked, and I stumble upon this man John Coleman.

 

The man is a statistical marvel.

 

In 1883 he set the record most losses in a season (48) most earned runs allowed (291) most hits allowed (772) and most amazingly, he allowed 17 homeruns in that season (good for the league lead), while the league leader in homeruns hit only had 10 (remember, this is when the game was mostly played without fences). Combine this with his amazing 12-48 record, and you might have one of the most amazing seasons all time for a pitcher, but on top of this, he closed 5 games that season as well (which is almost unheard of in the era without closers), meaning the man threw 539 innings...and this was his rookie year! I mean, 200 innings in a season is taboo for a rookie starter, he probably had that many by May.

 

Not to be outdone, in 1885 he hit .299, good for 8th in the league, finished 10th in OBP and slugging, second in triples and 6th in RBI.

 

And, when he wasn't pitching in that "magical" season of 1883, he registered an astounding 14 assists and 13 errors in only 31 games!

 

We're talking about, statistically, one of the most amazing players in history.

 

 

http://www.marlinbaseball.com/forums/index...hl=John+Coleman

That's pathetic.

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todd dunwoody comes to mind....i hated him..so does Admin sutton, anyone remember him?

 

 

I remember I was at a game when they still had the Krispy Kreme promotion. It was a day game against the D-Backs and we had 11 hits in the bottom of the 8th w/ 2 outs. Mind you we were creaming the D-Backs. So up comes Admin Sutton with the 2 outs and it was all up to him to get the 12th hit. No way he would have gotten it, but guess what? He hits a bloop single and we all get donuts. May the legacy of Admin Sutton live on forever!

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Why the ugly face?

 

Because it is completely ridiculous to call him the worst player ever.

 

Well you must have not been watching to many cubs games, b/c he was the worst player I have ever seen, now I have only been watching baseball since 1992, so there might be someone who is even worse, but you have to admit, he was bad. And this is not the 1980s, he was really bad.

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Andy Larkin may be one of the least effective pitchers ever who got significant playing time. We gave him 14 starts in 1998 and he responded with a 9.64 ERA. For his career, he had a 8.86 ERA in 133 innings, the highest ERA I could find of any pitcher with at least 100 innings.

 

I remember Luis Pujols as being a pretty terrible hitter. He had a lifetime OPS of .500 (.240 OBP, .260 SLG). He survived 9 years mostly because he was willing to attempt to catch the knuckleball, though I don't remember him being particularly good at it.

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I remember Luis Pujols as being a pretty terrible hitter. He had a lifetime OPS of .500 (.240 OBP, .260 SLG). He survived 9 years mostly because he was willing to attempt to catch the knuckleball, though I don't remember him being particularly good at it.

 

:lol

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