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Marlins don't tender Borowski


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MIAMI -- Ideally, the Marlins would like to bring back veteran reliever Joe Borowski. Now, if the 35-year-old free agent signs elsewhere, Florida will not receive any draft pick compensation.

Facing a midnight deadline Friday to tender the Type-A free agent a contract, the Marlins opted not to offer Borowski arbitration.

 

While the Marlins still can continue negotiating with Borowski, they won't be entitled to a compensatory draft pick if he signs elsewhere. Had the Marlins made a tender, and the reliever signed with another team, Florida would have received a first-round pick.

 

Marlins general manager Admin Beinfest has been in discussions this week with Borowski's agent, Ron Shapiro.

 

The risk the Marlins faced in tendering a contract offer is if Borowski decided to take it. Based on his experience, and the fact he had a career-high 36 saves in 2006, Borowski could have earned more than $3 million.

 

This past season, Borowski signed for the league minimum of $323,000. But through incentives, the right-hander earned about $1.1 million. He's in line for a big pay raise.

 

A few days ago, Borowski was close to signing a multiyear contract with the Phillies. However, that deal fell through after a physical was taken. The Phillies are concerned over the status of Borowski's right shoulder.

 

Borowski has had shoulder problems in the past, but he enjoyed a healthy season with the Marlins in 2006, appearing in 72 games and throwing 69 2/3 innings. A source said Borowski pitched through some shoulder pain in the second half, but it didn't stop him from taking the ball whenever asked.

 

Borowski, like the rest of the Marlins players, took an exit physical for Florida. Those results didn't raise any injury concerns.

 

"He was OK for us all year," Beinfest said.

 

A battler, Borowski was one of the team leaders on a youthful Marlins' squad. Beinfest says the club is looking for some experienced relievers for the back end of the bullpen.

 

Borowski fits the mold because of his track record. Since the Marlins feature a staff that includes four starters who were rookies last season, the team wants those young pitchers -- and the team -- to feel confident the bullpen will protect leads.

 

Unless they sign a veteran, the Marlins may have to look within for closing candidates. Two hard-throwing relievers, Henry Owens and Matt Lindstrom, recently obtained in a trade with the Mets, are possibilities. As is lefty Taylor Tankersley, whom the team ideally wants in a setup role.

 

"He did a nice job for us," Beinfest said of Borowski. "I'd say right now, looking at our roster, we don't have anybody in our 'pen who has [closed]. We can grow a closer from within, but we'd be asking a young guy to do that.

 

"Joe has done it. He's definitely established himself as a back-of-the-game guy."

 

The Indians are another team interested in signing Borowski, who likely will sign a one-year deal.

 

http://florida.marlins.mlb.com/NASApp/mlb/...sp&c_id=fla

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The new system really seems to work to the advantage of both parties, at when it comes to players past their prime but still of interest to their exisiting team. The new rules make it possible (Note: I didn't say likely) for the Marlins and Borowski to find a common ground they were precluded from in years past.

 

Giving up a possible draft pick (an extra not one you already are entitled to) for this kind of contractural flexibility was one of the best things to come out of the new agreement.

 

BTW, there's alot of talent floating around there this morning, especially for the Florida's, the Kansas City's, the Tampa's, other rebuilding teams to look at. And the good news is that talent is without compensation and without obligation to long term contracts.

 

I'm starting to think this might be an interesting Winter Meeting after all.

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Stupid on our part, and here's why I think so:

 

In a market where Chad Bradford gets 3 years, ditto Adam Eaton and the number of "reliable" (and I use that word loosely) arms are greatly outnumbered by spots teams are looking to fill, a guy like Borowski will get a two year deal, bad shoulder and all, because of a team like the Reds who need an upgrade and are afraid of getting frozen out.

 

Even if he accepted our offer of arbitration, it's not like we're so ridiculously over budget that we couldn't afford to keep him around, or that a guy on a one year deal isn't very easily tradeable.

 

I have zero evidence to back this up, but I'd suspect this non offer has more to do with our desire to not pay the extra first round pick money than anything else.

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That only is the case for players that aren't in demand. Overall free agents will sign later, a trend that was started by the exploitation of the compensation system the new CBA aimed to prevent, thus increasing player salaries and expanding the negiotating power of players. Not that I'm opposed to that, but it will take great scouting, managing and luck to find a gem among those low-salaried free agents of January. The free agent cycle has been extended, but marketing and player development have not changed. Teams will need players to market and slotted into roles to make future decisions, driving up the demand for the Wes Helms and Joe Borowskis in late January along with the high-profile guys. Any such home town discount would be based on real market value, not mid-November expectations.

 

It will be interesting to see how the next few years play out. I think we can all agree that the influx of cash into the game will still have the largest impact on this offseason than any new rule change.

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The number I've seen thrown around as to what Joe Borowski could expect to get through arbitration is around $5 million (for one year). I would think most people would agree that's excessive, even today considering the reportsof Joe flunking his physical in Philadelphia and how he seemingly withered or at least was having increasingly more trouble getting guys out in September.

 

It has nothing to do with the Marlins' budget or even current white hot market conditions, it has everything to do with the rules/guidelines used by arbitrators and what similiar players have received. And it doesn't matter that Borowski may be injured or not. If other major league closers with similar service and stats (performance) received X$$$ the arbitrator will award whichever arbitration offer is closer to that number. His hands are tied.

 

My guess is the Marlins could today sign Borowski to a multi-year deal for alot less than a guaranteed $5 million figure so why go to arbitration and face the possiblity of paying that $$$ for a single year?

 

Whether Borowski signs here or elsewhere, since the Philly thing, I would think any offers he receives will be heavily incentive-based with little or no option year dollars although might change if he is able to pass a physical elsewhere. The only thing that

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The number I've seen thrown around as to what Joe Borowski could expect to get through arbitration is around $5 million (for one year). I would think most people would agree that's excessive, even today, considering the reports of Joe flunking his physical in Philadelphia and how he seemingly withered or at least was having increasingly more trouble getting guys out in September. His Sept ERA was 6.39, the highest of any month last season.

 

As for arbitration and Joe's worth, it has nothing to do with the Marlins' budget or even current white hot market conditions, it has everything to do with the rules/guidelines used by arbitrators and what similiar players have received. And it doesn't matter that Borowski may be injured or not. If other major league closers with similar service and stats (performance) received X$ the arbitrator will award whichever arbitration offer is closer to that number. His hands are tied.

 

My guess is the Marlins could today sign Borowski to a multi-year deal for alot less than a guaranteed $5 million figure so why go to arbitration and face the possiblity of paying that $ for a single year whether or not he even makes it out of spring training injury-free, nevermind the entire season?

 

Whether Borowski signs here or elsewhere, since the Philly thing, I would think any offers he receives will be heavily incentive-based with little or no option year dollars although that might change if he is able to pass a physical here or elsewhere. The only thing that makes me think Gillick pulling his offer was legit is that if for some reason that deal doesn't come to fruition Borowski is left with a tainted reputation as damaged goods. Or were it to get out that Borowski was in fact healthy and this was a ruse to avoid giving up a draft pick, Borowski is back on the market and now being considered "healthy", his services would be more in demand than ever and the Phillies would be in a position of having to compete for his services against several other bidders.

 

All around, it's a lose-lose for both Borowski and the Phillies.

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Between Philly making this announcement/nixing a possible multiyear deal, Cleveland (the other team mentioned most prominently as being interested in JoBo) signing Roberto Hernandez and Aaron Fultz and what Beinfest had to say about Borowski recently I could see the Marlins offering Borowski a one year deal with a higher base salary and more incentives. Here is the latest from the PBP:

 

Marlins hope Borowski returns

By Joe Capozzi

 

Palm Beach Post Staff Writer

 

Saturday, December 02, 2006

 

MIAMI GARDENS ? The Marlins were expected to allow a Friday deadline to pass without offering salary arbitration to relievers Joe Borowski and Matt Herges. But the team still plans to talk to Borowski about returning.

 

Herges, a veteran middle reliever, no longer fits into Florida's plans. But the Marlins hope Borowski can return as a veteran leader and closer in a young bullpen.

 

"We've talked to him about coming back,'' General Manager Admin Beinfest said. "He did a nice job for us. I would say right now, looking at our roster, we don't have any guys in our pen that have done it in the big leagues. So we would have to grow a new closer from within, and we'd be asking a young guy to do that. I don't know if the new guys we got can do it or not. But Joe's done it.''

 

Borowski, 35, reportedly had reached a multiyear contract with Philadelphia last week before an unfavorable medical report about his right shoulder prompted the Phillies to back out of the deal.

 

Beinfest said a routine exit physical - which he said every Marlins player has at the end of the season - didn't reveal a shoulder problem.

 

Borowski had struggled with shoulder problems for most of the 2004 season. After pitching in Tampa Bay in 2005, he signed an incentive-laden deal with a major-league minimum with the Marlins in January. He went 3-3 with a 3.75 ERA and a career-high 36 saves in 72 appearances, triggering enough incentives to boost his contract's value to more than $1 million.

 

If the Marlins had offered him arbitration and did not end up signing him, they would have been guaranteed a first-round draft pick from another team once that team signed him.

 

But by doing that, the Marlins would have risked having to pay Borowski at least $5 million, money an arbitrator could award him based on the market for relievers. It's also money not projected to be in the Marlins' budget.

 

By non-tendering him, the Marlins still can negotiate a possible deal with him through spring training under a new rule in the collective bargaining agreement reached last month by owners and players. Under the old rule, the Marlins would have been precluded from talking to Borowski until May 1.

 

Source-- Joe Capozzi, Dec. 2, 2006, Palm Beach Post

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I think it's a good move to nontender Borowski, only because the chances of him returning I believe are too high for comfort.

 

Is Borowski the only player we had to offer arbitration to?

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Even if he took whatever deal we had to give, couldn't we just trade him later? There definately seems to be a market for him.

Can't trade newly signed players until June (I think). Now if that includes resigned players could be up for debate, but I would presume they'd follow the same rules.

 

And Rampo, what was the result with Moe and Herges?

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Stupid on our part, and here's why I think so:

 

In a market where Chad Bradford gets 3 years, ditto Adam Eaton and the number of "reliable" (and I use that word loosely) arms are greatly outnumbered by spots teams are looking to fill, a guy like Borowski will get a two year deal, bad shoulder and all, because of a team like the Reds who need an upgrade and are afraid of getting frozen out.

 

Even if he accepted our offer of arbitration, it's not like we're so ridiculously over budget that we couldn't afford to keep him around, or that a guy on a one year deal isn't very easily tradeable.

 

I have zero evidence to back this up, but I'd suspect this non offer has more to do with our desire to not pay the extra first round pick money than anything else.

Not only that, but no precedent either.

 

I think it's fair to say that had Borowski's deal fallen through for any other reason than failing his physical, the Marlins would feel confident in offering him arbitration. But now not only is he unlikely to find a more lucrative multi-year deal than he might receive in arbitration, but he may be unable to pitch well at all. Leaving no reason for the Marlins to tender him a contract. Regardless of whether the Marlins don't want to pay a draft pick bonus money or not. Which makes very little sense in a year where the draft class is said to be good. And that the new CBA changed draft pick compensation for Type B's from a first round pick to a supplemental first round pick would reduce the draft pick's leverage if anything. (If a team with one of the worst 15 records had signed Borowski, we'd had gotten their second rounder which would've come after a suddenly larger supplemental first round, reducing their true slot position and ability to demand bonus money)

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