Jump to content

AFI's 100 Years... 100 Movies (10th Anniversary Edition)


EndLine
 Share

Recommended Posts

BTW, I'm absolutely thrilled with "In the heat of the night" making the list. So So underrated, and probably my favorite Poititer film.

 

Actualy plenty of worthwhile additions, The General(too high IMO though at 18), Do the Right thing at 98, Shawshank Redemption at 72, Nashville at 59, Spartacus at 81, Night at the opera at 85, and I know I'll be ridiculed but Toy Story at 99.

 

All favorites of mine,

 

Movies I'm a little upset that they took off, The Birth of a Nation(in my eyes Political correctness at work), All quiet on the westernfront, Frankenstein, Guess who's coming to Dinner, and The Manchurian Canidate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2001: A Space Odyssey moves up a tad.

Granted it's a matter of taste, but you can make a piece of boring crap as artsy as you want it's still not a great work.

Oh, please.

 

It is no less boring than Gone With the Wind and Lawrence of Arabia are (the latter being a great film) and it is just as well crafted, if not more. If you evaluate the film as a novel, then perhaps I could see why people would say it's boring (which many do). But as a film, it's a masterpiece.

Again it's a matter of taste but while lawrence does get boring in spots, it still holds your attention and is great piece of work. I'm not completely slamming Odyssey, some of the scenes in their are purely classic but getting to them is such a tedious task it takes away from the experience. Outside of man first discovering the tool which is genius, the entire ape scenes are boring as hell. And I don't consider a film an all time great because it has great scenes it needs to work the entire way through. It's just my opinion but in this case one that I hold tightly on to.

 

The only reason I think Odyssey is still so revered, is because no one wants to be seen slamming Kubrick because they feel they will lose their credentials within the critics circle. I also believe that no major critic and film historian wants to be seen slamming an artistic movie because somehow that makes them less dignified. Could I be wrong, yeah I could but I really don't doubt that this list is nothing more than critic's and historians mostly playing it safe and keeping with the rules and standards of today. How else could you explain that The Birth of a Nation was taken off the list despite it being the first great motion picture and a revolutionary piece of work that still impacts us?

 

Oh yeah, it's racist bigoted movie, that's why it's a victim. They made this list playing it safe, and no one wanted to be seen praising a racist work, or IMO an overly arsty work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So they took out Amadeus and added The Sixth f***ing Sense?

 

LOL

Wow. I didn't watch this but what a joke.

 

I don't care about TSS being on there or not but to not have Amadeus. lol.

 

I just saw how large a jump The Deer Hunter made. That would probably top my list of most overrated films ever. Terribly, terribly edited (not just length but there are a ton of continuity errors throughout) and the storyline especially near the end is incredibly over the top. Ugh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That argument could be made for any "classic" film, that's why these lists are bulls*** in the end. It doesn't matter what director made the film, if it has a reputation it would be considered a decision in bad taste to exclude it. 2001 is no exception to this. And neither is Kubrick. There are plenty of critics who bash Full Metal Jacket (Ebert gave it a thumbs down), The Shining, and Eyes Wide Shut, while 2001 and Dr. Strangelove are the most respected. This trend is observed if you look at more reputable critic circles, which I have alluded to here in the past.

 

Interestingly enough, the former three are among his least well crafted while the latter two, his most. So often style is overlooked. After all this is a visual, dialectic art form unlike nothing else. To say the film "doesn't hold your attention so it isn't good" argument is a superficial analysis. A intuitive response is important in film, indeed. But that is only half of it.

And yeah you are right. I just have always looked at it in this sense when it came to 2001 and Dr. Strangelove. I gave both my copies to my film teacher during this school year to be shown in our film class at HS. All the kids loved Dr. Strangelove and 2001 was essentially a nap session. Of course you can't go by solely what the public thinks but their's part of me that ultimately believes that a truly great movie has the right balance of artistic and mainstream credentials. I won't take away from someone who likes 2001 but as previously mentioned I always felt the majority of the movie was more filler than build up to the scenes that you remember. Maybe I just need to see it again.

As for The Birth of a Nation, here's my take: We are undergoing a disturbing movement in American where absurd degrees of political correctness take precedence. One might think excluding the film might have much more to do with a cultural trend rather than an honest analysis of cinema, but there is evidence to think otherwise. For example, The Searchers jumped 84 spots on the list and the film is commonly criticized for racial insensitivity. Likewise for Do the Right Thing, which was added to the list.

 

I agree that Birth of a Nation should be on the list, but you are overestimating the poltics behind this list (for 2001 as well). One could easily make the case that Intolerance is the better film. The cross cutting is more distinct and sweeping, indicating that it is more likely the direct predecessor for Soviet montage. Birth of a Nation is definitely still a culturally significant film but other than taking on the label of being one of the first feature length films, Intolerance is more impactful in a purely cinematic sense.

 

Quite frankly, Griffith is severely underrated as a filmmaker in general.

 

Basically agreed, but I still believe politics has something to do with this list both because of the nature of the films and the fact that these lists are crafted in the mind of not wanting to be controversial or bold because their will be fallout from doing so. I've just always had a fond heart for Birth just because I saw what was beind made before that movie came out and then saw Birth and it really has an impact. It's a shame that's eventually going to be lost and that's why the exclusion of Birth frightens me. Because it was these type of lists that kept this movie in the spotlight. Unfortunately unless you're in a film class or just a film buff, no one will realize just how important this film is. That's why I would always include this film, A) it's a flat out great film, and B) we live in a society that places high demands on list and rankings and if important films like these are left off they are going to become obselete as I see it. I fear The Birth of a Nation will be a victim of that very soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest CrimsonCane

Of the Top 10 Movies:

 

1- Citizen Kane

2- Godfather

3- Casablanca

4- Raging Bull

5- Singin' in the Rain

6- Gone With the Wind

7- Lawrence of Arabia

8- Schindler's List

9- Vertigo

10- Wizard of Oz

 

Which, if any, do you think is least deserving to be in the Top 10? And, what film would you replace it with?

 

Though I love the movie, I think Raging Bull is too high up there. I'd probably put either Sunset Blvd. or 2001: A Space Odyssey above Schindler's List, and move 5th-7th up a spot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So they took out Amadeus and added The Sixth f***ing Sense?

 

LOL

Wow. I didn't watch this but what a joke.

 

I don't care about TSS being on there or not but to not have Amadeus. lol.

 

I just saw how large a jump The Deer Hunter made. That would probably top my list of most overrated films ever. Terribly, terribly edited (not just length but there are a ton of continuity errors throughout) and the storyline especially near the end is incredibly over the top. Ugh.

 

The Sixth Sense was enjoyable. Top 100 in my opinion? No.

 

Nowhere near Amadeus.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Look at the criteria

* Feature-length: Narrative format typically over 60 minutes in length.

* American film: English language, with significant creative and/or financial production elements from the United States.

* Critical Recognition: Formal commendation in print, television, and digital media.

* Major Award Winner: Recognition from competitive events including awards from peer groups, critics, guilds and major film festivals.

* Popularity Over Time: This includes success at the box office, television and cable airings, and DVD/VHS sales and rentals.

* Historical Significance: A film's mark on the history of the moving image through visionary narrative devices, technical innovation or other groundbreaking achievements.

* Cultural Impact: A film's mark on American society in matters of style and substance.

I don't know why some of you are upset about The Sixth Sense making it in. When it came out, people were talking about ending for months. Definitely culturally significant.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have no problems with The Six Sense. I have a hard time with anyone saying that after the first time they saw it they thought the ending was predictable. The tone/mood/conclusion of it? But the 'reveal'? C'mon. It wasn't a huge OMG moment for me but it was pretty great.

 

That film was beautifully, beautifully shot and I absolutely adore James Newton Howard's score for it.

 

Does it belong on a top 100 list? Not sure, I haven't spent a lot of time looking this one over and I don't know if I will. I'm pretty turned off by Amadeus being left out.

 

I don't like the category of 'cultural impact' at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll make it easier and say that this is my list of movies that *I* don't think are top 100 worthy:

 

Austin Powers: Int'l Man of Mystery - funny, but not top 100 funny

Boogie Nights - not a fan.

Three Kings - I guess the movie was okay. I watched it on Netflix and have never felt a burning need to see it again.

Being John Malkovich - I HATED this movie.

Shrek - I like Shrek. Not in the same league as Monsters Inc or Finding Nemo, for example.

Moulin Rouge - OMG. You couldn't PAY me to sit through this garbage again.

Memento - nice gimmick. Gimmick does not = top 100

LOTR Trilogy - I wouldn't even consider this top 10 in the genre.

Chicago - GREAT on Broadway, meh on film.

Mystic River - Sean Penn? Seriously.

Pirates of the Caribbean - nothing great about any of these movies. I suppose they are entertaining but certainly not great.

Lost in Translation - wake me up when Scarlet gets nekked.

Sideways - 126 minutes I'll never get back. I almost jumped out of the plane, then I remembered I was on my way to Hawaii. Woo-sah.

Harry Potter - I guess it was good for a children's movie but top 100?

The Aviator - Howard Hughes was WAY more interesting than his sad biography.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind - it was certainly different. Ultimately, though, not a movie I enjoyed.

Spider-Man 2 - yeah right.

Brokeback Mountain - hooray for butt jockeys! If only a story had evolved from this exploitation of homosexuality.

Good Night, and Good Luck - I was REALLY dissapointed in this movie. It had so much more promise and potential.

Crash - another forced movie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Movies I STRONGLY support:

 

Saving Private Ryan - possibly my favorite movie of all time. This movie deserved every single one of the 5 Oscars it won and could have easily won another handful of the remaining 6 nominations. The story is great, the acting is fantastic, the sound in this movie is mind blowing, the direction is inspired... I can't find a single flaw in this movie and it continues to stand up to the test of time. Tell me I'm a good man. :patriot

 

Gladiator - this was another really great movie. I thought it was really good the first time I saw and have only grown to appreciate it more with each viewing. Are you not entertained? :thumbup

 

Titanic - And the bow of a ship has never been the same again. It's so easy to mock Leo and the story but the bottom line is that this is a great movie on many levels and there's a reason it's one of the top grossing films of all time [by any standard]. There is something very emotionally powerful about Titanic and this movie could have EASILY let you down [see: Poseidon] but it didn't. Sure, mixing a love story in with a tragedy of this magnitude can come across as odd, but it really worked. As Cameron said as Titanic won it's 11th Oscar, "I'm king of the world!"

 

Shakespeare in Love - I truly believe that this movie is greatly under appreciated. The screenplay is absolutely brilliant on so many levels. Not only did Norman and Stoppard tie Shakespeare's muses together so entertaingly, but they also secretly developed a truly Shakespearian style in their story and sprung that upon the audience. Pure genious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Especially, The Third Man. If someone made the claim that it is the greatest film ever made I would have a lot of trouble disagreeing. Easily a top 5 film. Everything about that movie is perfect: textbook cinematography that is still emulated today, dialogue that is sharp as glass, impeccable editing. It is the jewel of the film noir movement (interestingly enough it came toward the end).Of all of the movies I have seen in my lifetime, it is the one film most difficult to criticize and it didn't even make the damn list.

Netflixed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Especially, The Third Man. If someone made the claim that it is the greatest film ever made I would have a lot of trouble disagreeing. Easily a top 5 film. Everything about that movie is perfect: textbook cinematography that is still emulated today, dialogue that is sharp as glass, impeccable editing. It is the jewel of the film noir movement (interestingly enough it came toward the end).Of all of the movies I have seen in my lifetime, it is the one film most difficult to criticize and it didn't even make the damn list.

I don't pay attention to these lists other than to curse at them for how ridiculous they are but with that said I don't think The Third Man should be considered an American film. Carol Reed was British and it was obvioulsy filmed on location in Vienna and probably a London studio. Maybe that's the reason they left it out. If they left it out for any other reason then this shows what a useless piece of junk that list is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

The Army Times made a list of the top 10 war movies that should have made AFI's list. They are:

 

10. A Bridge Too Far (1977)

9. The Dirty Dozen (1967)

8. The Great Escape (1963)

7. Top Gun (1986)

6. Letters from Iwo Jima (2006)

5. The Caine Mutiny (1954)

4. Glory (1989)

3. Black Hawk Down (2003)

2. Patton (1970)

1. Full Metal Jacket (1987)

 

I'd add All Quiet on the Western Front (1930). Although since it's the holy grail of anti-war movies, I can see why it was left off.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



×
×
  • Create New...