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Guest Festa

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I never miss a game. when I'm not home I always put the game to record, so I can watch it when i get back.

 

which brings me to another question.. if i put the game to record on VCR is it still counting towards the rating?

 

i know if you record games on TiVo and DVR it doesn't count towards ratings, so I would assume the same thing goes for the VCR recording.

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I never miss a game. when I'm not home I always put the game to record, so I can watch it when i get back.

 

which brings me to another question.. if i put the game to record on VCR is it still counting towards the rating?

 

i know if you record games on TiVo and DVR it doesn't count towards ratings, so I would assume the same thing goes for the VCR recording.

 

It does count if you report it. The way ratings are messured are by a sample set of people who write down what they watch. I know if I ever got to do a nielsen ratings, I would say I watched every marlins game.

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I believe the last 4 posters missed the entire point of this thread. :|

My point is the Fish are ranked #14 in MLB without the support from the Palm Beach and Naples/Fort Myers markets where they also draw good viewership.

 

I believe you (Chewy) chose to ignore one major point made in this thread so you could enjoy your point a little more.

No, I realize perfectly that the ratings would go up 50% if Palm Beach was included, and it's lunacy that Palm Beach isn't included since it is, in fact, part of the South Florida metropolitan area the Marlins represent. However, I did not want this thread to turn into an endless stream of posts from people who say they are from Palm Beach county, besides it's filling the thread with rubbish.

 

I am sure there is some reason it isnt considered. Maybe because west palm beach to the stadium is about 60 miles away and that is the cut off?

 

I have no idea why it isnt considered and I would assume that other teams have the same deals going on where some major parts of a market isnt included. Also, it is about 60 miles from West Palm to the stadium but most part of the county are closer to the stadium.

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Guest Festa

First off...

 

A) We don't know if the Fish are 14th in amount of people watching the games or percentage of the population watching the game. Rich didn't say which numbers he was looking at. But I'm leaning towards believing he was talking about shares. In that case, it doesn't matter how big the market is.

 

B) Palm Beach and Miami/FTL aren't one TV market because they are independent from one another. Miami and the FTL area have their own network affiliates (WSVN, WFOR, etc.). Palm Beach County has their own network affiliates.

 

C) With that being said, when it comes to the Marlins and the other sports teams Miami/FTL/West Palm should be counted as one media market. For a few reasons. The major reason being West Palm Beach is officially Marlins territory according to the Major League Constitution. Another reason being a sports team transcends media market boundaries and is seen on the same channel. Lastly because Palm Beach is a major metro area just an hour's drive from the stadium.

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First off...

 

A) We don't know if the Fish are 14th in amount of people watching the games or percentage of the population watching the game. Rich didn't say which numbers he was looking at. But I'm leaning towards believing he was talking about shares. In that case, it doesn't matter how big the market is.

 

B) Palm Beach and Miami/FTL aren't one TV market because they are independent from one another. Miami and the FTL area have their own network affiliates (WSVN, WFOR, etc.). Palm Beach County has their own network affiliates.

 

C) With that being said, when it comes to the Marlins and the other sports teams Miami/FTL/West Palm should be counted as one media market. For a few reasons. The major reason being West Palm Beach is officially Marlins territory according to the Major League Constitution. Another reason being a sports team transcends media market boundaries and is seen on the same channel. Lastly because Palm Beach is a major metro area just an hour's drive from the stadium.

 

A. Why would he talk about shares? I assumed it would be # of people watching, not percentage. I mean whats the point of percentage? Lets say only 15% of people in NY watch the mets. Lets just say thats about 1.5 million people. Then we say 25% of Cleveland watch the indians (200,000). More people watch the mets, there is no reason to rank teams in terms of percentage.

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Guest Festa

First off...

 

A) We don't know if the Fish are 14th in amount of people watching the games or percentage of the population watching the game. Rich didn't say which numbers he was looking at. But I'm leaning towards believing he was talking about shares. In that case, it doesn't matter how big the market is.

 

B) Palm Beach and Miami/FTL aren't one TV market because they are independent from one another. Miami and the FTL area have their own network affiliates (WSVN, WFOR, etc.). Palm Beach County has their own network affiliates.

 

C) With that being said, when it comes to the Marlins and the other sports teams Miami/FTL/West Palm should be counted as one media market. For a few reasons. The major reason being West Palm Beach is officially Marlins territory according to the Major League Constitution. Another reason being a sports team transcends media market boundaries and is seen on the same channel. Lastly because Palm Beach is a major metro area just an hour's drive from the stadium.

 

A. Why would he talk about shares? I assumed it would be # of people watching, not percentage. I mean whats the point of percentage? Lets say only 15% of people in NY watch the mets. Lets just say thats about 1.5 million people. Then we say 25% of Cleveland watch the indians (200,000). More people watch the mets, there is no reason to rank teams in terms of percentage.

 

Most of the time when references to ratings (esp. in the Miami Herald) are made the % of the population watching is used over the amount of people watching. If the Marlins are 14th in shares that shows there is a relatively high interest in the general population for the Fish.

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First off...

 

A) We don't know if the Fish are 14th in amount of people watching the games or percentage of the population watching the game. Rich didn't say which numbers he was looking at. But I'm leaning towards believing he was talking about shares. In that case, it doesn't matter how big the market is.

 

B) Palm Beach and Miami/FTL aren't one TV market because they are independent from one another. Miami and the FTL area have their own network affiliates (WSVN, WFOR, etc.). Palm Beach County has their own network affiliates.

 

C) With that being said, when it comes to the Marlins and the other sports teams Miami/FTL/West Palm should be counted as one media market. For a few reasons. The major reason being West Palm Beach is officially Marlins territory according to the Major League Constitution. Another reason being a sports team transcends media market boundaries and is seen on the same channel. Lastly because Palm Beach is a major metro area just an hour's drive from the stadium.

 

...and you can't get away from Palm Beach county targeted advertising from the Marlins, Muvico, billboards, yellow pages.

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Unless the Miami-Fort Lauderdale and the West Palm Beach-Fort Pierce DMAs are merged (aka when hell freezes over as it would drive the Palm Beach TV Stations as we know them out of business) PBC cannot be counted by FSN Florida for home market ratings. Doesn't mean they don't make a nice amount of change there. Same goes for the Fort Myers-Naples market too.

 

As for the share issue, TV ratings are measured in shares instead of total viewers. Advertisers buy based on shares. It is all about the money. Percentages of viewers are important.

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Guest Festa

Marlins TV ratings, attendance rebound from lows of 2006

 

South Florida Business Journal - July 6, 2007

 

by Jim Freer

 

The Florida Marlins are showing how a competitive team featuring familiar players can draw more fans to their TVs and to Dolphin Stadium.

 

Through June, the Marlins had a 3.3 average rating per game in the Miami-Fort Lauderdale market. That's up from 2.2 for the same 2006 period for games on FSN Florida and Sun Sports.

 

Nielsen Media Research's surveys indicate the average number of households that tune in for at least a portion of telecasts. One ratings point covers about 15,000 Miami-Fort Lauderdale TV homes. That gives the 2007 Marlins about 50,000 viewers per game.

 

"Last year, many of the players were new," said Cathy Weeden, GM for the two cable channels. "We came into this season with more guys the fans know."

 

The Marlins are helping viewers stay tuned, with cameras in dugouts during games and interviews in the clubhouse with pitchers who leave games, team spokesman P.J. Loyello said.

 

TV is "a step on the food chain" in getting fans interested in attending games, he said.

 

While Marlins ratings are up 50 percent, average home attendance through June 30 was up 44 percent, from 12,470 to 17,907.

 

Last season, the Marlins average home attendance of 14,384 was last among 30 major league teams. The Marlins' full-season TV rating of 2.9 tied for 17th, according to Street & Smith's SportsBusiness Journal.

 

In 2005, the Marlins had an average rating of 4.3. The Marlins traded several stars, and entered 2006 laden with rookies and low expectations of success by fans. After a slow start, the team improved and average ratings rose from 1.9 in May to 2.8 in June.

 

This year, Marlins' average ratings were 1.9 in May and 2.8 in June. Those ratings usually start rising after non-cable networks enter rerun season and other sports playoffs end.

 

jfreer@bizjournals.com | (954) 949-7513

 

http://southflorida.bizjournals.com/southf...&hbx=e_vert

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They were really starting to get TV ratings up to top levels and attendance to somewhat respectable levels when they killed it all with a huge firesale. At least they're making progress now, but that damn firesale certainly set us back a few years.

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They were really starting to get TV ratings up to top levels and attendance to somewhat respectable levels when they killed it all with a huge firesale. At least they're making progress now, but that damn firesale certainly set us back a few years.

 

About 8,000 fans on average (2005 to 2006) and about half the tv audience was the fall out of the mini firesale

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Miami Herald July 13th

MARLINS RISE

Based on several available gauges -- attendance at home games, hits on newspaper websites, blog participation on newspaper websites -- one might think there's more interest locally, in recent months, in the Heat than the Marlins.

 

But TV ratings don't support that perception.

 

For all of the Marlins' struggles attracting fans -- they rank next-to-last in baseball at 17,821 per game (ahead of only Tampa Bay) -- their ratings remain solid, by South Florida standards. This season, the Marlins are averaging a 3.2 rating (nearly 50,000 homes per cablecast) on FSN or Sun Sports, ahead 33 percent from this point last season.

 

The Heat, which sold out every home game last season (19,721 tickets per game), averaged a 2.9 rating for regular-season games on Sun Sports in 2006-07 after winning an NBA championship the season before. Dolphins games averaged a 16.1 in 2006.

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Miami Herald July 13th

MARLINS RISE

Based on several available gauges -- attendance at home games, hits on newspaper websites, blog participation on newspaper websites -- one might think there's more interest locally, in recent months, in the Heat than the Marlins.

 

But TV ratings don't support that perception.

 

For all of the Marlins' struggles attracting fans -- they rank next-to-last in baseball at 17,821 per game (ahead of only Tampa Bay) -- their ratings remain solid, by South Florida standards. This season, the Marlins are averaging a 3.2 rating (nearly 50,000 homes per cablecast) on FSN or Sun Sports, ahead 33 percent from this point last season.

 

The Heat, which sold out every home game last season (19,721 tickets per game), averaged a 2.9 rating for regular-season games on Sun Sports in 2006-07 after winning an NBA championship the season before. Dolphins games averaged a 16.1 in 2006.

 

Thats not that suprising. Baseball always has higher ratings than basketball.

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Miami Herald July 13th

MARLINS RISE

Based on several available gauges -- attendance at home games, hits on newspaper websites, blog participation on newspaper websites -- one might think there's more interest locally, in recent months, in the Heat than the Marlins.

 

But TV ratings don't support that perception.

 

For all of the Marlins' struggles attracting fans -- they rank next-to-last in baseball at 17,821 per game (ahead of only Tampa Bay) -- their ratings remain solid, by South Florida standards. This season, the Marlins are averaging a 3.2 rating (nearly 50,000 homes per cablecast) on FSN or Sun Sports, ahead 33 percent from this point last season.

 

The Heat, which sold out every home game last season (19,721 tickets per game), averaged a 2.9 rating for regular-season games on Sun Sports in 2006-07 after winning an NBA championship the season before. Dolphins games averaged a 16.1 in 2006.

 

Thats not that suprising. Baseball always has higher ratings than basketball.

but even if the Heat sold out every game....there were many nights when the arena wasn't even close to filled....going to show the SoFla fans suck....they can't be committed to a team for a long season....unless its the Dolphins when they only have to show up on Sunday when there choices were Church or drink beer

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Impressive number, but not really unexpected. The market has a large population compared to many others and the fanbase is there. The only problem is getting them to go to games.

 

This shows there is a market, but the stadium is way too remote, and of course the weather is also a factor. I don't agree with Loria very often but his insistance on a retractable roof does make sense. Then if people don't come out, it's just they are too lazy.

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We are about 13th in TV ratings, so that goes to show you south florida does have fans, but why cant they come out and support the fish? simple....they are playing bad, so in their minds...why come out?

 

I live in central Miami-Dade County, right off of Coral Way near the Palmetto Expressway. It takes me 1 ? hours to get to a Marlins game on a weeknight. And I work out of my home. I can only imagine how long it takes someone that has to fight the rush hour traffic from downtown Miami. At least 2 hours. Then to get to the game and there is a rainout, or rain delay ?

 

Sorry, I'd rather stay at home and watch.

 

People who frequent this board, yet have never lived in Miami or South Fla and pass judgement on those who don't attend games need to shut their pie-holes. They have no idea what it is like.

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Miami Herald July 13th

MARLINS RISE

Based on several available gauges -- attendance at home games, hits on newspaper websites, blog participation on newspaper websites -- one might think there's more interest locally, in recent months, in the Heat than the Marlins.

 

But TV ratings don't support that perception.

 

For all of the Marlins' struggles attracting fans -- they rank next-to-last in baseball at 17,821 per game (ahead of only Tampa Bay) -- their ratings remain solid, by South Florida standards. This season, the Marlins are averaging a 3.2 rating (nearly 50,000 homes per cablecast) on FSN or Sun Sports, ahead 33 percent from this point last season.

 

The Heat, which sold out every home game last season (19,721 tickets per game), averaged a 2.9 rating for regular-season games on Sun Sports in 2006-07 after winning an NBA championship the season before. Dolphins games averaged a 16.1 in 2006.

 

Thats not that suprising. Baseball always has higher ratings than basketball.

but even if the Heat sold out every game....there were many nights when the arena wasn't even close to filled....going to show the SoFla fans suck....they can't be committed to a team for a long season....unless its the Dolphins when they only have to show up on Sunday when there choices were Church or drink beer

 

Yes but the difference with the heat is that the tickets are paid for. If people were paying for marlins tickets but not showing up, I dont think anyone would complain.

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