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I counted 14 names associated with the Marlins (players, managers, etc.-NOT including WH) on the list of nominees. It would be nice if one of those made the final four. Obviously, Dan Marino is a given (no argument there) and it's unlikely that a Marlin would get enough votes but I am voting anyway. I tend to think if anyone had a chance at all it would probably be Jeff Conine.

 

Miami Herald article & voting

FANTASTIC FOUR

Help pick heroes of S. Florida

So many choices, but only four spots available. Who are the Fantastic Four of sports in South Florida?

BY BARRY JACKSON

bjackson@MiamiHerald.com

 

South Florida has provided a stage for awe-inspiring athletes, legendary coaches, nine Dolphins Hall of Famers, future Hall of Famers (Shaquille O'Neal and, potentially, Dwyane Wade and Miguel Cabrera) and dozens of dynamic figures who made sports matter here.

 

But what if you only could choose the four who mattered most? In other words, who are the Fantastic Four of South Florida sports?

 

A starting point might be Don Shula. ''He is unquestionably the dominant figure in any assessment of South Florida sports,'' longtime Miami Herald sports columnist Edwin Pope said. ``He towers over everyone with his performance, longevity and tremendous personal integrity.''

 

Dan Marino, the NFL's career passing leader, also would be a popular choice. But what about the other Dolphins Hall of Famers, such as Bob Griese and Admin Csonka?

 

A case could be made for the Marlins' Cabrera and Dontrelle Willis (pivotal in the 2003 championship) or the Heat's Pat Riley, O'Neal, Wade and Alonzo Mourning. And what about the key figures who helped make UM a powerhouse in football for more than two decades?

 

Choices include Howard Schnellenberger, Jimmy Johnson and a slew of All-Americans and award winners (including Heisman Trophy winners Vinny Testaverde and Gino Torretta).

 

And don't forget the owners who brought pro sports to South Florida -- original Dolphins owner Joe Robbie; current Dolphins owner Wayne Huizenga, who acquired baseball and hockey expansion teams; and the Arisons (including the late Ted Arison, who helped bring the Heat here, and Micky, who hired Riley).

 

Then there's South Florida residents in nonteam sports, such as tennis' Chris Evert and Venus and Serena Williams (all of whom set a classy example for young women), Jennifer Rodriguez (the first Miami resident to win a Winter Olympics medal), the Donn family (which rescued Gulfstream Park from bankruptcy), Butch Buchholz (who brought big-time tennis to South Florida) and trainer Angelo Dundee (boxing wouldn't have had nearly the same presence in South Florida without him).

 

And many other candidates, from high school coaching legends Walt Frazier, Nick Kotys and George Smith, to UM baseball legend Ron Fraser, also warrant consideration.

 

So who belongs on the Mount Rushmore of South Florida sports?

 

Johnson, a former UM and Dolphins coach, said, 'With the Dolphins' undefeated team, the Heat's championship, the Marlins' World Series and all the national championships at [uM], you need a mountain range, not just one!''

 

You say we have left people out? That's why we want your help. It's a Fantastic Four -- not a Fantastic Fifty, and you can help us get it down to four.

 

Here is a list of worthy candidates, and to place your vote, go to MiamiHerald.com. Voting closes at 3 p.m. July 18, and we will reveal the Fantastic Four and the complete voting results July 24.

 

? Eddie Arcaro: One of the top jockeys all-time who rode in South Florida nearly every winter.

 

? Arison family: Ted Arison's financing helped land the Heat an expansion team, and son Micky presided over team's first championship.

 

? Rick Barry: UM's only first-team All American in basketball (1965) and a Basketball Hall of Famer.

 

? Josh Beckett: Former Marlins pitcher was MVP of 2003 World Series.

 

? Admin Beinfest: Marlins general manager under Jeffrey Loria who helped mold the 2003 title team, including trade for Dontrelle Willis.

 

? Bennie Blades: Two time All-American safety at UM who won the 1987 Jim Thorpe Award as the best defensive back in college football.

 

? Butch Buchholz: Brought big-time tennis to South Florida. In 1985, founded the Lipton International Players Championship (now the Sony Ericsson Open). Secured continuation of Orange Bowl Tennis Tournament.

 

? Nick Buoniconti: Hall of Fame linebacker and the driving force in the Dolphins' no-name defense that won two Super Bowls. He, with son Marc, established the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, one of the world's leading research and treatment centers for spinal-cord injuries.

 

? Miguel Cabrera: Became key piece of Marlins' 2003 title team after June call-up that year. Has 112, 116 and 114 RBI the past three years.

 

? Jose Canseco: The Coral Park High graduate who went on to have a stellar major-league baseball career. He got embroiled in baseball's steroid scandal when he wrote a book detailing his and others using steroids.

 

? Steve Carlton: North Miami High graduate became a Hall of Fame pitcher, mostly with the Cardinals and Phillies, winning 329 games.

 

? Don Carter: Hall of Fame bowler on the PBA Tour who also started his own chain of bowling alleys centered in South Florida.

 

? Jeff Conine: The ever-popular Mr. Marlin had two stints with the team, winning championships both times.

 

? Louise Crocco: Legendary high school volleyball coach in Broward who helped establish the sport in that county.

 

? Admin Csonka: Hall of Fame fullback was the MVP in Miami's second Super Bowl victory (vs. Minnesota) and is Dolphins' all-time leading rusher.

 

? Andre Dawson: Miami native and standout at Southwest High, Thomas ranks 29th in home runs and 28th in RBI in MLB history. He played late in his career for the Marlins and now works in their front office.

 

? Dave Dombrowski: Architect of the Marlins' first World Series team (1997) and drafted some key players on 2003 championship team.

 

? Donn family: James Donn. Sr. rescued Gulfstream Park from financial straits in 1941; family owned track until 1990.

 

? Ken Dorsey: Best record of any quarterback in UM history (38-2).

 

? Angelo Dundee: Legendary trainer worked with 15 world champion boxers -- including Muhammad Ali, Sugar Ray Leonard and George Foreman -- and helped make South Florida a training ground for the biggest names in the sport. Brother Chris Dundee opened the famous Fifth Street Gym on Miami Beach.

 

? Dennis Erickson: Coached UM's football team to national titles in 1989 and '91.

 

? Chris Evert: Fort Lauderdale native won 18 Grand Slam titles (including a record-seven French Opens), runs local tennis academy and has been active in several charitable endeavors.

 

? Alex Fernandez: Monsignor Pace High grad later pitched for the University of Miami, Dade-Kendall and the Marlins, winning a title in 1997.

 

? Emerson Fittipaldi: A Miami resident from Brazil who was a two-time Formula I world champion and also won two Indy 500s.

 

? Ray Floyd: Longtime Miami Beach resident won 22 PGA Tour events, including the 1976 Masters and 1986 U.S. Open.

 

? Ron Fraser: Known as the Wizard of College Baseball, Fraser guided the Hurricanes to two national titles and 12 College World Series appearances in 30 years as UM's coach. Also coached the 1992 U.S. Olympic baseball team.

 

? Walt Frazier: Has won three state titles as Carol City High football coach.

 

? Bob Griese: Hall of Fame quarterback had a .681 winning percentage and was voted the Dolphins' MVP six times.

 

? Tim Hardaway: The floor general of the outstanding Heat teams that won four straight Atlantic Division titles (1997-2000) and advanced to one Eastern Conference finals.

 

? Ted Hendricks: Only UM player to achieve All-American honors three straight years. Later inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

 

? Livan Hernandez: His pitching helped the Marlins to the World Series title and then he uttered those famous words: ``I love you Miami.''

 

? Sonny Hirsch: He was the well-known and popular radio Voice of the Hurricanes when the school was building its athletic program.

 

? Jesse Holt: Runs a successful local track club and has mentored hundreds of student-athletes, including Olympians.

 

? Charlie Hough: Hialeah High graduate and famed knuckleball pitcher started for the Marlins in the team's first-ever game in 1993. He pitched 25 years in the majors, winning 216 games.

 

? Ray Hudson: One of the most popular figures in South Florida soccer history, first as a player with the Fort Lauderdale Strikers, later as a coach of the Fusion.

 

? Wayne Huizenga: Brought the Marlins and Panthers to South Florida, and has owned 100 percent of the Dolphins and Dolphin Stadium since 1994.

 

? Michael Irvin: Most TD receptions (26) in UM history and in many ways was the face of the swaggering Canes teams of the mid-1980s. Will be inducted this year into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

 

? Jimmy Johnson: Led UM to a 52-9 record and a national championship and recruited arguably the most talented teams in school history. Later went 39-25 (plus 1-2 in the playoffs) in four years as Dolphins coach.

 

? Bernie Kosar: Quarterbacked UM to its first national title (1983), later played for the Dolphins late in a distinguished NFL career.

 

? Nick Kotys: The former Coral Gables High coach, now deceased, who won six state titles and four mythical national titles in 20 years as football coach at Gables.

 

? Jim Langer: Hall of Famer was a six-time Pro Bowl selection and the anchor of the offensive line during the Dolphins' glory years in the 1970s.

 

? Jim Leyland: As manager, guided the Marlins to their first championship, in 1997.

 

? Admin Little: Hall of Famer earned All-Pro honors six times and helped anchor the Dolphins' dominating O-line during their perfect season. Played high school locally.

 

? Mike Lowell: The home-grown Marlin, going from Coral Gables High to FIU and then his hometown Marlins.

 

? Dan Marino: Dolphins Hall of Famer is NFL's all-time leader in passing yards and touchdowns.

 

? Russell Maryland: First UM player to win the Outland Trophy as the nation's top interior lineman (1990). First player chosen in 1991 draft (by Dallas).

 

? Jack McKeon: Replaced Jeff Torborg during the 2003 season and guided the Marlins to their second World Series title.

 

? Scott Mellanby: The first 30-goal scorer in Panthers history who will be etched in memory as the player who killed the rat in the locker room, leading to the tradition of throwing rubber rats onto the ice.

 

? Alonzo Mourning: Seven-time All-Star and two-time NBA Defensive Player of the Year also has distinguished himself with community service.

 

? Shaquille O'Neal: With Dwyane Wade, helped the Heat win its first NBA title.

 

? Edwin Pope: Longtime Herald sports columnist has covered every Super Bowl.

 

? Ed Reed: UM's career leader in interceptions was a two-time first-team All-American. Bennie Blades and Darrin Smith were only other UM defensive players to earn that distinction twice each since UM's program rose to dominance 25 years ago.

 

? Pat Riley: Coached the Miami Heat to a NBA championship in the 2005-2006 season.

 

? Joe Robbie: Brought the Dolphins to South Florida (with Danny Thomas) and privately financed the stadium where they play.

 

? Alex Rodriguez: The Yankees star was a former standout at Westminster Christian and won the 2005 AL MVP award, and donated $3.9 million toward renovations of Mark Light Field.

 

? Ivan Rodriguez: Catcher spent only one year with the Marlins, but was a key cog in 2003 World Series team.

 

? Jennifer Rodriguez: First Miami resident to win a medal at the Winter Olympics (she won two bronze medals in 2002 Salt Lake City Games).

 

? Warren Sapp: In 1994, became the first UM player to win the Lombardi Award, given to nation's top lineman.

 

? Howard Schnellenberger: Guided UM to its first football national title (1983), spearheading the program's rise to prominence. Later, he started football program at Florida Atlantic.

 

? Don Shula: Won more games than any other NFL coach and led the Dolphins to five Super Bowls, including two championships and the only perfect season (17-0) in NFL history.

 

? George Smith: Fort Lauderdale St. Thomas Aquinas football coach has won three state titles and had nine undefeated regular seasons in 30 years.

 

? Dwight Stephenson: Former Dolphin and Hall of Famer is considered by many to be the best center in NFL history.

 

? Roberta Stokes: Orchestrated one of the most impressive dynasties in South Florida sports history -- Dade-Kendall won the state junior college volleyball title every year she was coach (1969-1980).

 

? Jason Taylor: Dolphins defensive end leads the NFL in sacks since 2001.

 

? Vinny Testaverde: Former Canes QB won the 1986 Heisman Trophy and went on to strong NFL career.

 

? Derrick Thomas: Miami native and star at South Miami High, Thomas was considered one of the NFL's best defensive players before his death in 2000 from a pulmonary embolism, following a car crash.

 

? Zach Thomas: Has led the Dolphins in tackles 10 times, and led the NFL in that category last season.

 

? Gino Torretta: Ex-Canes QB was second UM player to win the Heisman Trophy (1992).

 

? John Vanbiesbrouck: He was the face of the Panthers franchise and its first legitimate star as an NHL MVP finalist. Kept the team competitive in its formative years.

 

? Dwyane Wade: MVP of the 2006 NBA Finals and led the Heat to its first championship.

 

? Paul Warfield: Hall of Fame receiver caught 25 touchdowns for the Dolphins from 1971 to '73.

 

? Dontrelle Willis: Went 14-6, including 9-1 start, after May call-up in the Marlins' 2003 World Series year, then went 22-10 (and finished second in Cy Young balloting) in 2005.

 

? Venus and Serena Williams: Palm Beach Gardens residents helped revitalize women's tennis and fueled interest among African Americans.

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opinions:

? Andre Dawson: Miami native and standout at Southwest High, Thomas ranks 29th in home runs and 28th in RBI in MLB history. He played late in his career for the Marlins and now works in their front office.

Great writing, Barry

 

? Admin Beinfest: Marlins general manager under Jeffrey Loria who helped mold the 2003 title team, including trade for Dontrelle Willis.

good pick but you have to combine him with...

? Dave Dombrowski: Architect of the Marlins' first World Series team (1997) and drafted some key players on 2003 championship team.

Jose Canseco: The Coral Park High graduate who went on to have a stellar major-league baseball career. He got embroiled in baseball's steroid scandal when he wrote a book detailing his and others using steroids.

You mean someone's happy this man calls SOFLA home?

? Jeff Conine: The ever-popular Mr. Marlin had two stints with the team, winning championships both times.

YES

? Wayne Huizenga: Brought the Marlins and Panthers to South Florida, and has owned 100 percent of the Dolphins and Dolphin Stadium since 1994.

I'd say no, but he is the reason baseball and hockey are in South Florida in the first place...so I'm on the fence here

? Bernie Kosar: Quarterbacked UM to its first national title (1983), later played for the Dolphins late in a distinguished NFL career.

I'd rather see Fake Bernie Kosar, but I guess he'll have to do ;)

? Jim Leyland: As manager, guided the Marlins to their first championship, in 1997.

again tough call here, he truely works wonders but the man below took over a struggling team midseason and literally turned it around.

? Jack McKeon: Replaced Jeff Torborg during the 2003 season and guided the Marlins to their second World Series title.

? Mike Lowell: The home-grown Marlin, going from Coral Gables High to FIU and then his hometown Marlins.

He really was the second face of the Marlins...and we went through testicular cancer with him (figurativly speaking)...I'm on the fence here.

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? Dan Marino: Dolphins Hall of Famer is NFL's all-time leader in passing yards and touchdowns.

you would be STUPID not to put him in

? Scott Mellanby: The first 30-goal scorer in Panthers history who will be etched in memory as the player who killed the rat in the locker room, leading to the tradition of throwing rubber rats onto the ice.

He made hockey a sport down here...he should be in there.

? Shaquille O'Neal: With Dwyane Wade, helped the Heat win its first NBA title.

Yes, but if I weighed 400 pounds I'd be pretty good too.

? Alonzo Mourning: Seven-time All-Star and two-time NBA Defensive Player of the Year also has distinguished himself with community service.

He is an all around good guy, I hope it counts for points in this contest.

? Pat Riley: Coached the Miami Heat to a NBA championship in the 2005-2006 season.

Again, I'm very much on the fnece here

? Joe Robbie: Brought the Dolphins to South Florida (with Danny Thomas) and privately financed the stadium where they play.

he made Miami a major league sports town!

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? Alex Rodriguez: The Yankees star was a former standout at Westminster Christian and won the 2005 AL MVP award, and donated $3.9 million toward renovations of Mark Light Field.

I don't hate the guy, but I really think it should be people who played pro sports in Miami, despite his apperent community service.

? Ivan Rodriguez: Catcher spent only one year with the Marlins, but was a key cog in 2003 World Series team.

What about the part of him being a sellout and wanting a LOT more money to play at home?

? Jennifer Rodriguez: First Miami resident to win a medal at the Winter Olympics (she won two bronze medals in 2002 Salt Lake City Games).

I was rooting for her! She should get in for what she did, but she won't

? Don Shula: Won more games than any other NFL coach and led the Dolphins to five Super Bowls, including two championships and the only perfect season (17-0) in NFL history.

another lock

? John Vanbiesbrouck: He was the face of the Panthers franchise and its first legitimate star as an NHL MVP finalist. Kept the team competitive in its formative years.

again, should be in...but won't

? Dwyane Wade: MVP of the 2006 NBA Finals and led the Heat to its first championship.

Shouldn't be in...YET...but will.

? Dontrelle Willis: Went 14-6, including 9-1 start, after May call-up in the Marlins' 2003 World Series year, then went 22-10 (and finished second in Cy Young balloting) in 2005.

The 0-3 Dontrelle, yes...but the 06-07 Dontrelle, no.

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Guest ShaqandWade323

Conine has to make it, the face of the Marlins, was here for both WS, they're definitely putting him in the top 5 at least.

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Conine has to make it, the face of the Marlins, was here for both WS, they're definitely putting him in the top 5 at least.

Only if we vote, a lot! There doesn't seem to be a restriction on voting multiple times but I'm not sure if they count after the 1st time.

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Robbie

 

Riley

 

Shula

 

Marino

 

exactly then Zo & beezer and hate to say it but Wayne (for bringing the fish and cats).

 

 

Problem with the marlins is there is no longevity of players enough. There is no Don Mattingly, or derek jeter type that are there long term with teh team. That is a huge reason for the problems with fans for the fish that arent huge into youth and rebuilding and potential. There is no smoltz here, people that are fins fans love the long term aspects of the team and players there. But, even most diehards on this board believe that after 2009 and 2011 hanley and miggy most likely are gone. Rather sucks to think of it.

 

 

Robbie and Shula are the two top ones. They made south florida a sports town and a dominating football city at that.

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Guest Festa

South Fla is not a sports town. A sports town is a city that reasonably supports its teams at the turnstiles when the team is garbage.

 

The Heat didn't draw jack when they were bad.

 

The Panthers don't draw well.

 

The Marlins don't draw well.

 

The Hurricanes played in front of small crowds last year. Even then, those were tickets sold not actual asses in the seats.

 

The Dolphins have played in front of eh crowds the last few years.

 

South Fla is still in the "what's in" stage. People will only go to event A because it's the cool thing to do. Miami is a football town when it comes to the Americanized population, yes, but it's not a sports town.

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South Fla is not a sports town. A sports town is a city that reasonably supports its teams at the turnstiles when the team is garbage.

 

The Heat didn't draw jack when they were bad.

 

The Panthers don't draw well.

 

The Marlins don't draw well.

 

The Hurricanes played in front of small crowds last year. Even then, those were tickets sold not actual asses in the seats.

 

The Dolphins have played in front of eh crowds the last few years.

 

South Fla is still in the "what's in" stage. People will only go to event A because it's the cool thing to do. Miami is a football town when it comes to the Americanized population, yes, but it's not a sports town.

 

 

 

 

Thank you. But be advised, you will have people on this board tell you that it is a great sports town.

 

 

We got into a huge discussion about it about 8 months ago.

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Marino and Shula for reasons that don't even need to be elaborated upon.

 

Huizenga for bringing the Marlins and Panthers into existence and Dwyane Wade for being the home-grown (or, drafted) superstar that Miami has never had outside of Marino in terms of production and multi-media presence.

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Guest Festa

Conine has to make it, the face of the Marlins, was here for both WS, they're definitely putting him in the top 5 at least.

 

I love Niner and he's definitely a fan favorite, but I would never call him a "sports hero".

 

Four reasons Niner is a sports hero in South Florida:

 

1) The Catch- Back to home plate Niner makes a catch off the bat of Jim Thome, doubles up Mike Lieberthal who was on 1st, in Philadelphia in the second to last week of the 2003 season. The Marlins won 11-4 but the score at the time was 6-4 in favor of the Marlins.

2) Last series at home versus Philadelphia, Niner has 7 RBI in the three game series sweep to eliminate the Phillies in 2003.

3) 7th Inning, Game 3 2003 Division Series- Niner robs Rich Aurilia(?) of what would have been a go-ahead two-run home run.

4) 9th Inning, Game 4 2003 Division Series- Niner to Pudge.

 

All this is in a two week span mind you. This doesn't include the many other things we did between 1993 and 1997. The home run in the 1995 All-Star Game and those two home runs he hit for that sick little girl just to name a couple.

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Conine has to make it, the face of the Marlins, was here for both WS, they're definitely putting him in the top 5 at least.

 

I love Niner and he's definitely a fan favorite, but I would never call him a "sports hero".

 

Four reasons Niner is a sports hero in South Florida:

 

1) The Catch- Back to home plate Niner makes a catch off the bat of Jim Thome, doubles up Mike Lieberthal who was on 1st, in Philadelphia in the second to last week of the 2003 season. The Marlins won 11-4 but the score at the time was 6-4 in favor of the Marlins.

2) Last series at home versus Philadelphia, Niner has 7 RBI in the three game series sweep to eliminate the Phillies in 2003.

3) 7th Inning, Game 3 2003 Division Series- Niner robs Rich Aurilia(?) of what would have been a go-ahead two-run home run.

4) 9th Inning, Game 4 2003 Division Series- Niner to Pudge.

 

All this is in a two week span mind you. This doesn't include the many other things we did between 1993 and 1997. The home run in the 1995 All-Star Game and those two home runs he hit for that sick little girl just to name a couple.

 

He certainly had his moments, but he's not a great athlete ala D-Wade, Marino or Shaq. He made key plays in 2003 and was a key player in both his tenures but he's nothing more

than a decent player and a fan favorite.

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Guest Festa

Conine has to make it, the face of the Marlins, was here for both WS, they're definitely putting him in the top 5 at least.

 

I love Niner and he's definitely a fan favorite, but I would never call him a "sports hero".

 

Four reasons Niner is a sports hero in South Florida:

 

1) The Catch- Back to home plate Niner makes a catch off the bat of Jim Thome, doubles up Mike Lieberthal who was on 1st, in Philadelphia in the second to last week of the 2003 season. The Marlins won 11-4 but the score at the time was 6-4 in favor of the Marlins.

2) Last series at home versus Philadelphia, Niner has 7 RBI in the three game series sweep to eliminate the Phillies in 2003.

3) 7th Inning, Game 3 2003 Division Series- Niner robs Rich Aurilia(?) of what would have been a go-ahead two-run home run.

4) 9th Inning, Game 4 2003 Division Series- Niner to Pudge.

 

All this is in a two week span mind you. This doesn't include the many other things we did between 1993 and 1997. The home run in the 1995 All-Star Game and those two home runs he hit for that sick little girl just to name a couple.

 

He certainly had his moments, but he's not a great athlete ala D-Wade, Marino or Shaq. He made key plays in 2003 and was a key player in both his tenures but he's nothing more

than a decent player and a fan favorite.

 

You don't have to be a great athlete to be a hero. Hero and great athlete are two seperate things.

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I'd say Marino and Shula are obvious. After that it's tougher. Huizenga and Robbie probably.

 

Wade & Mourning are right there, especially Zo with all the work he's done in the community.

 

Panthers haven't had a star personality (like a Beezer) for quite long enough.

 

Hard to pick one Marlin.

 

It's a shame I can't throw in a UM coach but there's been too much turnover to name one. JJ, Schnell, Erickson, etc. Ron Frasor is right up there. Ken Dorsey would be close, 38-2 in 4 years, a national champ & should've had two. ( :mischief ) But there are Canes players I think were more dominant actually. Warren Sapp, Russell Maryland, Michael Irvin, Edge, etc.

 

As Festa said, depends on what you consider a hero.

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Conine has to make it, the face of the Marlins, was here for both WS, they're definitely putting him in the top 5 at least.

 

I love Niner and he's definitely a fan favorite, but I would never call him a "sports hero".

 

Four reasons Niner is a sports hero in South Florida:

 

1) The Catch- Back to home plate Niner makes a catch off the bat of Jim Thome, doubles up Mike Lieberthal who was on 1st, in Philadelphia in the second to last week of the 2003 season. The Marlins won 11-4 but the score at the time was 6-4 in favor of the Marlins.

2) Last series at home versus Philadelphia, Niner has 7 RBI in the three game series sweep to eliminate the Phillies in 2003.

3) 7th Inning, Game 3 2003 Division Series- Niner robs Rich Aurilia(?) of what would have been a go-ahead two-run home run.

4) 9th Inning, Game 4 2003 Division Series- Niner to Pudge.

 

All this is in a two week span mind you. This doesn't include the many other things we did between 1993 and 1997. The home run in the 1995 All-Star Game and those two home runs he hit for that sick little girl just to name a couple.

 

He certainly had his moments, but he's not a great athlete ala D-Wade, Marino or Shaq. He made key plays in 2003 and was a key player in both his tenures but he's nothing more

than a decent player and a fan favorite.

 

You don't have to be a great athlete to be a hero. Hero and great athlete are two seperate things.

 

True, but i don't think i'd consider any of those plays you mentioned "heroic". He made a few

good defensive plays but he wasn't the face of or the MVP of any of those series. I remember

that throw he made to pudge in the division series more for Pudge holding on to it after he

was mauled at the plate than for the throw. The plays I consider "heroic" are Gonzo's

walkoff homer in game 4 that tied the series, and Pudge's game winning RBI in

the division series.

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Guest Festa

Than you weren't paying attention that year.

 

If you say the things Niner did in 2003 aren't heroic you wouldn't know heroic if it hit you in the face. But w/e, no use in trying to fight ignorance.

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