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Hugo Chavez has died


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oh, yes. one can be a marlins fan and also a chávez supporter. since 2005 when FTAA (ALCA) was finally buried in the summit of the americas.

 

So, you admit that you are an opponent of capitalism and free trade.

 

I say good riddance to a buffoon and thug who has set Venezuelan democracy and the Venezuelan economy back by decades.

 

The "man of the people," a mere soldier in the army when he started his crusade, stuffed a billion dollars into his pockets after he took power. Meanwhile, Venezuelan oil production declined by a million barrels per day, and consumer prices are 20 times higher than they were. Nothing like a little state-inspired inflation, eh?

 

There's a reason that people and capital have been fleeing Venezuela for the last 15 years and will continue to do so until Chavez's underlings have been thrown out by whatever means.

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Definitely opposed to free trade.

 

He took a country with a 49.9% poverty in 99. In 2012 only 21%. Unemployment from 16,6 to 8%.

 

I don't see any set backs there.

 

I wont start on welfare or literacy rates. People were excluded, now they have a government who will step up under their needs.

 

I found this nice article that represents where Latin America is situated right now:

 

Chavez's legacy

 

 

 

 

 

Hugo Chavez will be mourned not only by Venezuelans, but also by many others who appreciate what he did for the region.

 

 

Bertrand Russell once wrote about the American revolutionary Thomas Paine, "He had faults, like other men; but it was for his virtues that he was hated and successfully calumniated."

 

This was certainly true of Hugo Chavez Frias, who was probably more demonised than any democratically elected president in world history. But he was repeatedly re-elected by wide margins, and will be mourned not only by Venezuelans, but also by many Latin Americans who appreciate what he did for the region.

 

Chavez survived a military coup backed by Washington and oil strikes that crippled the economy. But once he got control of the oil industry, his government reduced poverty by half and extreme poverty by 70 percent.

 

Millions of people also got access to health care for the first time, and access to education also increased sharply, with college enrollment doubling and free tuition for many. Eligibility for public pensions tripled.

 

He kept his campaign promise to share the country's oil wealth with Venezuela's majority, and that will be part of his legacy.

So, too will be the second independence of Latin America, and especially South America, which is now more independent of the US than Europeis. Of course, this would not have happened without Chavez's close friends and allies: Lula in Brazil, the Kirchners in Argentina, Evo Morales in Bolivia, Rafael Correa in Ecuador and others.

 

But Chavez was the first of the democratically-elected left presidents in the past 15 years, and he played a very important role; look to what these colleagues will say of him and you will find it to be much more important than most of the other obituaries, anti-obituaries and commentaries.

 

These left governments have also made considerable advances in reducing poverty, increasing employment and raising overall living standards - and their parties, too have been continually re-elected.

For these other democratic leaders, Chavez is seen as part of this continent-wide revolt at the ballot box that transformed South America and increased opportunities and political participation for previously excluded majorities and minorities.

Continuity in Venezuela is most likely following Chavez's death, since his political party has more than 7 million members and demonstrated its ability to win elections without him campaigning in the December local elections, where they picked up five state governorships to win 20 of 23 states.

 

Relations with the United States are unlikely to improve; the State Department and President Obama himself made a number of hostile statements during Chavez's last months of illness, indicating that no matter what the next government (presumably under Nicolas Maduro) does, there is not much interest on Washington's part in improving relations.

 

Mark Weisbrot is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, in Washington, DC. He is also president of Just Foreign Policy.

 

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2013/03/20133663030968692.html

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It's kind of hard not to lower the poverty rate, when the bar for being poor is continuously lowered to get more people above it.

 

Captialism by itself isn't always good, but it's principles when used correctly are.

 

Time is Money. A penny saved is a penny earned. Disregard Females, Acquire Currency.

 

All good ideas, lacking in execution sometimes.

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Definitely opposed to free trade.

 

He took a country with a 49.9% poverty in 99. In 2012 only 21%. Unemployment from 16,6 to 8%.

 

I don't see any set backs there.

 

I wont start on welfare or literacy rates. People were excluded, now they have a government who will step up under their needs.

 

I found this nice article that represents where Latin America is situated right now:

 

 

 

Chavez's legacy

 

Hugo Chavez will be mourned not only by Venezuelans, but also by many others who appreciate what he did for the region.

 

Bertrand Russell once wrote about the American revolutionary Thomas Paine, "He had faults, like other men; but it was for his virtues that he was hated and successfully calumniated."

 

This was certainly true of Hugo Chavez Frias, who was probably more demonised than any democratically elected president in world history. But he was repeatedly re-elected by wide margins, and will be mourned not only by Venezuelans, but also by many Latin Americans who appreciate what he did for the region.

 

Chavez survived a military coup backed by Washington and oil strikes that crippled the economy. But once he got control of the oil industry, his government reduced poverty by half and extreme poverty by 70 percent.

 

Millions of people also got access to health care for the first time, and access to education also increased sharply, with college enrollment doubling and free tuition for many. Eligibility for public pensions tripled.

 

He kept his campaign promise to share the country's oil wealth with Venezuela's majority, and that will be part of his legacy.

So, too will be the second independence of Latin America, and especially South America, which is now more independent of the US than Europeis. Of course, this would not have happened without Chavez's close friends and allies: Lula in Brazil, the Kirchners in Argentina, Evo Morales in Bolivia, Rafael Correa in Ecuador and others.

 

But Chavez was the first of the democratically-elected left presidents in the past 15 years, and he played a very important role; look to what these colleagues will say of him and you will find it to be much more important than most of the other obituaries, anti-obituaries and commentaries.

 

These left governments have also made considerable advances in reducing poverty, increasing employment and raising overall living standards - and their parties, too have been continually re-elected.

For these other democratic leaders, Chavez is seen as part of this continent-wide revolt at the ballot box that transformed South America and increased opportunities and political participation for previously excluded majorities and minorities.

Continuity in Venezuela is most likely following Chavez's death, since his political party has more than 7 million members and demonstrated its ability to win elections without him campaigning in the December local elections, where they picked up five state governorships to win 20 of 23 states.

 

Relations with the United States are unlikely to improve; the State Department and President Obama himself made a number of hostile statements during Chavez's last months of illness, indicating that no matter what the next government (presumably under Nicolas Maduro) does, there is not much interest on Washington's part in improving relations.

 

Mark Weisbrot is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, in Washington, DC. He is also president of Just Foreign Policy.

 

Did you just link to Al Jazeera? I'm not going to get into a political debate with you, because quite frankly I've tired of politics since I was a teenager but your coming across as someone McCarthy would have tried to destroy.

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Definitely opposed to free trade.

 

He took a country with a 49.9% poverty in 99. In 2012 only 21%. Unemployment from 16,6 to 8%.

 

I don't see any set backs there.

 

I wont start on welfare or literacy rates. People were excluded, now they have a government who will step up under their needs.

 

I found this nice article that represents where Latin America is situated right now:

 

 

 

Chavez's legacy

 

Hugo Chavez will be mourned not only by Venezuelans, but also by many others who appreciate what he did for the region.

 

Bertrand Russell once wrote about the American revolutionary Thomas Paine, "He had faults, like other men; but it was for his virtues that he was hated and successfully calumniated."

 

This was certainly true of Hugo Chavez Frias, who was probably more demonised than any democratically elected president in world history. But he was repeatedly re-elected by wide margins, and will be mourned not only by Venezuelans, but also by many Latin Americans who appreciate what he did for the region.

 

Chavez survived a military coup backed by Washington and oil strikes that crippled the economy. But once he got control of the oil industry, his government reduced poverty by half and extreme poverty by 70 percent.

 

Millions of people also got access to health care for the first time, and access to education also increased sharply, with college enrollment doubling and free tuition for many. Eligibility for public pensions tripled.

 

He kept his campaign promise to share the country's oil wealth with Venezuela's majority, and that will be part of his legacy.

So, too will be the second independence of Latin America, and especially South America, which is now more independent of the US than Europeis. Of course, this would not have happened without Chavez's close friends and allies: Lula in Brazil, the Kirchners in Argentina, Evo Morales in Bolivia, Rafael Correa in Ecuador and others.

 

But Chavez was the first of the democratically-elected left presidents in the past 15 years, and he played a very important role; look to what these colleagues will say of him and you will find it to be much more important than most of the other obituaries, anti-obituaries and commentaries.

 

These left governments have also made considerable advances in reducing poverty, increasing employment and raising overall living standards - and their parties, too have been continually re-elected.

For these other democratic leaders, Chavez is seen as part of this continent-wide revolt at the ballot box that transformed South America and increased opportunities and political participation for previously excluded majorities and minorities.

Continuity in Venezuela is most likely following Chavez's death, since his political party has more than 7 million members and demonstrated its ability to win elections without him campaigning in the December local elections, where they picked up five state governorships to win 20 of 23 states.

 

Relations with the United States are unlikely to improve; the State Department and President Obama himself made a number of hostile statements during Chavez's last months of illness, indicating that no matter what the next government (presumably under Nicolas Maduro) does, there is not much interest on Washington's part in improving relations.

 

Mark Weisbrot is co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, in Washington, DC. He is also president of Just Foreign Policy.

 

Did you just link to Al Jazeera? I'm not going to get into a political debate with you, because quite frankly I've tired of politics since I was a teenager but your coming across as someone McCarthy would have tried to destroy.

 

 

I think you should actually read about Al Jazeera instead of just rehashing the typical american view of them.

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It does not matter where the article is from. Just analyze what it is said.

 

The guy is from Just Foreign Policy:

 

Just Foreign Policy is an independent and non-partisan membership organization dedicated to reforming U.S. foreign policy by mobilizing and organizing the broad majority of Americans who want a foreign policy based on diplomacy, law and cooperation.

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Chavez also made that nasty habit of giving heating oil to those who couldn't afford in the richest country in the history of the world because many of our capitalist policies excluded and blamed the poor for not being able to heat their homes.

 

Did Chavez have various issues? Absolutely. Was he the monster most Americans think he is? Hell no.

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Doubtful anyone's opinions change based on comments and references to agenda driven articles. No where is there a mention that Venezuela has also achieved high status based on one of the highest crime rates in the Western Hemisphere. Increases and high incidences of rape, murder and kidnappings. Violent crime has tripled in the past decade. Was he the monster most Americans think?-I guess I take the view that we do not have to always apologize for who we are, so I ask, is America the monster that Chavez continually pointed to in order to unite the masses against the common enemy? Also, unlikely, but maybe his constant hatred towards America is a reason that Americans tended to not like him, along with his courting of Libya, Iran and other tyrannical regimes. I may be a good person but if I singled you out to condemn and attack, would you like me anyways when I tell you all the good things I do?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_Venezuela

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Doubtful anyone's opinions change based on comments and references to agenda driven articles. No where is there a mention that Venezuela has also achieved high status based on one of the highest crime rates in the Western Hemisphere. Increases and high incidences of rape, murder and kidnappings. Violent crime has tripled in the past decade. Was he the monster most Americans think?-I guess I take the view that we do not have to always apologize for who we are, so I ask, is America the monster that Chavez continually pointed to in order to unite the masses against the common enemy? Also, unlikely, but maybe his constant hatred towards America is a reason that Americans tended to not like him, along with his courting of Libya, Iran and other tyrannical regimes. I may be a good person but if I singled you out to condemn and attack, would you like me anyways when I tell you all the good things I do?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crime_in_Venezuela

 

Americans hate him because of perception in media, our government, etc rather than reality. Chavez doesn't hate Americans. He hates american policies and yes he is quite bombastic in expressing that which can be counter-productive.

 

We (the US) also support/enable tyrannical regimes both historically and currently. Not defending the Venezuelan stance, but just putting that into perspective.

 

Also, don't forget that America did sponsor/support/participate in a coup to overthrow Chavez that failed. Can imagine if Venezuela had tried to overthrow the US government?

 

The fact is, he was a multi-times elected democratic leftist leader that did not consolidate his power into a dictatorship/totalitarian regime despite being consistently antagonized by the United States. That's a pretty new experiment in political history and one that ultimately will be viewed as extremely successful in my opinion.

 

He also spurred a revolution in South America that has brought some great leaders to power down there. A criticism could be that he focused too much on S. America as a whole and perhaps ignored issues at home (crime etc).

 

Either way, RIP Chavez and I hope that the next election will go as peacefully as the previous ones.

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Their English feed yes. The English feed is probably the best news agency in the world.

 

Their Arabic feed however is vile and disgusting.

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Their English feed yes. The English feed is probably the best news agency in the world.

 

Their Arabic feed however is vile and disgusting.

 

Their Arabic feed is probably the equivalent of Fox News here.

 

 

They simply do what their big sponsors tell them to do, tbh.

 

 

I'm looking forward to seeing if they can make a real dent stateside. If people simply want news, they will gravitate toward it. If they want political partisian bullshit, they will continue to gravitate to the big 3 out there now.

 

We will see.

 

Hopefully they hire some Will McAvoy types.

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Chavez also made that nasty habit of giving heating oil to those who couldn't afford in the richest country in the history of the world because many of our capitalist policies excluded and blamed the poor for not being able to heat their homes.

 

Did Chavez have various issues? Absolutely. Was he the monster most Americans think he is? Hell no.

 

 

http://www.citgoheatingoil.com/

 

By donating millions of gallons of heating oil, CITGO and its shareholder, Petróleos de Venezuela S.A. (PDVSA), have helped more than 1.7 million people keep warm since 2005.

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