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Cat dials 911 to save life


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COLUMBUS, Ohio - Police aren't sure how else to explain it. But when an officer walked into an apartment Thursday night to answer a 911 call, an orange-and-tan striped cat was lying by a telephone on the living room floor. The cat's owner, Gary Rosheisen, was on the ground near his bed having fallen out of his wheelchair.

 

Rosheisen said his cat, Tommy, must have hit the right buttons to call 911.

 

"I know it sounds kind of weird," Officer Patrick Daugherty said, unsuccessfully searching for some other explanation.

 

Rosheisen said he couldn't get up because of pain from osteoporosis and ministrokes that disrupt his balance. He also wasn't wearing his medical-alert necklace and couldn't reach a cord above his pillow that alerts paramedics that he needs help.

 

Daugherty said police received a 911 call from Rosheisen's apartment, but there was no one on the phone. Police called back to make sure everything was OK, and when no one answered, they decided to check things out.

 

That's when Daugherty found Tommy next to the phone.

 

Rosheisen got the cat three years ago to help lower his blood pressure. He tried to train him to call 911, unsure if the training ever stuck.

 

The phone in the living room is always on the floor, and there are 12 small buttons — including a speed dial for 911 right above the button for the speaker phone.

 

"He's my hero," Rosheisen said.

 

? 2005 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

 

 

msnbc.com

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This happens once every couple of years. Two dogs that I know of have done this in years past.

 

RICHLAND, Wash. - Leana Beasley has faith that a dog is man’s best friend.

 

Faith, a 4-year-old Rottweiler, phoned 911 when Beasley fell out of her wheelchair and barked urgently into the receiver until a dispatcher sent help. Then the service dog unlocked the front door for the police officer.

 

“I sensed there was a problem on the other end of the 911 call,� said dispatcher Jenny Buchanan. “The dog was too persistent in barking directly into the phone receiver. I knew she was trying to tell me something.�

 

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Faith is trained to summon help by pushing a speed-dial button on the phone with her nose after taking the receiver off the hook, said her owner, Beasley, 45, who suffers grand mal seizures.

 

Guided by experts at the Assistance Dog Club of Puget Sound, Beasley helped train Faith herself.

 

The day of the fall, Faith “had been acting very clingy, wanting to be touching me all day long,� Beasley said Thursday.

 

The dog, whose sensitive nose can detect changes in Beasley’s body chemistry, is trained to alert her owner to impending seizures.

 

But that wasn’t what was happening on Sept. 7, and Faith apparently wasn’t sure how to communicate the problem. During Beasley’s three-week hospital stay, doctors determined her liver was not properly processing her seizure medication.

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