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Theoretical Scoring Question.


SongInTheAir
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Okay, I've been wondering this for a few days but I've been far too lazy to write it, but now I'm at work and killing time, so:

 

Let's say that Team A is the visiting team at Team B's ballpark.

Team A scores a run in the top of the first inning.

Team A's starting pitcher pitches only one inning, and then subsequent relievers pitch one inning each.

The game ends 1-0.

Which pitcher gets the Win? It can't be the starter because he didn't go five innings, but how is it decided which reliever gets credit?

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It's up to the official scorer. Here's what the rules say:

 

10.17(b) [if the starter doesn't pitch 5 innings] then the official scorer shall credit as the winning pitcher the relief pitcher, if there is only one relief pitcher, or the relief pitcher who, in the official scorer?s judgment was the most effective, if there is more than one relief pitcher.

Rule 10.17(b) Comment: It is the intent of Rule 10.17(b) that a relief pitcher pitch at least one complete inning or pitch when a crucial out is made, within the context of the game (including the score), in order to be credited as the winning pitcher. If the first relief pitcher pitches effectively, the official scorer should not presumptively credit that pitcher with the win, because the rule requires that the win be credited to the pitcher who was the most effective, and a subsequent relief pitcher may have been most effective. The official scorer, in determining which relief pitcher was the most effective, should consider the number of runs, earned runs and base runners given up by each relief pitcher and the context of the game at the time of each relief pitcher?s appearance. If two or more relief pitchers were similarly effective, the official scorer should give the presumption to the earlier pitcher as the winning pitcher.

( c)The official scorer shall not credit as the winning pitcher a relief pitcher who is ineffective in a brief appearance, when at least one succeeding relief pitcher pitches effectively in helping his team maintain its lead. In such a case, the official scorer shall credit as the winning pitcher the succeeding relief pitcher who was most effective, in the judgment of the official scorer.

Rule 10.17? Comment: The official scorer generally should, but is not required to, consider the appearance of a relief pitcher to be ineffective and brief if such relief pitcher pitches less than one inning and allows two or more earned runs to score (even if such runs are charged to a previous pitcher). Rule 10.17(b) Comment provides guidance on choosing the winning pitcher from among several succeeding relief pitchers.

 

Everything after the "[if the starter doesn't pitch 5 innings]" is straight from the mlb site, including the comments.

 

 

I have my own official scoring question. If a pitcher faces 27 batters and retires them all, but one of the batters hit a dropped foul popup that was ruled an error but was still subsequently retired, is it still a perfect game? There were no baserunners but there was an error. I'd imagine it's a perfect game but I don't know what the exact rule says.

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I have my own official scoring question. If a pitcher faces 27 batters and retires them all, but one of the batters hit a dropped foul popup that was ruled an error but was still subsequently retired, is it still a perfect game? There were no baserunners but there was an error. I'd imagine it's a perfect game but I don't know what the exact rule says.

"An error that does not allow a baserunner, such as a misplayed foul ball, does not spoil a perfect game."

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perfect_game

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It's up to the official scorer. Here's what the rules say:

 

10.17(b) [if the starter doesn't pitch 5 innings] then the official scorer shall credit as the winning pitcher the relief pitcher, if there is only one relief pitcher, or the relief pitcher who, in the official scorer?s judgment was the most effective, if there is more than one relief pitcher.

Rule 10.17(b) Comment: It is the intent of Rule 10.17(b) that a relief pitcher pitch at least one complete inning or pitch when a crucial out is made, within the context of the game (including the score), in order to be credited as the winning pitcher. If the first relief pitcher pitches effectively, the official scorer should not presumptively credit that pitcher with the win, because the rule requires that the win be credited to the pitcher who was the most effective, and a subsequent relief pitcher may have been most effective. The official scorer, in determining which relief pitcher was the most effective, should consider the number of runs, earned runs and base runners given up by each relief pitcher and the context of the game at the time of each relief pitcher?s appearance. If two or more relief pitchers were similarly effective, the official scorer should give the presumption to the earlier pitcher as the winning pitcher.

( c)The official scorer shall not credit as the winning pitcher a relief pitcher who is ineffective in a brief appearance, when at least one succeeding relief pitcher pitches effectively in helping his team maintain its lead. In such a case, the official scorer shall credit as the winning pitcher the succeeding relief pitcher who was most effective, in the judgment of the official scorer.

Rule 10.17? Comment: The official scorer generally should, but is not required to, consider the appearance of a relief pitcher to be ineffective and brief if such relief pitcher pitches less than one inning and allows two or more earned runs to score (even if such runs are charged to a previous pitcher). Rule 10.17(b) Comment provides guidance on choosing the winning pitcher from among several succeeding relief pitchers.

 

Everything after the "[if the starter doesn't pitch 5 innings]" is straight from the mlb site, including the comments.

 

 

I have my own official scoring question. If a pitcher faces 27 batters and retires them all, but one of the batters hit a dropped foul popup that was ruled an error but was still subsequently retired, is it still a perfect game? There were no baserunners but there was an error. I'd imagine it's a perfect game but I don't know what the exact rule says.

 

Reading that got my nipples hard.

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