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Charley name thing going around here


CapeFish
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Whenever a hurricane has had a major impact, any country affected by the storm can request that the name of the hurricane be ?retired? by agreement of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Retiring a name actually means that it cannot be reused for at least 10 years, to facilitate historic references, legal actions, insurance claim activities, etc. and avoid public confusion with another storm of the same name. If that happens, a like gender name is selected in English, Spanish or French for Atlantic Storms.

 

I don't see how it's so obvious Charley is going to be retired. You never know if they'll request to be retired.

 

Floyd was never retired.

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Whenever a hurricane has had a major impact, any country affected by the storm can request that the name of the hurricane be ?retired? by agreement of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Retiring a name actually means that it cannot be reused for at least 10 years, to facilitate historic references, legal actions, insurance claim activities, etc. and avoid public confusion with another storm of the same name. If that happens, a like gender name is selected in English, Spanish or French for Atlantic Storms.

 

I don't see how it's so obvious Charley is going to be retired. You never know if they'll request to be retired.

 

Floyd was never retired.

529401[/snapback]

Charley is the second costliest hurricane in US history...

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Sorry, here is the correction of my mistake.

 

Tampa radar failed just before Charley hit Florida

The Associated Press

Posted on: Friday, August 27, 2004

WASHINGTON ? Documents show that a key weather radar in the Tampa Bay area had mechanical problems and went down the day before Hurricane Charley hit the southwest coast.

 

The radar was restored 14 hours before the hurricane hit Florida.

 

Although backup radars still would have tracked the hurricane as it made landfall in the Punta Gorda area August 13th, experts say they might not have detected any local tornadoes generated by the storm system.

 

The Associated Press learned of the close call with the radar outage when the news service obtained an internal "Bi-Monthly Activity Report" of the National Weather Service.

 

Twenty-six U.S. deaths have been attributed to the storm, which suddenly made a sharp right turn into Florida's west coast, about 70 miles south of the originally projected bull's-eye.

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