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All of Scout.com's "Insider" stuff is free this weekend


Marlins2003

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There's lots more on them. Unfortuntely little or no Marlins stuff (pout) but if you're interested in other team's prospects, pitching coaches, etc., the upcoming 2007 draft, have fun this weekend.

 

I have to run but here's some stuff on Lindstrom and Owens written when they were in the Mets organization. Some interesting background stuff like "why was Lindstrom considered wild?" well maybe it had to do with the fact he pitched all of 2005 (when he got that rep) with a stress fracture in his arm which he got as a starter.

 

Anyways, if you're interested here's the stuff:

 

On Henry Owens

 

http://mets.scout.com/2/520415.html

 

http://mets.scout.com/2/493246.html

 

http://mets.scout.com/2/494603.html

 

Blurbs on Owens and Lindstrom

 

Matt Lindstrom, RHP, Mets*: The Mets' infatuation with keeping him in the rotation has arguably kept Lindstrom from reaching his potential already. Armed with one of the best power arms in all of minor league baseball, routinely hitting in the high-90's with his fastball, Lindstrom compliments it with a power slider that sits 85-86 MPH. He pitched the entire 2005 season with a stress fracture in his pitching arm which effected his control, so he gets a pass on his disappointing year. He finally appears set to remain in the bullpen in 2006 where he could flourish as a setup man.

 

Q&A with B-Mets Pitching Coach Mark Brewer

Date: Jun 30, 2006

 

*Inside Pitch*: Any thoughts on Matt Lindstrom being selected to play in

the All-Star Future's Game?

 

*Brewer*: There's another guy fitting into the category of something

special. You just don't see a guy throw 98-101 MPH very often. You just

don't see it hardly ever at all. It wasn't surprising to me and I'm very

happy for him. It's an avenue that he's created for himself to get a

chance to be a future star in the big leagues.

 

*Inside Pitch*: Closer Henry Owens

has just been tremendous since coming back from the injury that sidelined him for over

a month. What more does he have to do to prove he's ready for the next

level?

 

*Brewer*: It's simple -- we just need to see him healthy for an extended

period of time.

 

*Inside Pitch*: How has the development of his secondary pitches been

coming along?

 

*Brewer*: Pretty good. His slider is awesome and he's thinking about a

changeup. We're still in the process of thinking if that's the right

pitch to go to.

 

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The outtakes above are not from the links. The links are interviews,etc.

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Thanks for the research.

 

Owens intrigues me, Lindstrom not so much.

"Armed with one of the best power arms in all of minor league baseball, routinely hitting in the high-90's with his fastball, Lindstrom compliments it with a power slider that sits 85-86 MPH."

 

that sure as hell intrigues me.

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Thanks for the research.

 

Owens intrigues me, Lindstrom not so much.

"Armed with one of the best power arms in all of minor league baseball, routinely hitting in the high-90's with his fastball, Lindstrom compliments it with a power slider that sits 85-86 MPH."

 

that sure as hell intrigues me.

 

That was written before last season, when the 26 year old Lindstrom was about to start his 5th season at A ball.

 

A BALL.

 

His limited work at AA late last season screams inconsistency. He kept the ball in the ballpark and had a very high K/9, but his WHIP was very very high (1.38) and his K/BB ratio was 3:1, not glistening for a power pitcher, especially out of the bullpen.

 

Put it this way, if he were 23, we're looking at one of the most intriguing bullpen prospects in baseball, but he's going to be 27 next season and he's only had limited experience at AA...that's bad.

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That was written before last season, when the 26 year old Lindstrom was about to start his 5th season at A ball.

...

He's been a pro since 22 though.

...

Put it this way, if he were 23, we're looking at one of the most intriguing bullpen prospects in baseball, but he's going to be 27 next season and he's only had limited experience at AA...that's bad.

Not quite sure I get it completely, but if he was a 23 year old who had spent 5 seasons in A ball that would be ok? Give the guy a chance. Some people get it late. And ultimately, it's difficult to imagine him being significantly worse than the place he might take in the bullpen.

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