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Article on players who have cleared waivers


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c/o ESPN.com

By Jayson Stark

ESPN.com

 

Well, we can put those Carlos Beltran trade rumors to bed for the last time. Say goodnight, Carlos.

 

 

And any teams thinking they could deal for Danny Bautista or Frank Catalanotto to solve their post-deadline outfield problems? Sorry. Not happening.

 

It's now safe for Roger Clemens, Paul Wilson, Ramon Ortiz and Jorge Julio to unpack for the rest of the year, too. Because we know now they failed to navigate their journey through the waiver-wire forest without being claimed.

 

 

All of those names made it into many a conversation before the trading deadline last month. But even though numerous sources indicate that more players are flying through waivers this month than they've seen in years, some of the most talked-about names were claimed and pulled back.

 

 

Those seven players we've mentioned so far fit into that category. So we can now delete them from Rumor Central for the final time. Congratulations, men. It's safe to breathe again.

 

 

As for Randy Johnson, Ugueth Urbina and Jose Mesa, uh, not so fast.

 

 

Those three are among the hundreds of players who hadn't even been placed on waivers at last check. So while it may not be any more likely to see them moved in August than it was in July, stay tuned.

 

 

But that brings us to the group of players who can be traded this month with no fuss, no muss and (theoretically) no messy paperwork. We've pieced together this list of players who did make it through waivers, as best we can determine. We assume the Rumor Central staff is assembling their head shots as we speak.

 

 

 

Bret Boone is close to reaching enough plate appearances to guarantee $9 million next year.

 

 

PITCHERS WHO CAN BE TRADED

 

 

Darrell May

Brian Anderson

Buddy Groom

Justin Speier

Elmer Dessens

Jason Grimsley

Al Levine

Steve Sparks

Gabe White

 

 

OUTFIELD BATS WHO CAN BE TRADED

 

 

B.J. Surhoff

Richard Hidalgo

Raul Ibanez

Jose Cruz Jr.

Robert Fick

Ben Grieve

Dmitri Young

John Vander Wal

 

 

(Then there's a second category of players who made it through, but are less likely to go anywhere, since they're still assuming reasonably regular roles on assorted contenders. That list includes:)

 

 

Kenny Lofton

Carl Everett

Ruben Sierra

Terrence Long

Brian Jordan

Jay Payton

 

 

OTHER BATS WHO CAN BE TRADED

 

 

Bret Boone

Tino Martinez

Shea Hillenbrand

Mike Sweeney

Placido Polanco

Geoff Blum

Charles Johnson

 

 

Quite a few of these guys come with various contract issues, of course. Johnson still has that pesky no-trade clause, which he already has invoked once. Anderson would be owed an extra half-million bucks if he's traded. Sweeney, Ibanez, Cruz, Boone, Young and May (among others) have hefty contracts or vesting options that carry them beyond this year.

 

 

And then there are guys like Lofton and Polanco, who seemed dispensable a couple of weeks ago but don't anymore -- because of injuries and other assorted developments.

 

 

Somewhere in there, though, are enough names to guarantee that Admin Walker, Roberto Alomar and Cory Lidle won't be the only players calling moving vans this month.

 

 

"I think you'll see a handful of moves, but nothing drastic," said an assistant GM of one contender that would love to add both a bat and a bullpen arm. "This is one of those years where the kind of guys who are available aren't head and shoulders above what most of us have already got, with just a couple of exceptions."

 

One guy that caught my eye was Tino Martinez. If Enc continues to struggle, he would be a nice pickup. Stick him at first base and move Conine and Cabs back to their original positions.

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For those of us who don't know how all the trading stuff works...can u give a brief overview of what waivers are.

 

Thanks

512345[/snapback]

 

A player that is put on waivers is available for any team in the Majors to pick up, but they pick up his entire contract. When he is put on waivers for their unconditional release and nobody picks them up, a team has 10 days to either release or trade them. So for example, last year, Jeff Conine was put on waivers by Baltimore, but no team wanted to pick up his contract... So the Marlins were able to trade for him.

 

The players this article mentions, I don't believe were put on waivers for their unconditional release. I think teams do this after the 7/31 deadline to see if they can let some of their salaries go by basically offering them to other teams for nothing. If a team wants to trade for one of these players, now they know that they can.

 

This is how I understand it anyways. If anyone else knows the process better, please elaborate or correct me... :D

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For those of us who don't know how all the trading stuff works...can u give a brief overview of what waivers are.

 

Thanks

512345[/snapback]

 

A player that is put on waivers is available for any team in the Majors to pick up, but they pick up his entire contract. When he is put on waivers for their unconditional release and nobody picks them up, a team has 10 days to either release or trade them. So for example, last year, Jeff Conine was put on waivers by Baltimore, but no team wanted to pick up his contract... So the Marlins were able to trade for him.

 

The players this article mentions, I don't believe were put on waivers for their unconditional release. I think teams do this after the 7/31 deadline to see if they can let some of their salaries go by basically offering them to other teams for nothing. If a team wants to trade for one of these players, now they know that they can.

 

This is how I understand it anyways. If anyone else knows the process better, please elaborate or correct me... :D

512370[/snapback]

 

 

yeah, this is basically it, but not exactly. what happens after the deadling is not a waiver for unconditional release, it's a waiver to assign a player's rights. in effect, it is equivalent to when a team is looking to send a verteran player down to AAA ball, but first they must offer him to anyone else in the league. when a team places a player on waivers after the trading deadline, they are checking to see if any team in the league (with preference going to the teams with the worst record) would be interested in "claiming" that player and assuming his rights as well as the remainder of his salary. if a claim is made, the waiving team has 2 options - 1) retract their waiver and keep the player, 2) give the player and his full remaining contract to that team.

 

if no other team makes a claim on that player in 48 hours, that player has "cleared waivers". at this point, the team has effectively gained permission from the rest of the league to assign this player's rights to another squad, and so the player can be traded anywhere in the league in exchange for any other player who has also cleared waivers (or minor leaguers, or cash).

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