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Quick Q on Cabs


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this offseason will be the first year he is will be arby eligible right?

 

so he is in the Marlins control for the next 4 years right?

 

the media guide says his contract is done this year?... Im guessing that just means that now we must negotiate with him right?

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Guest Juanky

Actually, I believe he stays at his current salaray this year and next year, and is arbitration eligible after his third full season.

 

I'm not 100% on this but that's what I recall seeing in the off season.

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Actually, I believe he stays at his current salaray this year and next year, and is arbitration eligible after his third full season.

 

I'm not 100% on this but that's what I recall seeing in the off season.

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You may be correct (how's that for be difinitive lolol).

 

If you remember when he came up there was the usual bad-mouthing by the press of the then fledgling Marlins ownership because they waited for a certain threshold date to pass before bringing either or both Cabrera and Willis up to the bigs.

 

In answer to an earlier question regarding Cabrera's contract, all players at his stage in his baseball career are signed to one year contracts. That is why the media guide represents his as such. Nothing to be alarmed at.

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Guest Juanky

Here's the language I found:

 

The arbitration system depends on accurately calculating the service time of the player in Major League Baseball. The time is measured in years.

 

From years of service 0-2, teams can unilaterally pay their players whatever they want, constrained only by the minimum salary. The players are ineligible for arbitration. (Exceptions are made for certain players known as "Super 2's" who are in the top 17% of seniority for their year; they are given arbitration rights.)

 

From years of service 3 and up, teams can choose to offer arbitration to any of their players whose contracts have expired. If the player accepts an arbitration offer, the parties thereby agree to a one-year contract, with the salary to be decided by a neutral arbitrator. If the team does not offer arbitration, the player becomes a free agent and the team loses the right to negotiate with him until May 1 of the following season.

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Here's the language I found:

 

The arbitration system depends on accurately calculating the service time of the player in Major League Baseball. The time is measured in years.

 

From years of service 0-2, teams can unilaterally pay their players whatever they want, constrained only by the minimum salary. The players are ineligible for arbitration. (Exceptions are made for certain players known as "Super 2's" who are in the top 17% of seniority for their year; they are given arbitration rights.)

 

From years of service 3 and up, teams can choose to offer arbitration to any of their players whose contracts have expired. If the player accepts an arbitration offer, the parties thereby agree to a one-year contract, with the salary to be decided by a neutral arbitrator. If the team does not offer arbitration, the player becomes a free agent and the team loses the right to negotiate with him until May 1 of the following season.

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That language seems to imply to me that he's going to arby this year.

 

Time for a six year deal?

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Guest Juanky

Here's the language from MLB.com (previous was from Wikipedia)

 

Salary Arbitration

Language remains the same as in the 1996 collective bargaining agreement. Any player with three years of service and less than six years of service at the Major League level can file. An arbitrator picks the dollar figure submited by the player or the one submitted by the club. The decision is binding.

Three years of service is up for interpretation.

 

The main issue here is:

 

Is a year defined as the time between Opening Day and the end of the regular season? Or is a year defined as the time between the day said player was called up (in case this was midseason, as we are wondering at the moment) until that date three years later?

 

If it's the former, then there is a second question - does it count as a year of service if you weren't on the Opening Day roster? Or can you join later on and it count as a year?

 

If it is defined as date of callup until the anniversary of the callup, then we are safe until offseason 2006. However, if it is defined as playing in that season at all marks it as a year of service, then he is eligible this offseason.

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Cabrera won't become arbitration eligible until after the 2006 season. We've talked about this previously. His 2003 season does not count as a "full season." He had to be brought up before some date, and he wasn't. This is why ESPN jokingly predicted that he would become a Yankee for the 2010 season.

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