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OPEC decides you are getting too good of a deal on gas, cuts output


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OPEC on Wednesday deepened its links with major non-OPEC producer Russia and said it was cutting back output by around half a million barrels per day.

 

Analysts said the group was seeking to support prices at around $100 after prices have plunged from a record of more than $147 in July to a five-month low below $102 on Tuesday.

 

AP

 

Ministers of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) had been widely expected to stick to existing production allocations, which have been in place all year and are still theoretically unchanged.

 

There had been expectations real supply above targets would be discreetly pared back, although few had expected any change to be made public.

 

OPEC President Chakib Khelil said Wednesday's decision amounted to a cut from the group's actual July output.

 

"I think if you do your own calculation properly, it will be a lowering of production by about 520,000 barrels per day," Khelil said.

 

U.S. crude prices initially rose by around a dollar, but later slipped to around $103 a barrel, almost unchanged from the previous close.

 

Russia Moves Closer

 

The other surprise was that major energy producer Russia, which attends OPEC conferences as an observer, sent a very senior official, the influential deputy prime minister Igor Sechin.

 

Analysts linked his attendance to tension between Russia and the West over Moscow's conflict with Georgia.

 

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Russia's energy ministry said Russia wanted to hold regular dialogue with OPEC and had invited representatives to Moscow for a meeting in October.

 

In the past, Russia has agreed to trim production in line with OPEC output cuts to support prices.

 

Khelil's estimation of how much output will be removed from the market derived from amounts OPEC members were really producing, rather than agreed limits.

 

OPEC's new production ceiling is 28.8 million bpd, compared with its earlier target of 29.67 million bpd, ministers said.

 

But because Indonesia's membership is suspended from Jan. 1, its allocation has been subtracted, meaning the output ceiling is essentially unchanged.

 

"The communique is much as expected," said Paul Horsnell of Barclays Capital. "However, it also talks of strictly adhering to quotas, when we might have expected the trimming back in coming months to be done more discreetly."

 

Others agreed the only surprise element was that OPEC has made public its intention to remove supply above agreed limits.

 

"The statement is clear as mud, but really what it says is members should keep to quota, which basically means Saudi Arabia should stop the additional barrels that it has provided over the summer, which was somehow expected," said Olivier Jakob of Petromatrix.

 

"I would say it's only half of a surprise because they have made a formal announcement."

 

Targets vs. Actual Production

 

OPEC was estimated to be pumping roughly 790,000 bpd above its agreed target, the bulk of which came from Saudi Arabia.

 

R

At a specially convened meeting in Jeddah in June, the leading exporter announced unilaterally that it would pump 9.7 million bpd, around 750,000 bpd above its agreed ceiling.

 

The kingdom said it was responding to strong consumption and a senior Gulf source said on Tuesday he expected it to continue producing at around 9.7 million bpd if demand held steady.

 

"The market is fairly well-balanced and we have worked very hard since the June meeting to bring prices to where they are now. I think we have been very successful," Saudi Oil Minister Ali al-Naimi told reporters on arrival in Vienna on Tuesday.

 

He has yet to comment following OPEC's output decision, which was announced at around 3 a.m. New York time on Wednesday morning following a meeting that did not begin until after 10 p.m. on Tuesday because of Ramadan fasting.

 

Ahead of the conference, most OPEC ministers had seemed broadly happy with the oil price and had indicated there was probably no need for urgent action, although some -- including Iran, Libya, Venezuela and Algeria?said there was a risk the market could become oversupplied.

 

"While we believe that Saudi Arabia would be perfectly happy with prices in the $90 to $100 range, it seems that other OPEC members wished to give a slightly stronger signal. For those members, it appears that the $100 level is shaping up as a sort of soft floor," Horsnell said.

 

OPEC will further review its production policy at a meeting in Algeria on Dec. 17.

 

http://www.cnbc.com/id/26632977

 

 

 

looks like some OPEC nations want to keep there stranglehold on our economy, we need to bump up the alternative energies pronto.

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This is a textbook reason for why more domestic drilling would be a waste of money and resources. OPEC can erase any increase in our domestic production by decreasing their own. They have far more leverage over the global oil supply than we would even with an oil derrick in everyone's backyard.

 

 

Drilling for more oil is a stopgap measure until more alternative sources begin to be used in this country. Nuclear especially is a great one, except for the fact that they become targets for terrorism. However, the fact that drilling is not a long term solution, or that the impacts wont be felt for at least several years are not reasons not to do it.

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This is a textbook reason for why more domestic drilling would be a waste of money and resources. OPEC can erase any increase in our domestic production by decreasing their own. They have far more leverage over the global oil supply than we would even with an oil derrick in everyone's backyard.

 

 

Drilling for more oil is a stopgap measure until more alternative sources begin to be used in this country. Nuclear especially is a great one, except for the fact that they become targets for terrorism. However, the fact that drilling is not a long term solution, or that the impacts wont be felt for at least several years are not reasons not to do it.

I would rather that we build some nuclear plants, if that's what it takes to have a stopgap measure until something better comes along. However, we need to figure out some way to dispose of nuclear waste besides burying it.

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This is a textbook reason for why more domestic drilling would be a waste of money and resources. OPEC can erase any increase in our domestic production by decreasing their own. They have far more leverage over the global oil supply than we would even with an oil derrick in everyone's backyard.

 

 

Drilling for more oil is a stopgap measure until more alternative sources begin to be used in this country. Nuclear especially is a great one, except for the fact that they become targets for terrorism. However, the fact that drilling is not a long term solution, or that the impacts wont be felt for at least several years are not reasons not to do it.

I would rather that we build some nuclear plants, if that's what it takes to have a stopgap measure until something better comes along. However, we need to figure out some way to dispose of nuclear waste besides burying it.

 

Good luck with that, radioactive elements have such a long life that its very very hard to dispose of them by any other means. I mean maybe the burial storage method can be improved to prevent leaks. Nuclear power isn't a stop gap, it IS a long term solution. It can provide a hell of a lot more power than wind or solar, so when long term alternatives are discussed thats one of them. The other is natural gas, but thats also a nonrenewable resource, so it has its limits.

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It's not a huge surprise really. Drastic price manipulations will only hasten our quest for independence even more so.

I agree that has to be behind their decision making process.

 

 

It isn't to the Saudi's benefit to be for this. The Saudi don't want to piss the U.S. off because we are the source of their riches. We're going to try to attain independence regardless, but as long as we're buying petroleum, they want us to buy from them.

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