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The hitting stats for the Marlins AAA players is way overated and alot of people give them to much weight. Havent we learned this from Chris Aguila, Eric Reed, Brett Caroll, Jason Wood, Joe Dillon....... All of these guys absolutely killed the ball in Alb. and didnt do a dam thing int he majors. So calling for Mcpherson based on his AAA stats is a waste of breath.

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When Dallas McPherson hit three homeruns in one game the other night he did so in a park with a 415 ft centerfield and at an elevation roughly the equivalent of Kansas City Missouri or Cleveland Ohio. The PCL today is made up of teams all the way to the east coast, and there is really only a handful or so with outrageous elevations. Plus take a look at the locations of the teams in the Isotopes' division (where they play half+ their games) and you'll be even more surprised.

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The hitting stats for the Marlins AAA players is way overated and alot of people give them to much weight. Havent we learned this from Chris Aguila, Eric Reed, Brett Caroll, Jason Wood, Joe Dillon....... All of these guys absolutely killed the ball in Alb. and didnt do a dam thing int he majors. So calling for Mcpherson based on his AAA stats is a waste of breath.

You mean the glorified softball league better known as the PCL?

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When Dallas McPherson hit three homeruns in one game the other night he did so in a park with a 415 ft centerfield and at an elevation roughly the equivalent of Kansas City Missouri or Cleveland Ohio. The PCL today is made up of teams all the way to the east coast, and there is really only a handful or so with outrageous elevations. Plus take a look at the locations of the teams in the Isotopes' division (where they play half+ their games) and you'll be even more surprised.

 

With all due respect my friend, we are going to have to disagree on this one for now. I see the PCL as hitter friendly.

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When Dallas McPherson hit three homeruns in one game the other night he did so in a park with a 415 ft centerfield and at an elevation roughly the equivalent of Kansas City Missouri or Cleveland Ohio. The PCL today is made up of teams all the way to the east coast, and there is really only a handful or so with outrageous elevations. Plus take a look at the locations of the teams in the Isotopes' division (where they play half+ their games) and you'll be even more surprised.

 

With all due respect my friend, we are going to have to disagree on this one for now. I see the PCL as hitter friendly.

 

I'm simply pointing out that the belief that the PCL is solely populated with high elevation teams that result in flawed or exaggerated hitting stats is no longer true. I was bowled over when I looked at how the PCL had grown geographically all the way to Nashville and Memphis Tenn in the east and New Orleans in the south (one of the four teams in the Isotopes division and actually 4.5 below sea level, an aberration certainly), and yes there are the Colorados and the 'Topes themselves and a handful of others but on the whole elevation is not exclusively the determining factor in why BA and other hitting stats are so high.

 

The reasons for hitter-friendliness have more to do with park size (of some of the older stadiums in the league, the newer ones are much closer to being MLB equivalent) and the movement at the major league level to bring up kids as fast as they can, by-passing what years ago was a normal progression through the minors with two years in AAA and jumping from a season or less in AA ball directly to the bigs. That's why you see so many older pitchers in the PCL, no longer being prospects, because of age or their competitive history, they wind up there out of the way of players on the fast track.

 

As for McPherson's homeruns I wanted to make the point this was a legitimate offensive explosion in a ballpark that was more or less the equivalent of a number of major league parks in size and elevation rather than in Albuquerque or Colorado (+5,000 ft elevation) that undoubtedly would have mitigated the value of a three homerun night. Bob, we really don't have anything to argue over except perhaps why we see what we see stats-wise.

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