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Idiot judge sentences a serial child rapist to only 60 days in jail


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Judge Sentences Serial Rapist to Mere 60 Days Jail Time

By Jim Kouri, CPP

MichNews.com

Jan 10, 2006

 

 

 

A Vermont judge sentenced a man who repeatedly raped a 6-year old girl for four years to a jail term of 60 days, shocking the entire city of Burlington.

 

Mark Hulett, who admitted to repeatedly sexually abused a child over a four-year period, got a slap on the wrist in a Vermont courtroom this week and will be free to walk the streets in as few as 60 days, according to the Burlington Free Press.

 

He sexually assaulted the girl for years, beginning when she was only 6 until she was 10, according to the prosecutor. The prosecution wanted at least an eight year sentence, and says he could have received life in prison.

 

However, Corrections Department officials said they were unable to provide psychiatric or psychological treatment to Hulett in jail. Judge Edward Cashman then decided to set the jail term at a minimum of 60 days.

 

Judge Cashman defended his ruling by saying that without treatment, a long jail term would only harden Hulett and make him more dangerous when he is released. He seemed to feel that decision would keep society safer from this offender's sexual deviancy in the long run.

 

"This judge has got to go. It's appalling that he's so concerned over the treatment of a sexual predator who sexually assaulted a little girl over and over and over again," says former New York City Police Department sex crimes detective Sid Francis, who now runs a private detective agency.

 

"The people of Vermont have got to dump this judge. He's dangerous," added the decorated cop.

 

Numerous studies on rehabilitation of sexual predators -- especially child predators -- strongly suggested that sex offenders very rarely get rehabilitated.

 

In a previous case, Judge Cashman threw out a drunk driving charge on an alleged technicality, prompting the prosecutors to request such cases not go before Judge Cashman.

 

Cashman claims punishment doesn't work. But critics say he's supposed to apply the law, not base decisions on his personal views.

 

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Jim Kouri, CPP is currently fifth vice-president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police.

 

http://www.michnews.com/artman/publish/article_11201.shtml

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The point here is that jails are for rehabilitation, not punishment (or at least not entirely). The idea is that a criminal, after serving his/her sentence, is rehabilitated and can safely be released. If the judge feels that the individuals mental problems would only make him a more dangerous person upon release (8, 10 years down the road) then I don't see the problem in his ruling, granted the individual should be monitored (maybe house arrest?).

 

What use is keeping someone in jail 10 years if you feel they will go out and commit the crime again? People need to stop seeing jail strictly as punishment.

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The point here is that jails are for rehabilitation, not punishment (or at least not entirely). The idea is that a criminal, after serving his/her sentence, is rehabilitated and can safely be released. If the judge feels that the individuals mental problems would only make him a more dangerous person upon release (8, 10 years down the road) then I don't see the problem in his ruling, granted the individual should be monitored (maybe house arrest?).

 

What use is keeping someone in jail 10 years if you feel they will go out and commit the crime again? People need to stop seeing jail strictly as punishment.

 

Because they are, for that period of their life not a danger to the public as a whole. The public would like rehabilitation, but if that isn't going to happen, knowing they are in prison where they cannot do any further harm for a set period is better than them being free to continue to offend.

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definitely ... he obviously is likely to commit the crime during the next "x" amount of years

 

will he be rehabilitated on the way out? - maybe not, but will he be abusing little kids over that span? - definitely not

 

who knows, the longer in jail, the more possibility that his child raping antics piss off some lifer who decides to just kill him - which would be the best case

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definitely ... he obviously is likely to commit the crime during the next "x" amount of years

 

will he be rehabilitated on the way out? - maybe not, but will he be abusing little kids over that span? - definitely not

 

who knows, the longer in jail, the more possibility that his child raping antics piss off some lifer who decides to just kill him - which would be the best case

 

 

If this bastard does walk and does eventually commit a similar crime, is there any precedent for suing the judge and holding him liable for failing to incarcerate and thus putting the public in danger?

 

:mischief2

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