Jump to content

Gatlin accepts 8 year ban


Ramp

Recommended Posts

Sprinter Justin Gatlin agreed to an eight-year ban from track and field Tuesday, avoiding a lifetime penalty in exchange for his cooperation with doping authorities and because of the "exceptional circumstances" surrounding his first positive drug test.

 

He will forfeit the world record he tied in May, when he ran the 100 meters in 9.77 seconds.

 

Gatlin tested positive in April for testosterone or other steroids. In making the agreement with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, Gatlin can still appeal to an arbitration panel in the next six months to have the term reduced.

 

He cannot, however, argue that the test was faulty.

 

"To his credit, it's recognition that the science is reliable," USADA general counsel Travis Tygart told The Associated Press. "Instead of wasting a bunch of resources attempting to create smoke where there's not any, he's acknowledging the accuracy of the positive test, and in exchange for his agreement to cooperate, we've recognized the nature of his first offense."

 

The sprinter's first offense came while he was in college and tested positive for banned medicine he was taking to control attention-deficit disorder. He received a two-year ban for that test.

 

Gatlin has said he didn't know how steroids got into his system this time.

 

His coach, Trevor Graham, who has been involved with at least a half-dozen athletes who have received drug suspensions, has contended Gatlin tested positive after a vengeful massage therapist used testosterone cream on the runner without his knowledge.

 

Gatlin's attorney hasn't acknowledged that allegation.

 

Under the World Anti-Doping Agency code, a second offense calls for a lifetime ban.

 

At age 24, an eight-year ban would pretty much knock Gatlin out of competition for life. Still, USADA looks at this as a significant compromise -- and the arbitration process could bring Gatlin back much sooner than eight years.

 

"He accepted liability," Tygart said. "He agreed not to raise technical arguments or frivolous defenses. "He has an opportunity to go to a panel of arbitrators and argue exceptional circumstances."

 

Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press

 

link

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gatlin agrees to eight-year ban

Gatlin agrees to eight-year ban

 

By EDDIE PELLS, AP National Writer

August 22, 2006

 

Sprinter Justin Gatlin agreed to an eight-year ban from track and field Tuesday, avoiding a lifetime penalty in exchange for his cooperation with doping authorities and because his first positive drug test was deemed an honest mistake.

 

He will forfeit the world record he tied in May, when he ran the 100 meters in 9.77 seconds. At age 24, the lengthy ban would all but knock Gatlin out of competition for the rest of his life.

 

ADVERTISEMENT

 

 

 

 

Gatlin tested positive in April for testosterone or other steroids, five years after his first positive test, which was for medicine to control attention-deficit disorder. Under the World Anti-Doping Agency code, a second doping offense calls for a lifetime ban.

 

But Gatlin reached a compromise with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, which levies doping penalties in America. Under terms of the compromise, he can still appeal to an arbitration panel in the next six months to have the term reduced.

 

He cannot, however, argue that the test was faulty.

 

"To his credit, it's recognition that the science is reliable," USADA general counsel Travis Tygart told The Associated Press. "Instead of wasting a bunch of resources attempting to create smoke where there's not any, he's acknowledging the accuracy of the positive test, and in exchange for his agreement to cooperate, we've recognized the nature of his first offense."

 

That offense came while Gatlin was in college. He stopped taking the ADD medicine a few days before competition, but it did not clear his system. He received a two-year ban for that test, which was reduced by a year because of the "exceptional circumstances" of the offense.

 

"The nature of Gatlin's first offense for use of his medication puts this violation in a unique category," said USADA chief executive officer Terry Madden.

 

Gatlin has said he didn't know how steroids got into his system this time.

 

His coach, Trevor Graham, who's been involved with at least a half-dozen athletes who've received drug suspensions, has contended Gatlin tested positive after a vengeful massage therapist used testosterone cream on the runner without his knowledge.

 

Gatlin's attorney, Cameron Myler, hasn't acknowledged that allegation. She did not immediately return messages left by the AP.

 

"While we are glad Justin has taken responsibility for his positive test and will cooperate in USADA's anti-doping efforts, we are sorely disappointed in him," Craig Masback, USA Track and Field's chief executive officer, said in a statement.

 

USADA looks at this as a significant compromise -- and the arbitration process could bring Gatlin back much sooner than eight years.

 

USADA has a history of offering leniency to those who help in its fight against doping. Though the agency doesn't name names, Gatlin could possibly help USADA by providing information on Graham, who has denied any direct involvement with performance-enhancing drugs.

 

"He accepted liability," Tygart said. "He agreed not to raise technical arguments or frivolous defenses. He has an opportunity to go to a panel of arbitrators and argue exceptional circumstances."

In this case, the exceptional circumstances could be that he was sabotaged, or has no idea how the steroids entered his system.

 

 

http://sports.yahoo.com/sa/news?slug=ap-ga...p&type=lgns

 

he still might have a chance to come back earlier if corroborates with the investigation

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh please, a world class athlete like Gatlin knows exactly what's going into his body. I'm a big fatass and I know what I put inside my body. He did the crime, now he's gotta do the crime. This is a real shame though that he got busted, I really enjoyed watching him run. I guess it's time for Xavier Carter to step up and become our next great sprinter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Question, what good does an eight year ban do? I mean, he'll be beyond his prime at that point, or would a lifetime ban also extend beyond being a racer e.g. coach.

 

 

From the article:

At age 24, an eight-year ban would pretty much knock Gatlin out of competition for life. Still, USADA looks at this as a significant compromise -- and the arbitration process could bring Gatlin back much sooner than eight years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Man, that's a shame. First montgomery, now gatlin and marion jones.

 

Micheal Johnson, please put on your golden shoes and come out of retirement.

 

he did it too...there's not a single track and field star in the last 30 years that didn't

IMO they should just allow it in track and field...it's necessary to compete and the labs are always one step ahead of the testers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Man, that's a shame. First montgomery, now gatlin and marion jones.

 

Micheal Johnson, please put on your golden shoes and come out of retirement.

 

he did it too...there's not a single track and field star in the last 30 years that didn't

IMO they should just allow it in track and field...it's necessary to compete and the labs are always one step ahead of the testers

yeah, lets allow it in High School as well. :plain

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



×
×
  • Create New...