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Need legal advice..... F_M, TSwift??


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I switched from Verizon to Cingular wireless about 2-3 days ago. Well i've got the Equifax 3-in-1 credit alert service so anytime anything happens to my credit I receive an e-mail notification. So yesterday I receive an e-mail notification saying that yesterday saying that an inquiry was made to my credit report by Cingular Wireless and my credit score dropped 16 points from 735 to 719. I NEVER authorized Cingular to make an inquiry into my credit report and they had no right to do it.

 

I called Equifax for advice and they told me I have to have Cingular send a letter by certified mail to all 3 credit bureau's explaining that they made an unauthorized inquiry and it needs to be removed from my credit report and my score needs to be reverted back to what it was before the inquiry. Well the problem is I went into Cingular and they were absolute bastards about it, denied any wrong doing, said it was company policy, etc. I explained to them that it's ILLEGAL FOR THEM TO CHECK MY CREDIT WITHOUT ME AUTHORIZING IT, but this low level store manager just played dumb.

 

Cingular has a 30 day contract cancellation policy so I cancelled my contract and I returned the phone and all accessories and went back to Verizon, I am just disgusted with Cingular. I called up Cingular corporate offices and just got transferred around to a hundred different people none of whom knew jack sh*t.

 

I leave for Marine Corps boot camp in 44 days, I have more important things to deal with than some bulls*** like this with Cingular because they f***ed up my credit report and score.

 

What can I do to get this removed from my credit report? It was unauthorized, they never informed me they were going to check my credit it, and i'm completely in the right on this but "the system" is just f***ing me over because nobody knows anything. I know that there are a bunch of consumer protection laws and things like that which would easily be able to straighten this sh*t out, but I don't have the money for a lawyer to be able to enforce any of them.

 

ANy advice is appreciated, thanks in advance, i'm hoping F_M, TSwift, or one of the other people in here who are in law school might have some advice.

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It's actually a very common practice to check a person's credit whenever that person applies for a new subscription service (phone, power, etc). Since you'll be paying once-a-month for services rendered in advance, you are, in essence, applying for credit.

 

Read the fine print on the document you signed when you got the phone. Does it say something like...

 

Wireless service is subject to credit approval.

 

or...

 

We may obtain information about you from outside sources and add it to or combine it with your account information. For example, we may receive credit information for purposes of initiating service. ...

http://www.cingular.com/privacy

 

If so, then that's them legally informing you of the procedure.

 

But, don't fret about your score. 719 is actually pretty good for a man your age. And if you don't apply for any more credit in the next 12 months, it'll come back up.

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Where's your contract?

 

If you have it handy, check for what Beetle was talking about. Pretty much a stone cold lock that you'll find one of those two phrases in there. And if they are, there's your authorization.

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It's already been said but Id check every last document that you signed to make sure you didn't authorize anything. I don't think the fact that it always happens to other people necessarily gives them authorization to do it now to you. They have to get your authorization in some form or another I image. It probably depends on Florida credit laws.

 

As for what recourse you have, have you tried contacting the Better Business Bureau? They should be able to help you in some form or another. I also would continue to harass the company until they send a letter..that is if you definitely didn't authorize it.

 

Also, check out this link:

http://www.stateofflorida.com/Portal/Deskt...t.aspx?tabid=57

 

Has extensive info on complaints you can file and people you can contact. I really think the BBB can help you the most in terms of advice.

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FWIW - a credit inquiry leaves your credit score after 6 months. Also, a credit inquiry alone is not enough to drop your credit score by that much. I suppose it is epossible that canceling your older account plus adding a newer account plus the inquiry had a marginal effect on your credit. Just remember - a big part of your score is the average age of your accounts.

 

As stated - you have no significant legal recourse. Suck it up, soldier.

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FWIW - a credit inquiry leaves your credit score after 6 months. Also, a credit inquiry alone is not enough to drop your credit score by that much. I suppose it is epossible that canceling your older account plus adding a newer account plus the inquiry had a marginal effect on your credit. Just remember - a big part of your score is the average age of your accounts.

 

As stated - you have no significant legal recourse. Suck it up, soldier.

So in 6 months this will be wiped from my credit report and my score will automatically go back up?

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So in 6 months this will be wiped from my credit report and my score will automatically go back up?

Any "damage" done as a result of the inquiry will be gone after 6 months.

 

You will not recover from losing an old account as quickly, though. That's why I always advise people to keep whatever their oldest accounts are active. If it's a savings account your parents started, keep $500 in it, if it's your first college credit card with a 26% APR, threaten to cancel and they will reduce your rate when they see an older account in good standing...

 

Here's some further information on the subject:

The score is determined by a variety of factors, each of which makes up a portion of the score:

  • Approximately one third of the score represents the individual's payment history. Previous loans, and the ability to pay them are shown in this portion of the score. Both late payments and failure to pay at all affect this portion of the score. Those who have paid all of his or her loans on time will obtain the highest scores.
     
  • Another third of the score is determined by current debts, and the ratio of debt to the amount of available credit. Keeping all of your credit cards at or near their limits will hurt this portion of the score. This seems obvious; those who are already near their credit limits may have trouble paying back any future loans.
     
  • The remaining third of the credit score is determined by three factors; length of credit history, recent credit applications, and the types of overall credit in the individual's credit history. The length of the credit history is the most significant item, as lenders are more suspicious of borrowers who have not established a pattern of borrowing and repaying loans. A history of repaid loans goes a long way towards fortifying this portion of the score. Recent credit applications, particularly a lot of them, may suggest that the individual is desperate to borrow more money and may have a financial problem. Similarly, the types of credit demonstrate spending patterns and reliability. A credit report containing all credit cards may be seen as more risky than one with a few credit cards, a repaid auto loan and an ongoing mortgage.
    Source: http://ezinearticles.com/?Credit-Report---...53288

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So in 6 months this will be wiped from my credit report and my score will automatically go back up?

Any "damage" done as a result of the inquiry will be gone after 6 months.

 

You will not recover from losing an old account as quickly, though. That's why I always advise people to keep whatever their oldest accounts are active. If it's a savings account your parents started, keep $500 in it, if it's your first college credit card with a 26% APR, threaten to cancel and they will reduce your rate when they see an older account in good standing...

 

Here's some further information on the subject:

The score is determined by a variety of factors, each of which makes up a portion of the score:

  • Approximately one third of the score represents the individual's payment history. Previous loans, and the ability to pay them are shown in this portion of the score. Both late payments and failure to pay at all affect this portion of the score. Those who have paid all of his or her loans on time will obtain the highest scores.
  • Another third of the score is determined by current debts, and the ratio of debt to the amount of available credit. Keeping all of your credit cards at or near their limits will hurt this portion of the score. This seems obvious; those who are already near their credit limits may have trouble paying back any future loans.
  • The remaining third of the credit score is determined by three factors; length of credit history, recent credit applications, and the types of overall credit in the individual's credit history. The length of the credit history is the most significant item, as lenders are more suspicious of borrowers who have not established a pattern of borrowing and repaying loans. A history of repaid loans goes a long way towards fortifying this portion of the score. Recent credit applications, particularly a lot of them, may suggest that the individual is desperate to borrow more money and may have a financial problem. Similarly, the types of credit demonstrate spending patterns and reliability. A credit report containing all credit cards may be seen as more risky than one with a few credit cards, a repaid auto loan and an ongoing mortgage.
    Source: http://ezinearticles.com/?Credit-Report---...53288

 

 

my oldest credit card i hate.

 

 

i just paid it off after they screwed me. i am going to write them the nastiest of nasty letters, but not request it cancelled. it should be fun.

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my oldest credit card i hate.

Yeah - almost everybody hates their first card. It's usually the one with a freaking 25% interest rate, which is almost like financial rape. If you have had it for a while, you should definately call and tell them you want to cancel. When they switch you to their "cancellation manager," you are now talking to a person who gets paid to KEEP your business. Tell this person how much you hate the card and how terrible the rate is. They will offer balance transfers at 0% or 0% APR for 6 months or lower your interest rate or all of the above. It's worth doing every 3 years or so. You have nothing to lose.

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