Jump to content

Stanton, Morrison on MLB.com's Top 50


B1az3
 Share

Recommended Posts

MIAMI -- When Marlins prospect Mike Stanton digs into the batter's box, people take notice. If you're in the outfield seats, you may also want to take cover.

 

An imposing 6-foot-5 and 240 pounds, the 20-year-old slugger is establishing himself as one of the elite power hitters in the Minor Leagues. His sheer strength makes him a threat to hit the ball out on any pitch.

 

A former three-sport athlete in high school, Stanton combined for 28 home runs at Class A Jupiter and Double-A Jacksonville last season.

 

Stanton's impressive home run totals came after he went deep 39 times at low Class A Greensboro in 2008. Since reaching Greensboro in '08, the young outfielder is averaging a home run every 14.1 at-bats.

 

Posing such a threat, Stanton stands out.

 

For a couple of seasons, Stanton has been regarded as one of the best prospects in the game. His credentials are receiving more validation.

 

According to rankings by MLB.com, which were announced on Wednesday on the MLB Network, Stanton is regarded as the No. 3 prospect in the game.

 

Only Braves slugging outfielder Jason Heyward and Nationals pitching sensation Stephen Strasburg -- rated Nos. 1 and 2, respectively -- are higher than Stanton.

 

The MLB.com Top 50 rankings also includes Marlins first-base prospect Logan Morrison, who is rated No. 25.

 

Teammates at the end of the 2009 season, Stanton and Morrison were major reasons Jacksonville won the Southern League championship.

 

In the playoffs, Morrison batted .360 with four doubles and four RBIs.

 

Next month, Stanton will be in Spring Training with the Marlins, but since he still needs Minor League seasoning, he is expected to open the season in Jacksonville, Fla. The club is in no rush to speed up his development.

 

The Marlins haven't had a prospect as feared as Stanton since Miguel Cabrera broke in as a 20-year-old in 2003.

 

While Cabrera was a more polished overall hitter at a similar age, Stanton has the edge in slugging.

 

The raw power jumps out at you. At Spring Training last year during batting practice, Stanton put on a show. Regularly, he crushed balls that bounced against the Marlins' office building, which is set back behind the left-field wall.

 

Marlins hitting coach Jim Presley, who played for Seattle, remembers watching a 19-year-old Ken Griffey Jr. break in with the Mariners.

 

Last Spring Training, Presley compared Stanton to Griffey.

 

"Ken Griffey was a darn good player, but this kid is right up there with him," Presley said of Stanton at the time. "This kid has got more power than Junior did back then. But I think Junior had him defensively."

 

Before advancing him to the big leagues, the Marlins are looking for Stanton to get a better grasp of high-level Minor League pitching.

 

Stanton played 79 regular-season games with Jacksonville, and he hit .231 with 16 home runs and 53 RBIs.

 

After the 2009 Minor League season ended, Marlins vice president of player development and scouting Jim Fleming said: "The jump from Jupiter to Double-A is a good one. You want to challenge them. You want some tough spots in the Minor Leagues and see them get through it.

 

"It's not something you want them to have to experience for the first time at the big league level. It's part of the process to keep them challenged and push them a little bit."

 

The Marlins selected Stanton in the second round out of Notre Dame High School in California in the 2007 First-Year Player Draft. The same year, Florida picked third baseman Matt Dominguez in the first round.

 

Dominguez is also a top prospect in the Marlins' system, and both are from the Los Angeles area.

 

"Sick power," Dominguez said of Stanton in an interview last year. "[At Greensboro], he was hitting balls harder than I've ever seen in my life -- hitting curveballs, fastballs, changeups. He was hitting everything very hard and very far."

 

Dominguez recalls the first time he saw Stanton play. It was during practice for the Area Code Games at Long Beach State's Blair Field.

 

"He was this big guy, hitting the ball farther than anybody out there," Dominguez said in a 2009 interview. "Blair Field in Long Beach, it's a pretty big field. It wasn't even close. He was hitting them 100 feet past the wall.

 

"I saw that, and I was like, 'Who's this guy?' Yeah, he was pretty impressive."

 

Morrison, meanwhile, is a 22-year-old left-handed hitter who will get a chance to win a starting big league job. The Marlins have noted that they will look at Morrison and prospect Gaby Sanchez at first base when Spring Training begins.

 

Morrison also can play a corner-outfield spot, but the team feels defensively that he is a better-than-average defensive first baseman.

 

A broken bone in his right thumb limited Morrison to 79 games at Double-A last season, and he batted .277 with eight home runs and 47 RBIs. At Jupiter in 2008, he batted .332 and was named the Southern League's MVP.

 

"If I put up the numbers I need to, then hopefully I'll be on that Opening Day roster," Morrison said in a recent video interview with MLB.com. "That's what I've prepared for this whole offseason. "If it doesn't happen, I'm not going to be all depressed. There will be other opportunities."

http://florida.marli...t=.jsp&c_id=fla

 

Video:

-Stanton's video is on the top link.

-Morrison http://florida.marli...649166&c_id=fla

 

All other top 50 prospects: http://florida.marlins.mlb.com/media/video.jsp?topic_id=7962336

Link to comment
Share on other sites


MIAMI -- When Marlins prospect Mike Stanton digs into the batter's box, people take notice. If you're in the outfield seats, you may also want to take cover.

 

An imposing 6-foot-5 and 240 pounds, the 20-year-old slugger is establishing himself as one of the elite power hitters in the Minor Leagues. His sheer strength makes him a threat to hit the ball out on any pitch.

 

A former three-sport athlete in high school, Stanton combined for 28 home runs at Class A Jupiter and Double-A Jacksonville last season.

 

Stanton's impressive home run totals came after he went deep 39 times at low Class A Greensboro in 2008. Since reaching Greensboro in '08, the young outfielder is averaging a home run every 14.1 at-bats.

 

Posing such a threat, Stanton stands out.

 

For a couple of seasons, Stanton has been regarded as one of the best prospects in the game. His credentials are receiving more validation.

 

According to rankings by MLB.com, which were announced on Wednesday on the MLB Network, Stanton is regarded as the No. 3 prospect in the game.

 

Only Braves slugging outfielder Jason Heyward and Nationals pitching sensation Stephen Strasburg -- rated Nos. 1 and 2, respectively -- are higher than Stanton.

 

The MLB.com Top 50 rankings also includes Marlins first-base prospect Logan Morrison, who is rated No. 25.

 

Teammates at the end of the 2009 season, Stanton and Morrison were major reasons Jacksonville won the Southern League championship.

 

In the playoffs, Morrison batted .360 with four doubles and four RBIs.

 

Next month, Stanton will be in Spring Training with the Marlins, but since he still needs Minor League seasoning, he is expected to open the season in Jacksonville, Fla. The club is in no rush to speed up his development.

 

The Marlins haven't had a prospect as feared as Stanton since Miguel Cabrera broke in as a 20-year-old in 2003.

 

While Cabrera was a more polished overall hitter at a similar age, Stanton has the edge in slugging.

 

The raw power jumps out at you. At Spring Training last year during batting practice, Stanton put on a show. Regularly, he crushed balls that bounced against the Marlins' office building, which is set back behind the left-field wall.

 

Marlins hitting coach Jim Presley, who played for Seattle, remembers watching a 19-year-old Ken Griffey Jr. break in with the Mariners.

 

Last Spring Training, Presley compared Stanton to Griffey.

 

"Ken Griffey was a darn good player, but this kid is right up there with him," Presley said of Stanton at the time. "This kid has got more power than Junior did back then. But I think Junior had him defensively."

 

Before advancing him to the big leagues, the Marlins are looking for Stanton to get a better grasp of high-level Minor League pitching.

 

Stanton played 79 regular-season games with Jacksonville, and he hit .231 with 16 home runs and 53 RBIs.

 

After the 2009 Minor League season ended, Marlins vice president of player development and scouting Jim Fleming said: "The jump from Jupiter to Double-A is a good one. You want to challenge them. You want some tough spots in the Minor Leagues and see them get through it.

 

"It's not something you want them to have to experience for the first time at the big league level. It's part of the process to keep them challenged and push them a little bit."

 

The Marlins selected Stanton in the second round out of Notre Dame High School in California in the 2007 First-Year Player Draft. The same year, Florida picked third baseman Matt Dominguez in the first round.

 

Dominguez is also a top prospect in the Marlins' system, and both are from the Los Angeles area.

 

"Sick power," Dominguez said of Stanton in an interview last year. "[At Greensboro], he was hitting balls harder than I've ever seen in my life -- hitting curveballs, fastballs, changeups. He was hitting everything very hard and very far."

 

Dominguez recalls the first time he saw Stanton play. It was during practice for the Area Code Games at Long Beach State's Blair Field.

 

"He was this big guy, hitting the ball farther than anybody out there," Dominguez said in a 2009 interview. "Blair Field in Long Beach, it's a pretty big field. It wasn't even close. He was hitting them 100 feet past the wall.

 

"I saw that, and I was like, 'Who's this guy?' Yeah, he was pretty impressive."

 

Morrison, meanwhile, is a 22-year-old left-handed hitter who will get a chance to win a starting big league job. The Marlins have noted that they will look at Morrison and prospect Gaby Sanchez at first base when Spring Training begins.

 

Morrison also can play a corner-outfield spot, but the team feels defensively that he is a better-than-average defensive first baseman.

 

A broken bone in his right thumb limited Morrison to 79 games at Double-A last season, and he batted .277 with eight home runs and 47 RBIs. At Jupiter in 2008, he batted .332 and was named the Southern League's MVP.

 

"If I put up the numbers I need to, then hopefully I'll be on that Opening Day roster," Morrison said in a recent video interview with MLB.com. "That's what I've prepared for this whole offseason. "If it doesn't happen, I'm not going to be all depressed. There will be other opportunities."

http://florida.marli...t=.jsp&c_id=fla

 

Video:

-Stanton's video is on the top link.

-Morrison http://florida.marli...649166&c_id=fla

 

All other top 50 prospects: http://florida.marli...opic_id=7962336

Didn't Logan have a wrist injury???? I wonder who the hell they are confusing him with in reference to the thumb?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found it interesting the top 3 prospects are all in NL East, (Heyward Atl #1, Strasberg Was #2)this could make things very interesting the next few years with division rivals

 

It all comes down to the pitching when all is said and done.

 

Currently, I'd say the Marlins have the best long term chances with our current 6 young starters, 20 projectable RP arms, an emerging young class in A Ball with James, Hand, Berglund, and Kaminska, and only 2 long term contracts on the books to have cash to fill in the gaps. Johnson is a rock, and as long as Volstad turns into a mid rotation starter, and one of Nolasco/West/Miller meets their projection and gets over their youth (let alone if two of them do it then we're looking amazing), that'll be a rock solid 1-2-3 to add innings eaters too and see how youth works out in the 5. We're in really good shape unless we have something like 2007 again where three guys go down with serious arm injuries that miss a year plus. Unlike everyone else also, we still have Uggla, Cantu, Ross, Nunez, and some spare parts like Paulino and Pinto, still to trade for basically exclusive pitching to add to the lot. I'll take my chances with these guys. We easily have the best hitting situation with Hanley, Maybin, Coghlan, Stanton, Morrison, and Dominguez. Let alone if Skipworth shows up then holy crap.

 

Washington, has a bunch of interesting arms but you'd really put that into the "Strasburg and Zimmerman," and then a bunch of projectable types that may or may not work out. They still need another 2 good drafts, and to get a big free agent, to be really taken seriously for a few years down the road. But if they do that, they certainly have the potential top end pitching to get scary fast.

 

The Mets, are a freaking wreck which is great. They will have to throw money at FA as nothing great is coming up the system.

 

The Phillies, they will be rock solid for a 3 year contending run before Halladay gets older, and their guys start wearing down. At some point, the Marlins will have to beat them in 2-3 years to change the guards of the NL East so to speak.

 

Which leaves the Braves, who had a lot of old guys, but really high potential with Jurrjens, Hansen, Minor, and another two or three down the road. Plus as you say, Heyward should become the centerpiece of a very good young lineup. I would say longterm, I'd be most worried with Atlanta as just like us, they have everything in house unless something bad happens development/injury wise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Lou, ATL is the team I'm most afraid of in the NL East. They are up and coming like us but I still think we have a better projection.

 

 

We're afraid of Atlanta because they are up and coming an they've been fairly mediocre in recent years. But I can't not respect Philadelphia, who for some reason doesn't seem to get genuine respect year after year no matter how successful they've actually been. They're simply the good team that we're used to being good, but the concept of another team that could be just as good is worrisome.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This thread is quite old. Please consider starting a new thread rather than reviving this one.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share



×
×
  • Create New...