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Top 10 things that need to be changed in sports


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This is a list on USA Today, they're releasing a new one each day, i'll post the ones so far:

 

10. Eliminate possession arrow

The scenario has inspired debate for nearly a quarter century. A close college basketball game moves into the final minutes. The team playing defense, behind by a point or two, makes a great defensive play, disrupts the offense, ties up the ball ... and is rewarded by the chance to play more defense. The possession arrow on the scorer's table in college basketball has been the source of discussions since the alternating-possession rule went into effect in 1981.

 

9. Give sudden-death OT the boot

The moniker is as uniquely NFL as it is politically incorrect: Sudden-death overtime. For many fans, though, as well as a handful of decision-makers in the NFL ? including, a couple of years ago, Commissioner Paul Tagliabue ? it's a bit too sudden. That's because, of course, both teams don't necessarily get a chance to score. Correctly call the coin flip, take the ball first and score, game over.

 

8. Cut back on ticket prices

While prices for premium seats continue to rise for the well-heeled, there is a move among concerned sports owners and their marketing gurus to keep prices more affordable and games more accessible in a dynamically readjusting marketplace. That means scaling back some ticket blocks ? unheard of in the 1990s, when across-the-board increases often alienated and shut out die-hard fans.

 

7. Pay college athletes for play

From TV rights to its men's basketball tournament, the NCAA averages better than half a billion dollars a year in revenue. That does not include payouts from the 28 football bowls, which exceed $184 million and go to the conferences. Given those numbers, why aren't athletes in revenue-generating sports such as men's basketball and college football paid?

 

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/ten-things-...hange-index.htm

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I've never understood the problem with the possession arrow...why should the defense get automatically rewarded (like some people suggest)? They made a good play, but they didn't get the steal, and the offensive guy should get some credit for not giving up the rock.

 

And a jumpball gives way too much advantage to height. How fair is it for a 5'11" PG to jump against a 6'10" power forward or center?

 

A held ball is a situation where each team theoretically has 50% of the possession of the ball, so alternating possessions only seems fair.

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College football overtime system blows. It's way too easy to score and the points become ridiculous. Maybe if they each had a chance to score and if both teams fail to score on their initial possessions they then play sudden death.

 

The possession arrow blows also, but it doesn't become a factor that often.

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Why dont they just play an entire overtime period. Doesnt have to be 15 minutes necessarily, but both teams get to play and whenver the time is up the team with the most points win, if there is a tie then it remains that way. In the playoffs if this happens after the tie maybe then they can do somehting like sudden death or college stlye OT

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I've never understood the problem with the possession arrow...why should the defense get automatically rewarded (like some people suggest)? They made a good play, but they didn't get the steal, and the offensive guy should get some credit for not giving up the rock.

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i agree completely.

 

sudden death overtime, on the other hand, is really stupid. i'm not crazy about college football's overtime system, but anything is better than essentially leaving a game up to random chance.

 

imo they should just let em play for another 10-15 minutes.

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I just updated the list with numbers 7 and 8.

 

8. Cut back on ticket prices

While prices for premium seats continue to rise for the well-heeled, there is a move among concerned sports owners and their marketing gurus to keep prices more affordable and games more accessible in a dynamically readjusting marketplace. That means scaling back some ticket blocks ? unheard of in the 1990s, when across-the-board increases often alienated and shut out die-hard fans.

 

7. Pay college athletes for play

From TV rights to its men's basketball tournament, the NCAA averages better than half a billion dollars a year in revenue. That does not include payouts from the 28 football bowls, which exceed $184 million and go to the conferences. Given those numbers, why aren't athletes in revenue-generating sports such as men's basketball and college football paid?

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Thw should not pay student-athletes. Hell, they shouldn't even let students who do not plan on finishing their degrees a chance to play on the team. We should not be subsidizing a player who wants to use the school for the attention of nationally-broadcasted games while he flunks out of school, rapes co-eds, does drugs and waits to get drafted.

 

Look.. I understand how much money these athletic programs make the university. The upward swing the University of Maryland-College Park has largely been because its resurgence in the national colllegiate sports scene. But very few, only 6 the past three years, athletic departments have come in the black.

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as a college athlete who knows what time it takes to be a college athlete, and realizes that the rapists, drug-users, guys who fail out of schools are not the majority. They are a small minority. Hell, they're a small minority in football alone.

 

I think they should get payed. It's a crime to see colleges, advertisers, the NCAA, coaches, etc. making biiggg $ for essentially free labor. Yah, the athletes get scholarships. But so do other students.

 

You can get scholarships for writing a 1 paragraph essay!

 

Football takes up so much time, it's unbelievable. The only students that put in as much time as student-athletes are students with jobs......and they get paid.

 

I was rehashing (during two-a-days...while everyone else was at home sitting on their butt for their last couple weeks of summer) how much time I put in to both school and football compared to what a student puts into school.

 

Regular student: goes to (on average) 3 hrs of class everyday, and puts in about 3 hrs of school work everyday (on average...but the professors have some odd belief that we should put in twice as much work after class as we do in class). Total time: 6 hrs. (usually has afternoons free and studies at night, or vice versa...except for studying for tests or writing papers obviously).

 

Student athlete: goes to 3 hrs of class, has 3 hrs of school work. Has 1 hr of weightlifting everyday (well, 4 days a week), 1 hour of position meetings every day, 2.5 hrs of practice everyday. Spends all of Saturday focused on game day, while other students (scholarships and non-scholarship students) are drinking all day. Also, during the week, add another half hour for personal meetings with a coach, putting pads on before practice, showering after practice, etc. Also, one can include another half hour to 1.5 hrs for training room time...ranging from getting ankles taped, to going in everyday for rehab.

 

Students need some money for the work they put in. It's a wonder more athletes don't get burnt out and do stupid things like the small minority puts in.

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I agree with Furman here, I'm not an athlete, but Universities are making as incredible amount of money off of these people. They deserve something. I'm not saying big bucks or anything but something. It is like another job plus the school work.

 

For one of my classes a few athletes and myself are trying to get an NCAA guy from the Southern Conference to come and debate us on this issue.

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Sorry, Furman, I did not mean to imply that the majority, or even a substantial amount, of student-athletes were committing these heinous crimes. I was pointing that these incidents are largely committed by big-time athletes who have their sights are the professional ranks, and have little interest in getting an education and sharing an once in a lifetime experience at college.

 

Fact is few Division 1 schools schools actually make a profit (40 with D-IA football, 9 D-IAA, 6 D-IAAA, aka no football, out of 320+ DI schools) after taking into account contracts for coaches, facilities, travel, scholarships, recruiting, extra perssonel and the necessary costs of sustaining the 16 varsity programs each D1 is required to have. Very few can sustain that kind of success (6 athletic departments have made a profit the past three years). It's just not feasible for student-athletes to be paid.

 

I really doubt that the colleges are pushing for their student-athletes to spend more and more of their time on the playing court/field. Just like the quest for bigger and better facilities, it's the coaches, who are trying to gain the edge on their opponents and move up the ranks.

 

Anyways, most students on scholarship are asked to work harder.

My sister had to work 30 hours each week for the college as an undergrad, and now as a graduate student. My cousin had to sign a legally-binding document that upon taking a scholarship for her education degree that she was going to spend 5 years as a teacher in the state, 3 in the inner-city.

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1) Yes, colleges athletics are demanding more and more time for student-athletes.

2) Many students may put in a lot of work...but most scholarships require a 3.0 GPA (at most....sometimes a 2.0 suffices). So, more work is not necessarily needed. Which brings up this point:

 

a student on academic scholarship MAY or MAY NOT need to put in a significantly larger amount of time into studies compared to an average non-scholarship student.

 

but...

 

a student on athletic scholarship (not even mentioning walk-ons!) is guaranteed to put in at least twice as much time in than a regular student.

 

 

And as for paying...colleges don't necessarily have to pay. Maybe the NCAA needs to. Maybe booster PROGRAMS (not individual boosters) need to.

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see, in America...money runs most things...including college athletics.

 

And it will be tough to limit practice time....why would a coach decide to limit practice time, hurt his chances of winning the next game, and eventually hurt his job security?

 

It's an endless cycle. Paying the athletes is not some evil idea...it makes sense.

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