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Clinton to give speech at UN climiate conference


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http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/americas/12/...n.ap/index.html

 

Clinton 'annoys' U.S. climate team

 

Ex-president to make surprise speech at U.N. conference

 

 

MONTREAL, Quebec (AP) -- A contentious U.N. climate conference entered its final day Friday with the long-term future undecided in the fight against global warming, and with a surprise visitor on tap to rally the "pro-Kyoto" forces.

 

Bill Clinton, who as president championed the Kyoto Protocol clamping controls on "greenhouse gases," was scheduled to speak at the conference Friday afternoon -- in an unofficial capacity but potentially at a critical point in backroom talks involving the U.S. delegation.

 

The U.S. envoys, representing a Bush administration that renounced the Kyoto pact, were said to be displeased by the 11th-hour surprise.

 

"They haven't protested formally, but they're annoyed," a source in the Canadian government, conference host, said of the U.S. delegates. "They're not infuriated, but they're not thrilled."

 

This source spoke on condition of anonymity because as a civil servant -- not a politician -- he is barred from the public light during Canada's current election season.

 

The U.S. delegation was meeting late Thursday and had no immediate public comment, said spokeswoman Susan Povenmire.

 

Clinton, who was invited here by the City of Montreal, will speak in the main conference hall between the official morning and afternoon plenary sessions, said U.N. conference spokesman John Hay.

 

Despite its unofficial nature, the speech was sure to attract hundreds of delegates from the more than 180 countries represented.

 

A city spokesman said the ex-president will be representing the William J. Clinton Foundation, which operates the Clinton Global Initiative, a program focusing on climate change as a business opportunity.

 

Clinton's vice president, Al Gore, was instrumental in final negotiations on the 1997 treaty protocol initialed in the Japanese city of Kyoto. It mandates cutbacks in 35 industrialized nations of emissions of carbon dioxide and five other gases by 2012.

 

A broad scientific consensus agrees that these gases accumulating in the atmosphere, byproducts of automobile engines, power plants and other fossil fuel-burning industries, contributed significantly to the past century's global temperature rise of 1 degree Fahrenheit. Continued warming is expected to disrupt the global climate.

 

In the late 1990s the U.S. Senate balked at ratifying Kyoto, and the incoming President Bush in 2001 formally renounced the accord, saying it would harm the U.S. economy.

 

The Montreal meeting, attended by almost 10,000 delegates, environmentalists, business representatives and others, was the first annual U.N. climate conference since Kyoto took effect in February.

 

The protocol's language requires its member nations to begin talks now on emissions controls after 2012, when the Kyoto regime expires. Those governments appeared near agreement Thursday on a process for completing such talks by 2008.

 

But the Canadians and others also saw Montreal as an opportunity to draw the outsider United States into the emission-controls regime, through discussions under the broader 1992 U.N. climate treaty.

 

The Americans earlier this week rejected the idea of rejoining future negotiations to set post-2012 emissions controls.

 

But the Canadians continued to press for agreement Thursday, presenting the U.S. delegation with vague language by which Washington would join only in "exploring" "approaches" to cooperative action. The Canadians hoped the wording was sufficiently noncommittal to gain U.S. approval.

 

The Bush administration says it prefers to deal with climate issues on a bilateral or regional basis, not through global negotiations, and favors voluntary approaches.

 

As a demonstration of U.S. efforts to combat climate change, it points to $3 billion a year in U.S. government spending on research and development of energy-saving technologies.

 

 

 

This may be quite interesting.

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Guest Moneyball

I imagine Clinton will be accused of being "against the troops" and unpatriotic now for questioning Bush's environmental policy.

 

 

Apples and oranges. :rolleyes:

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Guest Moneyball

I imagine Clinton will be accused of being "against the troops" and unpatriotic now for questioning Bush's environmental policy.

 

 

Apples and oranges. :rolleyes:

 

how so?

 

anyone who is a critic of the Bush administration automatically gets lumped into the unpatriotic crew.

 

Anyone who is a critic of the Iraq war gets lumped into the unpatriotic crew. :rolleyes:

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I imagine Clinton will be accused of being "against the troops" and unpatriotic now for questioning Bush's environmental policy.

 

 

Apples and oranges. :rolleyes:

 

how so?

 

anyone who is a critic of the Bush administration automatically gets lumped into the unpatriotic crew.

 

Anyone who is a critic of the Iraq war gets lumped into the unpatriotic crew. :rolleyes:

 

i'm also wholly against the Patriot Act, does that make me unpatriotic?

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Guest Moneyball

I imagine Clinton will be accused of being "against the troops" and unpatriotic now for questioning Bush's environmental policy.

 

 

Apples and oranges. :rolleyes:

 

how so?

 

anyone who is a critic of the Bush administration automatically gets lumped into the unpatriotic crew.

 

Anyone who is a critic of the Iraq war gets lumped into the unpatriotic crew. :rolleyes:

 

i'm also wholly against the Patriot Act, does that make me unpatriotic?

 

No, ofcourse not.

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And here is what Clinton said today:

 

Clinton: Bush 'flat wrong' on climate

 

MONTREAL, Quebec (AP) -- Former U.S. President Bill Clinton told a global audience of diplomats, environmentalists and others on Friday that the Bush administration is "flat wrong" in claiming that reducing greenhouse-gas emissions to fight global warming would damage the U.S. economy.

 

With a "serious disciplined effort" to develop energy-saving technology, he said, "we could meet and surpass the Kyoto targets in a way that would strengthen and not weaken our economies."

 

Clinton, a champion of the Kyoto Protocol, the existing emissions-controls agreement opposed by the Bush administration, spoke in the final hours of a two-week U.N. climate conference at which Washington has come under heavy criticism for its stand.

 

Most delegations appeared ready Friday to leave an unwilling United States behind and open a new round of negotiations on future cutbacks in the emissions blamed for global warming.

 

"There's no longer any serious doubt that climate change is real, acclerating and caused by human activities," said Clinton, whose address was interrupted repeatedly by enthusiastic applause.

 

"We are uncertain about how deep and the time of arrival of the consequences, but we are quite clear they will not be good."

 

Canadian officials said the U.S. delegation was displeased with the last-minute scheduling of the Clinton speech.

 

But U.S. delegation chief Paula Dobriansky issued a statement saying events like Clinton's appearance "are useful opportunities to hear a wide range of views on global climate change."

 

The former U.S. chief executive spoke between the official morning and afternoon plenary sessions of the conference, representing the William J. Clinton Foundation, which includes a climate-change program in its activities.

 

In the real work of the conference, delegates from more than 180 countries bargained behind closed doors until 6:30 a.m. Friday, making final adjustments to an agreement to negotiate additional reductions in carbon dioxide and other gases after 2012, when the Kyoto accord expires.

 

Efforts by host-country Canada and others to draw the United States into the process were failing. The Bush administration says it favors a voluntary approach, not global negotiations, to deal with climate issues.

 

"It's such a pity the United States is still very much unwilling to join the international community, to have a multilateral effort to deal with climate change," said Kenya's Emily Ojoo Massawa, chair of the African group of nations at the conference.

 

Clinton's vice president, Al Gore, was instrumental in final negotiations on the 1997 treaty protocol that was initialed in the Japanese city of Kyoto and mandates cutbacks in 35 industrialized nations of emissions of carbon dioxide and five other gases by 2012.

 

A broad scientific consensus agrees that these gases accumulating in the atmosphere, byproducts of automobile engines, power plants and other fossil fuel-burning industries, contributed significantly to the past century's global temperature rise of 1 degree Fahrenheit (0.7 degree Celsius). Continued warming is expected to disrupt the global climate.

 

In the late 1990s the U.S. Senate balked at ratifying Kyoto, and the incoming President Bush in 2001 formally renounced the accord, saying it would harm the U.S. economy.

 

The Montreal meeting, attended by almost 10,000 delegates, environmentalists, business representatives and others, was the first annual U.N. climate conference since Kyoto took effect last February.

 

The protocol's language requires its member nations to begin talks now on emissions controls after 2012, when the Kyoto regime expires.

 

The Canadians and others also saw Montreal as an opportunity to draw the outsider United States into the emission-controls regime, through discussions under the broader 1992 U.N. climate treaty.

 

But the Americans have repeatedly rejected the idea of rejoining future negotiations to set post-2012 emissions controls.

 

The Canadians continued to press for agreement early Friday, offering the U.S. delegation vague, noncommittal language by which Washington would join only in "exploring" "approaches" to cooperative action.

 

While rejecting mandatory targets, the Bush administration points to the U.S. government's spending of $3 billion a year on research and development of energy-saving technologies as a demonstration of U.S. efforts to combat climate change.

 

 

 

 

Thoughts?

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A broad scientific consensus agrees that these gases accumulating in the atmosphere, byproducts of automobile engines, power plants and other fossil fuel-burning industries, contributed significantly to the past century's global temperature rise of 1 degree Fahrenheit (0.7 degree Celsius). Continued warming is expected to disrupt the global climate.

 

 

 

Its essentially boiled down to an effort to convince people that the scientific consensus has it wrong, that these scientists have an agenda, and that the auto industry is wiser on this issue. It's a shame. Good to see that other countries will move forward. Hopefully executive change can move us along.

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I do think that a lot of the anti-Global Warming people in the press are either working for or being influenced by the auto and fuel industries.

 

There is no reason for scientists to have an agenda, they're the ones that are supposed to have the facts in the first place, not some politicians.

 

 

That's not necessarily true, depending on where their grants are from

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Guest Moneyball

I do think that a lot of the anti-Global Warming people in the press are either working for or being influenced by the auto and fuel industries.

 

There is no reason for scientists to have an agenda, they're the ones that are supposed to have the facts in the first place, not some politicians.

 

 

:lol :lol :lol

 

Everyone has an agenda...

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