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Seats Currently Going in Question


h2r09
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Why does there seem to be so much space between the seats every 2 rows? is that just how the seats are going to be or will the put in another row there later? If that is how it will stay that is phenomenal because i need some damn room in between seats.

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Why does there seem to be so much space between the seats every 2 rows? is that just how the seats are going to be or will the put in another row there later? If that is how it will stay that is phenomenal because i need some damn room in between seats.

 

 

Any pictures?

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Yes I would think there will be another row going in the big gaps you see. One reason I could think of them doing it this way is perhaps to allow more room for workers and supplies to be moved around in the lower areas as necessary? I dunno, just a thought.

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If you look at Sections 15 directly behind home plate you can see that 16 of the 20 rows below the blue tiles have seat brackets and only 4 rows (3, 6, 8 and 10) are unpopulated. There will be 6 more rows above the blue tiles. All sections from 11 to 18 behind home plate will have 26 rows.

 

So, yes, all of the "empty" rows everywhere will have seats.

 

It's probably true that skipping every 3rd or so row was to make it easier for workers, but it's obvious that the easiest way to have an unobstructed work-space is just to start at the top and work down row-by-row without skipping any rows.

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If you look at Sections 15 directly behind home plate you can see that 16 of the 20 rows below the blue tiles have seat brackets and only 4 rows (3, 6, 8 and 10) are unpopulated. There will be 6 more rows above the blue tiles. All sections from 11 to 18 behind home plate will have 26 rows.

 

So, yes, all of the "empty" rows everywhere will have seats.

 

It's probably true that skipping every 3rd or so row was to make it easier for workers, [/b]but it's obvious that the easiest way to have an unobstructed work-space is just to start at the top and work down row-by-row without skipping any rows.

 

 

Makes it a little cramped to get the back bolts in, I would think. I would guess this way the workers can also get around the place easier carrying other supplies. There are all kinds of other things going on at the same time. I really have no idea, just seems logical.

 

I really never question the construction process. I figure they know what they are doing from past experiences. And as long as it's done on time.........

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Back bolts? What the hell are those?

 

We're talking about the seat mounting brackets, which as far as I can tell are mounted to the vertical concrete face of the row-riser. Maybe there are also bolts that need to driven straight down into horizontal concrete at the top corner of the riser for that row, but I doubt it. The photos of Loria, for instance, show him driving a bolt horizontally into the vertical riser face. I guess that's a "front bolt" from the installer's perspective.

 

Jones's Cowboys stadium seats are all clipped onto a rail which is mounted to each vertical row-riser face. I don't know if they did them from the top down, but my point remains.

 

Clearly, we need one of the construction guys who are actually doing the install to comment because we're just speculating.

 

Speaking of which, the only other purely speculative reason I can come up with is that they assigned more crews than they had sections to be done, so there were multiple crews in each section being installed, hence the gaps as different crews started at different points within each section.

 

Not that any of this matters, all of the rows will have seats; the gaps will all be populated.

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Here's a sort of trivia thing.

 

Jerry Jones runs his Cowboys joint like an airline. Because of the rail-seat system, for big events (Super Bowl, for instance) he can take out regular seats and put in slightly narrower seats, increasing total capacity. It may be only 10%, but it's a big number on the bottom line. So, somewhere he has a big pile of alternate seats.

 

We have a fixed seating scheme, every seat is what it is and won't vary by event. I hope that Loria, et al heard about Jones's seating system and rejected it, as opposed to being unaware of it. Might have been a good revenue enhancer in a World Series.

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Back bolts? What the hell are those?

We're talking about the seat mounting brackets, which as far as I can tell are mounted to the vertical concrete face of the row-riser. Maybe there are also bolts that need to driven straight down into horizontal concrete at the top corner of the riser for that row, but I doubt it. The photos of Loria, for instance, show him driving a bolt horizontally into the vertical riser face. I guess that's a "front bolt" from the installer's perspective.

 

Jones's Cowboys stadium seats are all clipped onto a rail which is mounted to each vertical row-riser face. I don't know if they did them from the top down, but my point remains.

 

Clearly, we need one of the construction guys who are actually doing the install to comment because we're just speculating.

 

Speaking of which, the only other purely speculative reason I can come up with is that they assigned more crews than they had sections to be done, so there were multiple crews in each section being installed, hence the gaps as different crews started at different points within each section.

 

Not that any of this matters, all of the rows will have seats; the gaps will all be populated.

 

 

I would think there are bolts in the front on the bottom and in the back on the bottom. "Back bolts." So starting at the top and working down would mean squeezing in between the seats to tighten them down? But I've never looked at the pictures so I have no idea. Maybe they can get all the bolts from the front. Actually, just thinking about it, they probably can with the bottom part of the seat flipping up. So scratch that thought.

 

But installing from top to bottom would mean carrying seats down past seats that are already installed. Damage control. With 35K to install there will be enough breakage without tempting fate. That's clearly the reason for that. Skipping rows is the real question. Must be a good reason for that.

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With 35K to install there will be enough breakage without tempting fate.

 

I doubt that there will be a single broken seat due to handling by the install crews or anyone else. These things are tough beyond belief. I watched the nerdy architect on "Build it Bigger" on the Science channel take a large (maybe 20 pound) sledge hammer to a Cowboy's seat and it took him 4 full swings to break the thing. That was after a 200 pound guy was standing on and jumping up and down on that seat trying to break it, without success.

 

I also doubt that they schlep them into the stadium and up to the concourses and then down to the install-point, even though it would possible to do considering that there are aisles. Much more likely that they drive the truck in through the left field access, across the field to the section and use one of the many small cranes on the site to do a quick lift to the section. Much less labor and time involved.

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With 35K to install there will be enough breakage without tempting fate.

 

I doubt that there will be a single broken seat due to handling by the install crews or anyone else. These things are tough beyond belief. I watched the nerdy architect on "Build it Bigger" on the Science channel take a large (maybe 20 pound) sledge hammer to a Cowboy's seat and it took him 4 full swings to break the thing. That was after a 200 pound guy was standing on and jumping up and down on that seat trying to break it, without success.

 

I also doubt that they schlep them into the stadium and up to the concourses and then down to the install-point, even though it would possible to do considering that there are aisles. Much more likely that they drive the truck in through the left field access, across the field to the section and use one of the many small cranes on the site to do a quick lift to the section. Much less labor and time involved.

 

That's a thought, and pretty plausibe. I'm still thinking they "truck" them to the concourse and then carry them down to install. That's what laborers do, supply the mechanics (and keep the work areas clean). Plus, I'm not strictly speaking breakage. Deep scratches, scuff marks, etc... would mean that seat would have to be changed to meet the final inspections of that section. At least that's an assumption. Be nice if someone that has an in on the installations would post.

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Here's a sort of trivia thing.

 

Jerry Jones runs his Cowboys joint like an airline. Because of the rail-seat system, for big events (Super Bowl, for instance) he can take out regular seats and put in slightly narrower seats, increasing total capacity. It may be only 10%, but it's a big number on the bottom line. So, somewhere he has a big pile of alternate seats.

 

We have a fixed seating scheme, every seat is what it is and won't vary by event. I hope that Loria, et al heard about Jones's seating system and rejected it, as opposed to being unaware of it. Might have been a good revenue enhancer in a World Series.

 

 

It could be a thing where it just may not make sense for the venue ..... out here in AZ the cardinals stadium can add a lot of extra seats for events, but I'm pretty sure they are not allowed to add them for the playoffs - however, knowing that they have the fiesta bowl, the BCS championship game on rotation, the odd super bowl, mega concerts, ncaa basketball events, etc it's worth having the option

 

even if the marlins were allowed to up capacity for playoffs/WS maybe there isn't enough certain frequency of events that would demand extra seats to make it cost appropriate .... aside from up front costs you have storage costs, labor, maintenance, opportunity costs, etc

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Hopefully we get some insider information from the season ticket holders about the methods used to install the seats.

 

 

Maybe. I wouldn't know. I dropped our season tickets, moved to about 20 miles of the stadium, won't go to many games, and plan to throw a tantrum every time anyone mentions our attendance numbers. Hypocrisy is the way to go, and I want to be as cool as you and your little friends.

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