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Get to know some potential draftees for the Marlins


TSwift25
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So, for those who don't know, the Marlins possess the 12th pick in the draft tomorrow, and it will be the 1st televised draft in MLB history.

 

There are some new draft rules instituted to try to curtail signing bonuses. The first is that teams will receive a compensation pick in next year's draft if they are unable to sign their player. So if the Marlins cannot sign their player at 12, they receive the pick after the 12th selection next year. The other new rule is that the signing deadline is no longer the 1st day of classes for the draftee, but rather the 15th of August. No ink on a contract by then, and the player reenters next year's draft.

 

Now that those fun intricacies are out of the way, here are the guys that are rumored to be linked with the Marlins, could fall to the Marlins because of bonus demands, or who fill a need.

 

All scouting reports are credit of baseball-america

 

First, the favorite to go to the Marlins:

 

Jarrod Parker, rhp

School: Norwell (Ind.) HS. Class: Sr.

B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-2. Wt.: 175. Birthdate: 11/24/88.

Scouting Report: Parker pitched for Team USA's junior national squad that won a silver medal in the World Junior Championship in Cuba last September. He has blown away scouts and hitters all spring, warming up for his initial start at 93-94 mph and hitting 97 with his first official pitch of the season. He touched 98 in that game and has continued to do so since, often working at 95-96. Just 6-foot-2 and 175 pounds, Parker generates his exceptional velocity with an unbelievably quick arm. One scouting director says he has the best arm action of any high school pitcher in the draft, and he has drawn comparisons to a righthanded version of Scott Kazmir and to Tim Lincecum. Parker doesn't have Lincecum's untouchable curveball, but he does have a power curve with good depth and has shown a mid-80s slider. He hasn't needed it much against inferior high school competition, but Parker also has flashed an average to plus changeup. He didn't allow a run until his sixth start or an earned run until his seventh. A Georgia Tech recruit, he should go in the first half of the first round, perhaps to the Braves at No. 14.

W L ERA G SV IP H BB SO

7 0 0.20 7 0 34 10 6 68

 

Some dark-horses:

 

Beau Mills, 3b/1b

School: Lewis-Clark State (Idaho). Class: Jr.

B-T: L-R. Ht.: 6-3. Wt.: 205. Birthdate: 8/15/86.

Scouting Report: Scouts are trained to focus on the process--the how--rather than the results. In Mills' case, though, the results must be mentioned. After two years at Fresno State when he hit 36 home runs, Mills transferred to NAIA Lewis-Clark State. Fresno State suspended him due to academic shortcomings in 2006, and Mills decided to join LCSC after playing for coach Ed Cheff in the summer in the Alaska League. He led the league in home runs (seven) and RBIs (33). The son of ex-big leaguer Brad Mills--now the Red Sox' bench coach--has proceeded to dominate inferior competition. He hit his school-record 31st home run in LCSC's 54th game, and his on-base plus slugging percentage was approaching 1.600. Mills generates well-above-average power thanks to a leveraged, balanced swing and excellent strength; the ball jumps off his bat to all fields. Defense is another matter. A shoulder injury limited him to DH last summer, and Mills' arm is still a bit tight (leading to more DH appearances) and grades as below-average. He works hard at his defense, and his hands and footwork could make him a fringe-average third baseman eventually, though most scouts believe he'll be below-average. His bat should play at first base, but it would play even better at third. In a year with few impact college bats, Mills stands out and figures to go high, no matter which infield corner he plays.

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB

.462 212 87 98 21 0 31 106 4

 

Blake Beavan, rhp

School: Irving (Texas) HS. Class: Sr.

B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-7. Wt.: 210. Birthdate: 1/17/89.

Scouting Report: Beavan set the tone for a dominant senior season last summer, when he threw an 11-strikeout shutout against Cuba--in Cuba--during the quarterfinals of the World Junior Championship. The ace of Team USA and Baseball America's 2006 Youth Player of the Year, Beavan allowed two earned runs in 11 starts this spring, including an 18-whiff perfect game and a 15-strikeout one-hitter in the playoffs. He has pitched at 91-96 mph with his fastball all spring, and some scouts believe his hard slider may be his best pitch. His 6-foot-7, 210-pound frame adds to his intimidating presence, and it's tough for righthanders to dig in when he drops down to a lower three-quarters arm angle. Beavan's mechanics are the only thing that give scouts pause about him. He has some recoil and effort in his arm action, and he often stays too upright and doesn't finish over his front side. He also tips his pitches at times by varying his arm slot. Despite those concerns, Beavan has been durable and should go in the middle of the first round. He committed to Oklahoma but won't be a tough sign.

W L ERA G SV IP H BB SO

9 2 0.19 11 0 73 23 4 139

 

Phillippe Aumont, rhp

School: Ecole Du Versant, Gatineau, Quebec. Class: Sr.

B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-7. Wt.: 225. Birthdate: 1/7/89.

Scouting Report: Canada's national baseball program is well organized, and it is beginning to bear more fruit. The physically imposing Aumont--6-foot-7 and 225 pounds--is the country's best prospect since Adam Loewen. Aumont made a name for himself when he appeared in a high school all-star game in Cape Cod and the East Coast Showcase last summer. He made an impressive showing against the Tigers' extended spring training squad in April, touching 96 mph from a low three-quarters arm slot that can be devastating for righthanded hitters. Aumont flashes an occasionally plus slider at 80-82, though his arm slot makes it difficult for him to stay on top of the pitch. His velocity has vacillated during the spring, and his mechanics are raw, but he's athletic and has pitched well in front of a handful of scouting directors and should be drafted among the top 20 picks. Aumont now lives with guardians, and while he is reluctant to discuss his parents or his past with the media, he has been forthcoming with teams that are interested in him as a potential first-rounder.

W L ERA G SV IP H BB SO

0 0 0.00 0 0 0 0 0 0

No spring season

 

Julio Borbon, of

School: Tennessee. Class: Jr.

B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-1. Wt.: 190. Birthdate: 2/20/86.

Scouting Report: The top college outfielder in a draft virtually devoid of them, Borbon broke his ankle during an intrasquad game a week before the spring season started. He made it back to the Tennessee lineup by the end of March, but he had just two home runs and seven doubles in 143 at-bats. He had not shown the consistent hard contact that made him Team USA's catalyst last summer, when the college national team brought home a gold medal from the World University Championship in Cuba. At his best, Borbon is a top-of-the-order hitter who makes sharp contact and changes games with his plus speed. He's more than a slap-and-run type, with above-average bat speed and some sock in his bat. A Dominican native, he has an aggressive approach and doesn't walk often. His defense is adequate, but he could improve his reads and routes. A popular comparison for Borbon is Johnny Damon, for the pop in his bat as well as his speed and well-below-average arm. He was expected to be taken in the first round despite a lackluster junior year.

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB

.322 143 28 46 6 4 2 23 7

 

Nick Schmidt, lhp

School: Arkansas. Class: Jr.

B-T: L-L. Ht.: 6-5. Wt.: 230. Birthdate: 10/10/85.

Scouting Report: Schmidt was a second-team Preseason All-American, but he has since bypassed such pitchers as Jake Arrieta and Wes Roemer who rated ahead of him. He doesn't have wow stuff, but he's a big, durable lefthander who has been a No. 1 starter in the rugged Southeastern Conference since he was a freshman. His stock took a mild hit last summer, when his stuff was down a notch with Team USA. That was mostly the result of being tired after working 117 innings as a sophomore at Arkansas, but it didn't stop Schmidt from winning the championship game at the World University Games in Cuba--a tribute to his competitive nature. He was a workhorse again this spring, exceeding 100 innings before the end of the regular season. Schmidt pitches off an 88-92 mph fastball and backs it up with a solid changeup and curveball. While he doesn't have a swing-and-miss pitch, he does a fine job of using his 6-foot-5, 230-pound frame to drive his pitches down in the strike zone. He won't be a No. 1 starter but should become a good No. 3 for the club that gets him toward the end of the first round.

W L ERA G SV IP H BB SO

9 2 2.95 15 0 101 74 43 97

 

And 3 who could fall to us because of signing demands

 

Matt Wieters, c

School: Georgia Tech. Class: Jr.

B-T: B-R. Ht.: 6-5. Wt.: 230. Birthdate: 5/21/86.

Scouting Report: Like Price, Wieters' strong college commitment was the only reason he wasn't drafted in the first two rounds in 2004. A talented two-way player who flashed 90 mph heat and plus-plus raw power at his suburban Charleston, S.C., high school, Wieters is well on his way to fulfilling the lofty projections on his bat. He's batted in the heart of Georgia Tech's batting order and served as the closer since arriving on campus. He ranked as the No. 3 prospect in the Cape Cod League in 2006 and was a first-team Preseason All-American this year. While his size has been used as a knock on his defensive ability, one national crosschecker said Wieters was the best defensive catcher he'd seen as an amateur since Charles Johnson, and another said only Joe Mauer was better among the amateurs he'd scouted. Wieters has soft hands, good footwork and well-above-average arm strength, as evidenced by the 96 mph heat he has shown from the mound. Despite his size, he shows an ability to handle low strikes and receives quietly. He's not as vocal on the field as prototypical catchers. Wieters is the most polished hitter in the draft class. He commands the strike zone, displaying patience and pitch recognition. When he gets his pitch, he can use his plus bat speed to pull it out of the park, or keep his hands inside it and line it to the opposite field. A natural righthanded hitter, his swing is shorter from the right and he tends to work up the middle more as a righthanded hitter. He prefers to pull and has more power from the left. He could post averages near .280 with 30-homer potential in the big leagues. If the Devil Rays take Price No. 1, the Royals could take Wieters second, but he could slide out of the top 10 if the money adviser Scott Boras reportedly will seek is perceived as exorbitant.

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB

.376 194 42 73 17 2 10 56 1

 

Rick Porcello, rhp

School: Seton Hall Prep, West Orange, N.J. Class: Sr.

B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-5. Wt.: 188. Birthdate: 12/27/88.

Scouting Report: The top pitcher in the long awaited, much anticipated high school Class of 2007, Porcello was tabbed as a can't-miss prospect by the time he was a 15-year-old on the showcase circuit. His maternal grandfather, Sam Dente, played shortstop in the majors, appearing in the 1954 World Series with the Indians. Porcello has shown steady improvement during his prep career, and was pitching at his best heading down the stretch, tossing a seven-inning perfect game for the nation's No. 1 high school team in May. He's long, lean, athletic and projectable with a clean delivery. His fastball sits at 93-95, touching 98. He holds his velocity deep into outings. He throws a tight curveball at 74-76 and a harder, sharp-breaking slider at 80-82. He shows feel for his changeup. He can spot his fastball to both sides of the plate, and mixes his pitches effectively. He tends to finish his delivery across his body, and if he improved his extension, his stuff could have better life, which would make him profile as a true top-of-the-rotation pitcher. He still is likely to be the first high school pitcher selected.

W L ERA G SV IP H BB SO

6 0 0.33 9 1 43 23 7 81

 

Andrew Brackman, rhp

School: North Carolina State. Class: Jr.

B-T: R-R. Ht.: 6-10. Wt.: 240. Birthdate: 12/4/85.

Scouting Report: As an awkward 6-foot-7 16-year-old at Cincinnati's Moeller High, Brackman wasn't considered a top 50 prospect in baseball or basketball. His basketball game blossomed as a senior, and when N.C. State offered him a chance to play both sports, he eagerly accepted. A bout with tendinitis assured he wouldn't be drafted highly enough out of high school to buy him out of college, and after giving up basketball as a sophomore (he had thrown just 77 innings in his first two years at N.C. State), he's begun to come into this own. Now a legitimate 6-foot-10, 240 pounds, his upside is considerable. His athleticism helps him repeat his delivery, but he struggles with his balance and release point, leading to erratic command, especially of his secondary stuff. He touched 99 mph in the Cape Cod League in 2006 and again during an early-season outing in Myrtle Beach, S.C., and he pitches at 94 with exceptional plane. His mid-80s spike-curveball is filthy. Brackman's changeup was the pitch that had improved the most this spring, and grades as a third potential plus offering. He's still unrefined, but even without the polish, Brackman shouldn't slide out of the top 10 picks.

W L ERA G SV IP H BB SO

6 4 3.81 13 0 78 78 37 74

 

My thoughts:

 

We'll probably end up taking a pitcher. It's a shame that we did what we did in 2005, because if there was ever a year to load up on high-school pitching, this truly is the year. The two players who fit us the best, Wieters and Borbon are both college players, meaning they could move fast, but Wieters may not fall to 12, and Borbon is probably a reach at 12, but won't make it to our second pick.

 

Porcello is, to me, probably the best pitcher in the draft but his super high signing demands coupled with him being only a high-schooler have made it rumored he could fall all the way to the Dodgers at 20, or even the Yankees at 30. Still, the Marlins love high-school arms, and under Loria, they haven't shied away from taking mega upside guys with big bonus demands (Allison).

 

I think we probably end up taking Parker, and if we do with Wieters on the board, I'll probably have to be hospitalized.

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Is Brackman seriously rated that highly still?

 

His velocity is way down and he is injured for NC State's regional. I wouldn't want my team taking a 1st rounder on a guy who isn't all in one piece.

 

Nah, he wants big money and pitched only like 5 innings in May.

 

He's a virtual lock to the Yankees at 30.

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Is Brackman seriously rated that highly still?

 

His velocity is way down and he is injured for NC State's regional. I wouldn't want my team taking a 1st rounder on a guy who isn't all in one piece.

 

Nah, he wants big money and pitched only like 5 innings in May.

 

He's a virtual lock to the Yankees at 30.

Interesting, thanks.

 

I had no idea about his stock and was just surprised to see him still that highly thought of to be 1st round material.

 

I saw him in person this year and he has put on a bunch of weight and he looked like sh*t compared to when I saw him in person his freshman and sophomore years.

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For everybody in the Wieters camp, my understanding is that if the top 3 shakes down as expected (Price to Tampa, Porcello to the Royals, Vitters to the Cubs) the only road block for Wieters to fall to 12 or lower is Milwaukee at 7. They had like half their front office go for an inperson scouting, so it's just his monetary demands at that point. The prevailing thought is that Boras wants a Teixeira deal for him ($8 mil and a big league contract), and that's a lot to scare off clubs.

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I have a feeling we really like SS Justin Jackson from North Carolina and he will be the pick. A reach right now, yes, but a would have been considered value pick at #12 just 2-3 months ago.

 

Personally, I want Parker or Heyward, but don't think either will fall. I will be really pissed if we take any college pitcher not named Moskos or Detwiller. All the HS arms are pretty exciting, and won't be upset with any of them.

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I have a feeling we really like SS Justin Jackson from North Carolina and he will be the pick. A reach right now, yes, but a would have been considered value pick at #12 just 2-3 months ago.

 

Personally, I want Parker or Heyward, but don't think either will fall. I will be really pissed if we take any college pitcher not named Moskos or Detwiller. All the HS arms are pretty exciting, and won't be upset with any of them.

 

If we're going to take a reach player, give me Borbon.

 

Jackson seems too reminiscient of Robert Andino for me.

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I have a feeling we really like SS Justin Jackson from North Carolina and he will be the pick. A reach right now, yes, but a would have been considered value pick at #12 just 2-3 months ago.

 

Personally, I want Parker or Heyward, but don't think either will fall. I will be really pissed if we take any college pitcher not named Moskos or Detwiller. All the HS arms are pretty exciting, and won't be upset with any of them.

 

If we're going to take a reach player, give me Borbon.

 

Jackson seems too reminiscient of Robert Andino for me.

I agree I have no idea about any of these kids but everthing I have read about Jackson sounds "Meh" I have seen some videos he does have a pretty nice swing but that doesnt translate to success in a professional baseball career. I like Blake Beavan and Matt Dominguez prospects

 

BTW many mock draft do not include Justin Jackson as a first rounder

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We took a SS with a nice bat last year(Justin Jacobs).

 

Just seems like even more reason not to take a SS this year. Unless of course they plan to convert the SS to another position. I also understand stockpiling talent through the draft. I just can't see why you would take a SS when you already have one that has shown amazing potential, and another you drafted last season.

 

I don't understand why you would take a guy with the #12 pick that isnt a need or the best player available.

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Well, someone mentioned(probably Ramp) that Jacobs would possibly have to shift to 3B. I think he is already about Hanleys size if I am not mistaken. But at this point, as far as I know, he is still a SS who was drafted for his bat.

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