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Rule V Draft


Eddie Altamonte

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A.J. Ellis is who we should go after this year in the Rule V draft. He's a catcher in the Dodgers system and this year was his first full year as a starter and he hit .269/.382/.409. He's always had a solid OBP (career .372 in the minors) and he's a very good defensive catcher to boot. He's 26 and I really like him I believe he'll be a very good starter in the bigs.

 

Another guy I like is Jamie D'Antona from the D-Backs system. He hit .308/.363/.499 this season and he's played C, 1b, 3b. He's 25 and I like his bat but dont know how good he is defensively behind the plate. If he can play good D back there he's pretty much a steal for whoever picks him up. A career .290/.352/.472 in the minors.

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A.J. Ellis is who we should go after this year in the Rule V draft. He's a catcher in the Dodgers system and this year was his first full year as a starter and he hit .269/.382/.409. He's always had a solid OBP (career .372 in the minors) and he's a very good defensive catcher to boot. He's 26 and I really like him I believe he'll be a very good starter in the bigs.

 

Another guy I like is Jamie D'Antona from the D-Backs system. He hit .308/.363/.499 this season and he's played C, 1b, 3b. He's 25 and I like his bat but dont know how good he is defensively behind the plate. If he can play good D back there he's pretty much a steal for whoever picks him up. A career .290/.352/.472 in the minors.

 

The D'Backs guy doesn't sound like a bad guy to have, but he also doesn't sound like a real catching prospect.

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One guy who doesn't look bad but may have been added to the 40-man is John Jaso of the D-Rays, a C who batted over .300 with over ten homers last year in AA.

 

Year Age Team PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO AVG OBP SLG OPS

2004 20 A- Hudson Valley Renegades 227 199 34 60 17 2 2 35 22 32 .302 .378 .437 815

2005 21 A Southwest Michigan 388 332 61 102 25 1 14 50 42 53 .307 .383 .515 898

2006 22 A+ Visalia 404 366 58 113 22 0 10 55 30 48 .309 .362 .451 813

2007 23 AA Montgomery 451 380 62 120 24 2 12 71 59 49 .316 .407 .484 891

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One guy who doesn't look bad but may have been added to the 40-man is John Jaso of the D-Rays, a C who batted over .300 with over ten homers last year in AA.

 

Year Age Team PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO AVG OBP SLG OPS

2004 20 A- Hudson Valley Renegades 227 199 34 60 17 2 2 35 22 32 .302 .378 .437 815

2005 21 A Southwest Michigan 388 332 61 102 25 1 14 50 42 53 .307 .383 .515 898

2006 22 A+ Visalia 404 366 58 113 22 0 10 55 30 48 .309 .362 .451 813

2007 23 AA Montgomery 451 380 62 120 24 2 12 71 59 49 .316 .407 .484 891

Yep, unfortunatelt he was added to the 40-man roster.

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One guy who doesn't look bad but may have been added to the 40-man is John Jaso of the D-Rays, a C who batted over .300 with over ten homers last year in AA.

 

Year Age Team PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO AVG OBP SLG OPS

2004 20 A- Hudson Valley Renegades 227 199 34 60 17 2 2 35 22 32 .302 .378 .437 815

2005 21 A Southwest Michigan 388 332 61 102 25 1 14 50 42 53 .307 .383 .515 898

2006 22 A+ Visalia 404 366 58 113 22 0 10 55 30 48 .309 .362 .451 813

2007 23 AA Montgomery 451 380 62 120 24 2 12 71 59 49 .316 .407 .484 891

Yep, unfortunatelt he was added to the 40-man roster.

 

I knew there was a chance he would be, but he hadn't been added when I read a little thing on him. Oh well.

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Randor Bierd, rhp, Tigers

 

Signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2003, Bierd was mediocre for his first two seasons in the States and then needed Tommy John surgery midway through 2005. After pitching at short-season Oneonta in 2006, Bierd took a major step this past season, jumping to Double-A Erie where he finished 3-2, 3.35 with 52 strikeouts in 45 innings. While Bierd has a swing-and-miss 90-93 mph sinking fastball, his solid-average slider also gets a lot of ground balls. And he has the makings of a third pitch with an average changeup.

 

Brian Barton, of, Indians

 

Ever the enigma, Barton went undrafted in 2004 after clubs were scared off by his aerospace engineering major at Miami. The Indians signed him for $100,000 and an additional $100,000 in college funds after a brief showing in the Cape Cod League and Barton has not looked back. A five-tool player who can play all three outfield spots, Barton has been hampered by a lingering knee injury since his breakout year in 2006 when he hit .322 with 19 homers and swiped 41 bags in 49 attempts. Even with the knee problem, Barton still turned in a .305/.402/.420 season in 2007, finishing the year in Triple-A. Quiet and leading through example through his 2006 season, some scouts expressed concerns about Barton's demeanor. "I loved him that first year in Double-A," one scout from a National League club said. "But this past year, it was almost like he'd earned this elite status and you saw him have this lackadaisical approach to the game that wasn't there before. Where he was playing with chips on both shoulders with something to prove initially, that part of his game was replaced by some sort of false bravado. He's really tough to get a handle on, but the tools are very real."

 

Garrett Guzman, of, Twins

 

Guzman missed the entire 2005 season after breaking his neck in a car accident just days before leaving for spring training that year. Now 25, the undersized lefthanded hitter profiles as arguably the best fourth outfielder candidate on the Rule 5 eligible list, drawing comparisons to Orlando Palmeiro. While Palmeiro was a bit better runner and defender, Guzman offers more power and offensive upside. Guzman, who batted .312/.359/.453 at Double-A New Britain in 2007, has solid gap power and the ability to play anywhere in the outfield, though he profiles best in left. "He probably doesn't run as well (as Palmeiro) but they're very similar players who can do a lot of things for you," said one National League scout.

 

Carlos Guevara, rhp, Reds

 

A 2003 seventh-round pick out of St. Mary's (Texas) University, Guevara repeated at Double-A Chattanooga despite an impressive season with 89 in 77 innings in 2006. Guevara was just as good if not better in 2007, averaging 12.63 K/9, and should be an easy Rule 5 decision for a club searching for middle relief. Guevara has one plus pitch, but it's the niche of that pitch being a screwball that helps spike his value, and explain why he's available, as some scouts dismiss him as a trick-pitch artist. The rest of Guevara's stuff is fringe-average, but he could be a solid addition for clubs in need of bullpen arms.

 

Samuel Deduno, rhp, Rockies

 

The Rockies signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2003, and he was the Rookie-level Pioneer League pitcher of the year two years later in his U.S. debut. Effectively wild, Deduno doesn't have overpowering stuff, but misses a lot of bats with average command of his 91-92 mph fastball and a 70 curveball, all on the 20-80 scouting scale. After leading the minors with 34 wild pitches in 2006, Deduno lowered that number to 13 this year. He can lose his release point very easily at times. Deduno was shut down in winter ball with elbow soreness, but several clubs were still expressing interest in the 24-year-old. He went 6-9, 5.53 with 8.6 K/9 in 2007.

 

The following players were receiving strong consideration for the Rule 5 draft in December:

 

Kyle Aselton, lhp, Twins

Overlooked in Twins system; arm strength with low 90s heat

Jesus Castillo, rhp, Dodgers

Fastball command to both sides; up to 94 mph in winter ball

Jamie D'Antona, 3b/c, Diamondbacks

Second straight year left unprotected, can play 1b, 3b or c

Jose de la Cruz, rhp, Mariners

Six-foot-6 righthander with power sinker and added a split

Diory Hernandez, ss, Braves

Plus runner with easy actions; uses the whole field

Fernando Hernandez, rhp, White Sox

Matt Guerrier-type righthander with plus moxie

Dusty Hughes, rhp, Royals

Strong Arizona Fall League effort boosts short guy's stock

Steven Jackson, rhp, Yankees

Strong, physical presence and has yet to reach his ceiling

Preston Larrison, rhp, Tigers

Very heavy lower half, but can be effective out of the pen

Shane Lindsay, rhp, Rockies

Health is a major issue, but showed power stuff in Hawaii

Yohan Pino, rhp, Twins

Great feel to pitch with a four fringe-average pitches

Tony Richie, c, Cubs

Solid catch-and-throw guy who hits a little bit

Kyle Schmidt, rhp, Orioles

Medical baggage, but bounced back with 145 whiffs in 131 IP

Leyson Septimo, lhp, Diamondbacks

Converted outfielder reportedly hit triple-digits this fall

Brett Smith, rhp, Yankees

Solid-average stuff, doesn't pitch with his fastball enough

Von Stertzbach, rhp, Angels

Profiles as a solid bullpen guy with above-average slider

Chris Stewart, c, Rangers

Solid defender with the big leagues already on his resume

Luis Valbuena, 2b, Mariners

Outstanding defender with interesting lefty bat

Marwin Vega, rhp, Mariners

Three average pitches with a lively 91-93 mph fastball

Matt Whitney, 1b, Indians

Blasting 32 homers might be enough to get Whitney noticed

 

Getting Barton would be awesome

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Randor Bierd, rhp, Tigers

 

Signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2003, Bierd was mediocre for his first two seasons in the States and then needed Tommy John surgery midway through 2005. After pitching at short-season Oneonta in 2006, Bierd took a major step this past season, jumping to Double-A Erie where he finished 3-2, 3.35 with 52 strikeouts in 45 innings. While Bierd has a swing-and-miss 90-93 mph sinking fastball, his solid-average slider also gets a lot of ground balls. And he has the makings of a third pitch with an average changeup.

 

Brian Barton, of, Indians

 

Ever the enigma, Barton went undrafted in 2004 after clubs were scared off by his aerospace engineering major at Miami. The Indians signed him for $100,000 and an additional $100,000 in college funds after a brief showing in the Cape Cod League and Barton has not looked back. A five-tool player who can play all three outfield spots, Barton has been hampered by a lingering knee injury since his breakout year in 2006 when he hit .322 with 19 homers and swiped 41 bags in 49 attempts. Even with the knee problem, Barton still turned in a .305/.402/.420 season in 2007, finishing the year in Triple-A. Quiet and leading through example through his 2006 season, some scouts expressed concerns about Barton's demeanor. "I loved him that first year in Double-A," one scout from a National League club said. "But this past year, it was almost like he'd earned this elite status and you saw him have this lackadaisical approach to the game that wasn't there before. Where he was playing with chips on both shoulders with something to prove initially, that part of his game was replaced by some sort of false bravado. He's really tough to get a handle on, but the tools are very real."

 

Garrett Guzman, of, Twins

 

Guzman missed the entire 2005 season after breaking his neck in a car accident just days before leaving for spring training that year. Now 25, the undersized lefthanded hitter profiles as arguably the best fourth outfielder candidate on the Rule 5 eligible list, drawing comparisons to Orlando Palmeiro. While Palmeiro was a bit better runner and defender, Guzman offers more power and offensive upside. Guzman, who batted .312/.359/.453 at Double-A New Britain in 2007, has solid gap power and the ability to play anywhere in the outfield, though he profiles best in left. "He probably doesn't run as well (as Palmeiro) but they're very similar players who can do a lot of things for you," said one National League scout.

 

Carlos Guevara, rhp, Reds

 

A 2003 seventh-round pick out of St. Mary's (Texas) University, Guevara repeated at Double-A Chattanooga despite an impressive season with 89 in 77 innings in 2006. Guevara was just as good if not better in 2007, averaging 12.63 K/9, and should be an easy Rule 5 decision for a club searching for middle relief. Guevara has one plus pitch, but it's the niche of that pitch being a screwball that helps spike his value, and explain why he's available, as some scouts dismiss him as a trick-pitch artist. The rest of Guevara's stuff is fringe-average, but he could be a solid addition for clubs in need of bullpen arms.

 

Samuel Deduno, rhp, Rockies

 

The Rockies signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2003, and he was the Rookie-level Pioneer League pitcher of the year two years later in his U.S. debut. Effectively wild, Deduno doesn't have overpowering stuff, but misses a lot of bats with average command of his 91-92 mph fastball and a 70 curveball, all on the 20-80 scouting scale. After leading the minors with 34 wild pitches in 2006, Deduno lowered that number to 13 this year. He can lose his release point very easily at times. Deduno was shut down in winter ball with elbow soreness, but several clubs were still expressing interest in the 24-year-old. He went 6-9, 5.53 with 8.6 K/9 in 2007.

 

The following players were receiving strong consideration for the Rule 5 draft in December:

 

Kyle Aselton, lhp, Twins

Overlooked in Twins system; arm strength with low 90s heat

Jesus Castillo, rhp, Dodgers

Fastball command to both sides; up to 94 mph in winter ball

Jamie D'Antona, 3b/c, Diamondbacks

Second straight year left unprotected, can play 1b, 3b or c

Jose de la Cruz, rhp, Mariners

Six-foot-6 righthander with power sinker and added a split

Diory Hernandez, ss, Braves

Plus runner with easy actions; uses the whole field

Fernando Hernandez, rhp, White Sox

Matt Guerrier-type righthander with plus moxie

Dusty Hughes, rhp, Royals

Strong Arizona Fall League effort boosts short guy's stock

Steven Jackson, rhp, Yankees

Strong, physical presence and has yet to reach his ceiling

Preston Larrison, rhp, Tigers

Very heavy lower half, but can be effective out of the pen

Shane Lindsay, rhp, Rockies

Health is a major issue, but showed power stuff in Hawaii

Yohan Pino, rhp, Twins

Great feel to pitch with a four fringe-average pitches

Tony Richie, c, Cubs

Solid catch-and-throw guy who hits a little bit

Kyle Schmidt, rhp, Orioles

Medical baggage, but bounced back with 145 whiffs in 131 IP

Leyson Septimo, lhp, Diamondbacks

Converted outfielder reportedly hit triple-digits this fall

Brett Smith, rhp, Yankees

Solid-average stuff, doesn't pitch with his fastball enough

Von Stertzbach, rhp, Angels

Profiles as a solid bullpen guy with above-average slider

Chris Stewart, c, Rangers

Solid defender with the big leagues already on his resume

Luis Valbuena, 2b, Mariners

Outstanding defender with interesting lefty bat

Marwin Vega, rhp, Mariners

Three average pitches with a lively 91-93 mph fastball

Matt Whitney, 1b, Indians

Blasting 32 homers might be enough to get Whitney noticed

 

 

:mis2

 

Why are Chris Seddon, Ross Wolf, and Alejadro De Aza still on 40 man roster again? (giving Marcos Carvajal and Daniel Barone a free pass here) seriously? especially considering we loss Zarate and J. Garcia.

 

Anyways wouldn't mind if we took some of the guys I bolded.

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Randor Bierd, rhp, Tigers

 

Signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2003, Bierd was mediocre for his first two seasons in the States and then needed Tommy John surgery midway through 2005. After pitching at short-season Oneonta in 2006, Bierd took a major step this past season, jumping to Double-A Erie where he finished 3-2, 3.35 with 52 strikeouts in 45 innings. While Bierd has a swing-and-miss 90-93 mph sinking fastball, his solid-average slider also gets a lot of ground balls. And he has the makings of a third pitch with an average changeup.

 

Brian Barton, of, Indians

 

Ever the enigma, Barton went undrafted in 2004 after clubs were scared off by his aerospace engineering major at Miami. The Indians signed him for $100,000 and an additional $100,000 in college funds after a brief showing in the Cape Cod League and Barton has not looked back. A five-tool player who can play all three outfield spots, Barton has been hampered by a lingering knee injury since his breakout year in 2006 when he hit .322 with 19 homers and swiped 41 bags in 49 attempts. Even with the knee problem, Barton still turned in a .305/.402/.420 season in 2007, finishing the year in Triple-A. Quiet and leading through example through his 2006 season, some scouts expressed concerns about Barton's demeanor. "I loved him that first year in Double-A," one scout from a National League club said. "But this past year, it was almost like he'd earned this elite status and you saw him have this lackadaisical approach to the game that wasn't there before. Where he was playing with chips on both shoulders with something to prove initially, that part of his game was replaced by some sort of false bravado. He's really tough to get a handle on, but the tools are very real."

 

Garrett Guzman, of, Twins

 

Guzman missed the entire 2005 season after breaking his neck in a car accident just days before leaving for spring training that year. Now 25, the undersized lefthanded hitter profiles as arguably the best fourth outfielder candidate on the Rule 5 eligible list, drawing comparisons to Orlando Palmeiro. While Palmeiro was a bit better runner and defender, Guzman offers more power and offensive upside. Guzman, who batted .312/.359/.453 at Double-A New Britain in 2007, has solid gap power and the ability to play anywhere in the outfield, though he profiles best in left. "He probably doesn't run as well (as Palmeiro) but they're very similar players who can do a lot of things for you," said one National League scout.

 

Carlos Guevara, rhp, Reds

 

A 2003 seventh-round pick out of St. Mary's (Texas) University, Guevara repeated at Double-A Chattanooga despite an impressive season with 89 in 77 innings in 2006. Guevara was just as good if not better in 2007, averaging 12.63 K/9, and should be an easy Rule 5 decision for a club searching for middle relief. Guevara has one plus pitch, but it's the niche of that pitch being a screwball that helps spike his value, and explain why he's available, as some scouts dismiss him as a trick-pitch artist. The rest of Guevara's stuff is fringe-average, but he could be a solid addition for clubs in need of bullpen arms.

 

Samuel Deduno, rhp, Rockies

 

The Rockies signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2003, and he was the Rookie-level Pioneer League pitcher of the year two years later in his U.S. debut. Effectively wild, Deduno doesn't have overpowering stuff, but misses a lot of bats with average command of his 91-92 mph fastball and a 70 curveball, all on the 20-80 scouting scale. After leading the minors with 34 wild pitches in 2006, Deduno lowered that number to 13 this year. He can lose his release point very easily at times. Deduno was shut down in winter ball with elbow soreness, but several clubs were still expressing interest in the 24-year-old. He went 6-9, 5.53 with 8.6 K/9 in 2007.

 

The following players were receiving strong consideration for the Rule 5 draft in December:

 

Kyle Aselton, lhp, Twins

Overlooked in Twins system; arm strength with low 90s heat

Jesus Castillo, rhp, Dodgers

Fastball command to both sides; up to 94 mph in winter ball

Jamie D'Antona, 3b/c, Diamondbacks

Second straight year left unprotected, can play 1b, 3b or c

Jose de la Cruz, rhp, Mariners

Six-foot-6 righthander with power sinker and added a split

Diory Hernandez, ss, Braves

Plus runner with easy actions; uses the whole field

Fernando Hernandez, rhp, White Sox

Matt Guerrier-type righthander with plus moxie

Dusty Hughes, rhp, Royals

Strong Arizona Fall League effort boosts short guy's stock

Steven Jackson, rhp, Yankees

Strong, physical presence and has yet to reach his ceiling

Preston Larrison, rhp, Tigers

Very heavy lower half, but can be effective out of the pen

Shane Lindsay, rhp, Rockies

Health is a major issue, but showed power stuff in Hawaii

Yohan Pino, rhp, Twins

Great feel to pitch with a four fringe-average pitches

Tony Richie, c, Cubs

Solid catch-and-throw guy who hits a little bit

Kyle Schmidt, rhp, Orioles

Medical baggage, but bounced back with 145 whiffs in 131 IP

Leyson Septimo, lhp, Diamondbacks

Converted outfielder reportedly hit triple-digits this fall

Brett Smith, rhp, Yankees

Solid-average stuff, doesn't pitch with his fastball enough

Von Stertzbach, rhp, Angels

Profiles as a solid bullpen guy with above-average slider

Chris Stewart, c, Rangers

Solid defender with the big leagues already on his resume

Luis Valbuena, 2b, Mariners

Outstanding defender with interesting lefty bat

Marwin Vega, rhp, Mariners

Three average pitches with a lively 91-93 mph fastball

Matt Whitney, 1b, Indians

Blasting 32 homers might be enough to get Whitney noticed

 

Getting Barton would be awesome

 

Ditto, if he's there and we don't take a shot at him I'm gonna suspect our FO isn't even trying.

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Randor Bierd, rhp, Tigers

 

Signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2003, Bierd was mediocre for his first two seasons in the States and then needed Tommy John surgery midway through 2005. After pitching at short-season Oneonta in 2006, Bierd took a major step this past season, jumping to Double-A Erie where he finished 3-2, 3.35 with 52 strikeouts in 45 innings. While Bierd has a swing-and-miss 90-93 mph sinking fastball, his solid-average slider also gets a lot of ground balls. And he has the makings of a third pitch with an average changeup.

 

Brian Barton, of, Indians

 

Ever the enigma, Barton went undrafted in 2004 after clubs were scared off by his aerospace engineering major at Miami. The Indians signed him for $100,000 and an additional $100,000 in college funds after a brief showing in the Cape Cod League and Barton has not looked back. A five-tool player who can play all three outfield spots, Barton has been hampered by a lingering knee injury since his breakout year in 2006 when he hit .322 with 19 homers and swiped 41 bags in 49 attempts. Even with the knee problem, Barton still turned in a .305/.402/.420 season in 2007, finishing the year in Triple-A. Quiet and leading through example through his 2006 season, some scouts expressed concerns about Barton's demeanor. "I loved him that first year in Double-A," one scout from a National League club said. "But this past year, it was almost like he'd earned this elite status and you saw him have this lackadaisical approach to the game that wasn't there before. Where he was playing with chips on both shoulders with something to prove initially, that part of his game was replaced by some sort of false bravado. He's really tough to get a handle on, but the tools are very real."

 

Garrett Guzman, of, Twins

 

Guzman missed the entire 2005 season after breaking his neck in a car accident just days before leaving for spring training that year. Now 25, the undersized lefthanded hitter profiles as arguably the best fourth outfielder candidate on the Rule 5 eligible list, drawing comparisons to Orlando Palmeiro. While Palmeiro was a bit better runner and defender, Guzman offers more power and offensive upside. Guzman, who batted .312/.359/.453 at Double-A New Britain in 2007, has solid gap power and the ability to play anywhere in the outfield, though he profiles best in left. "He probably doesn't run as well (as Palmeiro) but they're very similar players who can do a lot of things for you," said one National League scout.

 

Carlos Guevara, rhp, Reds

 

A 2003 seventh-round pick out of St. Mary's (Texas) University, Guevara repeated at Double-A Chattanooga despite an impressive season with 89 in 77 innings in 2006. Guevara was just as good if not better in 2007, averaging 12.63 K/9, and should be an easy Rule 5 decision for a club searching for middle relief. Guevara has one plus pitch, but it's the niche of that pitch being a screwball that helps spike his value, and explain why he's available, as some scouts dismiss him as a trick-pitch artist. The rest of Guevara's stuff is fringe-average, but he could be a solid addition for clubs in need of bullpen arms.

 

Samuel Deduno, rhp, Rockies

 

The Rockies signed out of the Dominican Republic in 2003, and he was the Rookie-level Pioneer League pitcher of the year two years later in his U.S. debut. Effectively wild, Deduno doesn't have overpowering stuff, but misses a lot of bats with average command of his 91-92 mph fastball and a 70 curveball, all on the 20-80 scouting scale. After leading the minors with 34 wild pitches in 2006, Deduno lowered that number to 13 this year. He can lose his release point very easily at times. Deduno was shut down in winter ball with elbow soreness, but several clubs were still expressing interest in the 24-year-old. He went 6-9, 5.53 with 8.6 K/9 in 2007.

 

The following players were receiving strong consideration for the Rule 5 draft in December:

 

Kyle Aselton, lhp, Twins

Overlooked in Twins system; arm strength with low 90s heat

Jesus Castillo, rhp, Dodgers

Fastball command to both sides; up to 94 mph in winter ball

Jamie D'Antona, 3b/c, Diamondbacks

Second straight year left unprotected, can play 1b, 3b or c

Jose de la Cruz, rhp, Mariners

Six-foot-6 righthander with power sinker and added a split

Diory Hernandez, ss, Braves

Plus runner with easy actions; uses the whole field

Fernando Hernandez, rhp, White Sox

Matt Guerrier-type righthander with plus moxie

Dusty Hughes, rhp, Royals

Strong Arizona Fall League effort boosts short guy's stock

Steven Jackson, rhp, Yankees

Strong, physical presence and has yet to reach his ceiling

Preston Larrison, rhp, Tigers

Very heavy lower half, but can be effective out of the pen

Shane Lindsay, rhp, Rockies

Health is a major issue, but showed power stuff in Hawaii

Yohan Pino, rhp, Twins

Great feel to pitch with a four fringe-average pitches

Tony Richie, c, Cubs

Solid catch-and-throw guy who hits a little bit

Kyle Schmidt, rhp, Orioles

Medical baggage, but bounced back with 145 whiffs in 131 IP

Leyson Septimo, lhp, Diamondbacks

Converted outfielder reportedly hit triple-digits this fall

Brett Smith, rhp, Yankees

Solid-average stuff, doesn't pitch with his fastball enough

Von Stertzbach, rhp, Angels

Profiles as a solid bullpen guy with above-average slider

Chris Stewart, c, Rangers

Solid defender with the big leagues already on his resume

Luis Valbuena, 2b, Mariners

Outstanding defender with interesting lefty bat

Marwin Vega, rhp, Mariners

Three average pitches with a lively 91-93 mph fastball

Matt Whitney, 1b, Indians

Blasting 32 homers might be enough to get Whitney noticed

 

Getting Barton would be awesome

 

Tony Richie!

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Wow, I didn't realize Brian Barton was eligible. He would be a great pick up and can actually play CF.

 

He is the perfect Rule V pick: At the least he can contribute on a 25 man roster at the MLB level by being a 5th outfielder type with great speed and ability to play all three OF positions while the same time offering a nice upside.

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