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Selig's Term Extended through 2012


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http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20...sp&c_id=mlb

 

Selig's term extended through 2012

Three-year extension ratified at Thursday's owner's meetingBy Barry M. Bloom / MLB.com

 

Bud Selig is entering his 16th full season as Commissioner. (Aude Guerrucci)

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Commissioner Bud Selig's contract has been extended by Major League Baseball's 30 owners for three years, taking him through the 2012 season.

The decision was made in an executive council meeting on Wednesday and was ratified by the owners on Thursday, making the new deal the most significant news that came out of this year's first quarterly meetings. But the ground began to swell for an extension after the previous owners meetings this past November in Naples, Fla.

 

Lew Wolff, owner of the Oakland A's and a frat buddy of Selig's when both attended the University of Wisconsin, said he sent an e-mail to Selig last month professing those feelings in a six-word statement: "You can't retire until I expire."

 

"I looked at that about four times a day," Selig said on Thursday. "And actually began to take it quite seriously."

 

So did the collective owners who asked Selig to step out of both sessions as they briefly debated the merits of the extension. When the doors swung open, Selig returned to loud standing ovations.

 

"I spent a lot of time agonizing over it, mainly with myself," Selig said about agreeing to the consensus growing among the owners. "I had to make a decision. But they really convinced me."

 

The owners again endorsed Selig, who replaced the deposed Fay Vincent on an interim basis on Sept. 9, 1992, on the heels of the release last month of the Mitchell Report, the result of an investigation into the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball. At Tuesday's four-hour Congressional hearing on Capitol Hill, the Commissioner was commended by a number of elected officials for having the foresight to seek former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell to spearhead the investigation.

 

"This was well-deserved, well-earned," said Ken Kendrick, who replaced Jerry Colangelo as managing general partner of the Diamondbacks in 2004. "I'm relatively new at this, but he's done an outstanding job for all of us."

 

Selig, 73, just finished his 15th full season as Commissioner. As a business, the sport has never done better, setting records last season in gross revenue ($6.1 billion) and total attendance (79.5 million). Projections right now are for attendance to easily soar over the 80 million ticket mark and revenue to surpass $6.5 billion in 2008.

 

The sky's the limit, Selig said about the future of the sport.

 

"I will make this prediction to you," he said. "By the time I leave, you won't recognize this sport. It's going to be that much more popular and we'll have branched out into so many other things. This sport is poised right now, really poised to take a quantum leap into the future."

 

When Selig will leave is certainly a matter of conjecture. At the end of his extended term he'll have been in office 20 years, second only to the 24-year run of Kenesaw Mountain Landis, baseball's first Commissioner, who was hired in 1920 in the wake of the Black Sox scandal and died in office in 1944.

 

Selig had said a few years ago that he would retire at the end of his current term, which was set to expire after the 2009 season, saying during a conference early last year that, "Even in Monopoly, you get a 'Get Out Of Jail Free' card, and I'm going to use mine." But at the same time he backed off that assessment a bit, saying, "You never say never about anything."

 

Similarly, in 2003 he also mused that he would probably retire at the end of his term, but on Aug. 17, 2004, the owners extended him through 2009.

 

On Thursday, though, Selig declined to leave his tenure open-ended.

 

"Look, when this is over I'm going to be 78 years old," he said. "And I know what people will be saying at that point. But I can say this without equivocation: at age 78, my wife better come and grab me out of here. I'm very comfortable telling you that."

 

Selig, who once owned the Milwaukee Brewers, was given the job as Commissioner permanently on July 7, 1998, and since then has presided over unparalleled labor peace and an economic sea change in a sport that was barely generating more than $1 billion a year in revenue at the time he took over as baseball's ninth Commissioner.

 

Under his watch, Selig fought for and won approval for Interleague Play, the consolidation of the American League and National League under one office, the three-division format and a Wild Card berth in each league, the unbalanced schedule, worldwide recognition of the sport, steroids testing of Major League players beginning in 2003 and home-field advantage in the World Series for the winning league in the All-Star Game.

 

For the third time, MLB is slated to open its regular season in Japan, with the A's set to match the defending World Series champion Red Sox in March at Tokyo Dome. Also in March, the Padres and Dodgers are projected to play exhibition games in Beijing, the first time Major League games will be played in China. Selig said he plans to be at both events.

 

And in 2009, the second World Baseball Classic is scheduled to be played, capitalizing on its popular inaugural in 2006.

 

All this and more are the reasons why the owners want to keep him in place.

 

"I just want to make it clear that this has all been coming from the clubs who were unanimous in their desire to not only compliment the Commissioner on his leadership, but also to insure stability for a few more years moving forward," said Tom Werner, the chairman of the Red Sox who was the majority owner of the Padres in 1992 when Selig took over. "I know the Commissioner wrestled with the decision to remain, but his devotion to the game during his tenure has been stellar."

 

To be sure, it hasn't always been sugar and roses. Early on Selig's watch, MLB was fractured by the 1994 player strike that abruptly ended that season, led to the cancellation of the World Series and delayed the start of the 1995 season. But it was the last event of its kind.

 

In 2002, the owners and players avoided the ninth consecutive work stoppage over three decades when they signed a four-year Basic Agreement that distributed revenue more liberally from the big-revenue clubs to the smaller ones. Likewise in 2006, the two sides extended the agreement for six years, assuring labor peace through 2012, which coincidentally coincides with the expiration of the Commissioner's latest contract.

 

Until then, Selig, well-known for his indefatigable energy, said he plans to continue at the same pace. "I love the job," he said. "I don't plan to change a thing."

 

:banghead :banghead :banghead

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I don't know why the unbalanced schedule should be considered an "accomplishment" - I hate how you see two teams at one place only to see them playing again at the other's stadium the next week. I prefer variety, and don't really buy the argument that it's good for rivalries - more games just seems to make them less important. I don't like how real major league games are being played abroad either, since it means that some teams are left with less home games.

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I don't know why the unbalanced schedule should be considered an "accomplishment" - I hate how you see two teams at one place only to see them playing again at the other's stadium the next week. I prefer variety, and don't really buy the argument that it's good for rivalries - more games just seems to make them less important. I don't like how real major league games are being played abroad either, since it means that some teams are left with less home games.

The wildcard? Thats what I think was the best move.

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Selig has done great things for Major League Baseball.

 

The 3 division + wildcard format is amazing.

 

Interleague play is kinda cool

 

Home Field Advantage to the winner of the AS game is great

 

and the World Baseball Classic was a magnificent idea as well, it hasnt shown its immediate effects yet, but years from now the WBC will be huge and it's great for marketing.

 

And yet all of the great things Selig has done are often overlooked because of the Steroids Era, but hey...he admits it was his fault as well as Major league Baseball's fault for allowing it and he is dedicated to never letting it happen again

 

Hats off to Bud, he's been great, and he rightfully deserves the extention

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Selig has done great things for Major League Baseball.

 

The 3 division + wildcard format is amazing.

 

Interleague play is kinda cool

 

Home Field Advantage to the winner of the AS game is great

 

and the World Baseball Classic was a magnificent idea as well, it hasnt shown its immediate effects yet, but years from now the WBC will be huge and it's great for marketing.

 

And yet all of the great things Selig has done are often overlooked because of the Steroids Era, but hey...he admits it was his fault as well as Major league Baseball's fault for allowing it and he is dedicated to never letting it happen again

 

Hats off to Bud, he's been great, and he rightfully deserves the extention

 

What he brought to the game was great, but what he let happen under his control is bad. I think the steroid cloud is largely under his control and his fault. I think he is most to blame for the steroid era. After the strike the league was looking for anything to come back and the HR chase was that.

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Selig has done great things for Major League Baseball.

 

The 3 division + wildcard format is amazing.

 

Interleague play is kinda cool

 

Home Field Advantage to the winner of the AS game is great

 

and the World Baseball Classic was a magnificent idea as well, it hasnt shown its immediate effects yet, but years from now the WBC will be huge and it's great for marketing.

 

And yet all of the great things Selig has done are often overlooked because of the Steroids Era, but hey...he admits it was his fault as well as Major league Baseball's fault for allowing it and he is dedicated to never letting it happen again

 

Hats off to Bud, he's been great, and he rightfully deserves the extention

 

What he brought to the game was great, but what he let happen under his control is bad. I think the steroid cloud is largely under his control and his fault. I think he is most to blame for the steroid era. After the strike the league was looking for anything to come back and the HR chase was that.

 

Ok but should all of the good things he has done be pushed aside just because he made one mistake? Like I said before, at least he admits he's at fault and is working his hardest to prevent it ever happening again.

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Selig has done great things for Major League Baseball.

 

The 3 division + wildcard format is amazing.

 

Interleague play is kinda cool

 

Home Field Advantage to the winner of the AS game is great

 

and the World Baseball Classic was a magnificent idea as well, it hasnt shown its immediate effects yet, but years from now the WBC will be huge and it's great for marketing.

 

And yet all of the great things Selig has done are often overlooked because of the Steroids Era, but hey...he admits it was his fault as well as Major league Baseball's fault for allowing it and he is dedicated to never letting it happen again

 

Hats off to Bud, he's been great, and he rightfully deserves the extention

 

What he brought to the game was great, but what he let happen under his control is bad. I think the steroid cloud is largely under his control and his fault. I think he is most to blame for the steroid era. After the strike the league was looking for anything to come back and the HR chase was that.

 

Ok but should all of the good things he has done be pushed aside just because he made one mistake? Like I said before, at least he admits he's at fault and is working his hardest to prevent it ever happening again.

 

No but I think instead of extending him now, they should wait til his term is up and see how the mitchell report finishes. We should also see what happens next before we reward him again.

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Selig has done great things for Major League Baseball.

 

The 3 division + wildcard format is amazing.

 

Interleague play is kinda cool

 

Home Field Advantage to the winner of the AS game is great

 

and the World Baseball Classic was a magnificent idea as well, it hasnt shown its immediate effects yet, but years from now the WBC will be huge and it's great for marketing.

 

And yet all of the great things Selig has done are often overlooked because of the Steroids Era, but hey...he admits it was his fault as well as Major league Baseball's fault for allowing it and he is dedicated to never letting it happen again

 

Hats off to Bud, he's been great, and he rightfully deserves the extention

Bud Light has not been great but has actually been able to make baseball a healthy profittable enterprise once more. Selig as a commisioner has been flawed and weak, but the proof of the pudding is in the eating...The game is thriving and is wonderful as ever. Can we now please eliminate inter-league play or at least reduce it?

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Whats wrong with World Series home field advantage being determined by the Allstar Game?

 

Before, the All Star Game was just kinda irrelevant and something you don't really look forward to watching. Plus, the players in the late 80s, 90s, and early 2000s didn't really take the game seriously. Now, it gives the players something to play for, especially if their team is contending that year, and it makes the game something that the fans are going to want to see

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Whats wrong with World Series home field advantage being determined by the Allstar Game?

 

Before, the All Star Game was just kinda irrelevant and something you don't really look forward to watching. Plus, the players in the late 80s, 90s, and early 2000s didn't really take the game seriously. Now, it gives the players something to play for, especially if their team is contending that year, and it makes the game something that the fans are going to want to see

 

I like that rule to actually. Except Boston has been screwed over its 2 world series wins for not getting to play at home! :confused

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bud selig is awful and he quite obviously encouraged the steroid era...plus home field advantage in the all star game is a woeful idea...plus the unbalanced scheduling makes me want to shoot someone...i cant wait until this geezer is gone and baseball will be much better off the day that happens

 

We might see ole' bud in there posthumously :D

 

Sort of like the Democratic Republic of Korea

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There is no question that when baseball historians finally get around to studying the Selig Era (and who knows when that era finally would end :rolleyes: ) that Bud will go down in history as one of the more (if not THE MOST) controversial and debated commissioners in the modern era. Now, this is NOT to argue on whether he has been the best or even one of the best. Yet, we must acknowledge the impact (and its associated lasting repercussions) on the game brought on by decisions taken directly by him or the influence brought upon by his ideas and the reactions to his ideas (i.e. the players and owners).

 

Also, note that he was always brought on as the owners' revenge for their dislike of Fay Vincent's decision-making (which would make for an argument FOR Fay Vincent as a better commissioner than we may realize). Bud, being Mr. Consensus (not my term), has managed to somehow convince 30 different owners (from cheapskates like Pohlad and Reinsdorf and "paupers" like McClatchey and Loria to big-money men like Steinbrenner and Henry) to believe in his general direction. Previous commissioners enjoyed much greater powers than he has going for him but those powers were stripped after Fay Vincent. So Bud's an Owner's Commissioner. The owners wanted him because they wanted more influence in the Commissioners' Office in the end game of gaining leverage on the players in labor negotiations.

 

They succeeded. The players DID strike in 1994. They DID NOT strike in 2002 nor in 2006. To the owners, they DIDN'T CARE how they got to that goal only that they got there. The players just wanted to let fans know that they want to play and please the fans, so they agreed to revenue-sharing and a luxury tax on the Yankees (OK, technically, those teams who spend a certain % above a $#, but you KNOW who that was meant for). The owners wanted (and still want) a salary cap but they knew that they would be overreaching, risking permanent fan alienation. So they took the next best thing.

 

And that, my friends, is why Bud's staying on. The owners like what they got and they're not going let that advantage slip by just yet.

 

Now, we get to the now and the obvious question is did they make the right call. I would say no. My reasoning on this is that I think that while there was a time when the BUSINESS of baseball was the most pressing issue affecting the game, today is the GAME of baseball that is the most pressing issue. In particular, how long will the fans tolerate the quality of play that we have to watch? There is a point to be made about the ratings that came in during the last World Series. The conventional wisdom is that because the games were at night that too many people couldn't stay up to watch. I think that beyond the diehards, people need to be entertained to high-quality, well-played games to keep their attention. While the Rockies made an unbelievable run to the Series, it also exposed glaring weaknesses in the National League and even the Yankees, as "bad" as they were last year, could've beat them. My gut feeling is that the American League will enjoy similar advantages this year as well.

 

Funny thing because if this current All-Star rule were in place in the 1970s and 1980s, the National League would have always enjoyed home-field advantage. We may have seen more champions like the Cardinals, Reds, Mets and Dodgers and less Yankee, A's and Oriole championships. But that would be a what-if scenario for another debate. :thumbup

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Whats wrong with World Series home field advantage being determined by the Allstar Game?

 

Before, the All Star Game was just kinda irrelevant and something you don't really look forward to watching. Plus, the players in the late 80s, 90s, and early 2000s didn't really take the game seriously. Now, it gives the players something to play for, especially if their team is contending that year, and it makes the game something that the fans are going to want to see

the all-star game's supposed to be like a big fun exhibition game. it shouldn't determine anything for any team.

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Whats wrong with World Series home field advantage being determined by the Allstar Game?

 

Before, the All Star Game was just kinda irrelevant and something you don't really look forward to watching. Plus, the players in the late 80s, 90s, and early 2000s didn't really take the game seriously. Now, it gives the players something to play for, especially if their team is contending that year, and it makes the game something that the fans are going to want to see

the all-star game's supposed to be like a big fun exhibition game. it shouldn't determine anything for any team.

 

 

zzzZZZzzz

 

sorry, but thats pretty boring.

 

At least with the game meaning something it

 

A) Gives the players a reason to play

 

B) Gives the fans a reason to watch

 

Having said that, it's good for marketing which in turn brings greater interest to the game which brings in money... It's win-win

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Whats wrong with World Series home field advantage being determined by the Allstar Game?

 

Before, the All Star Game was just kinda irrelevant and something you don't really look forward to watching. Plus, the players in the late 80s, 90s, and early 2000s didn't really take the game ser

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