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HawkFan
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Now that we're almost a full season into our new digs, I was curious what the autograph situation is? I'm going to tomorrow's game, and is the first time I've gone down since the Yankees exhibitions. At the time, it didn't look to be autograph friendly, as all of the lower level seats around the field and dugouts had restricted access and it's too far a drop from the seats to the bullpen.

 

After-game appeared more promising than JRS, however, as the players look like they get to their cars in the garage through the plaza.

 

Thanks!

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I've never been able to get to the game early enough, so almost all my Marlins autographed balls were purchased through the MLB store. I bought a LoMo signed ball a year or two ago that was super cheap, and a JJ ball two years ago that was also surprisingly very cheap considering the numbers he was putting up at the time.

 

Last year a friend gave me as a gift a Mike Stanton rookie card signed by Stanton, which I have in the safety deposit box in the bank. It may not be worth a lot now, but I'm still fairly young. In 50 years (if no accident or unexpected illness takes me before that) I figured it would make a great gift to a grandchild..and hopefully it will be worth something then.

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After the game, go down to the third base parking garage and hang out outside. Players start to come out of the ballpark usually around 30 - 45 minutes after the game is over. Some stop to sign and some don't. I guess it depends on their mood that day.

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Thanks everybody. Wasn't sure about pregame, as they were only allowing people with tickets in those sections down there back in April. They had waist-high barriers leading from the stadium to the garage after the game, figured that was the walkway for the players. Whole lot more difficult for players to ignore fans on both sides of you than their setup at JRS. Anyone know how accessible the visitors' bus is, and where they leave?

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Last year a friend gave me as a gift a Mike Stanton rookie card signed by Stanton, which I have in the safety deposit box in the bank. It may not be worth a lot now, but I'm still fairly young. In 50 years (if no accident or unexpected illness takes me before that) I figured it would make a great gift to a grandchild..and hopefully it will be worth something then.

 

Honestly, even if Stanton has a career on par with Bonds or Aaron, it's not going to be worth enough to justify a safety deposit box. He would have to put up an amazing career and then die the day after he retired or something to even have a chance. Trust me, this is coming from someone who has collected baseball autographs/memorabilia for like 15 years now.

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Autographs/memorabilia for modern players aren't going to be worth sh*t in 50 years. The market is too saturated with the stuff. Memorabilia and signatures intended to be "collectible" won't appreciate in value.

 

Didn't Stanton just sign 200+ baseballs recently for some charity thing?

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Last year a friend gave me as a gift a Mike Stanton rookie card signed by Stanton, which I have in the safety deposit box in the bank.

 

Please tell me the Stanton card isn't the only thing you have in there.

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Autographs/memorabilia for modern players aren't going to be worth sh*t in 50 years. The market is too saturated with the stuff. Memorabilia and signatures intended to be "collectible" won't appreciate in value.

 

Didn't Stanton just sign 200+ baseballs recently for some charity thing?

 

 

I mean it'll be worth something, but like you said... it wont appreciate in value.

 

If it's worth $100 now... it'll be worth $100 in 50 years, as well. Such items wont get 'rarer' as they once did.

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Autographs/memorabilia for modern players aren't going to be worth sh*t in 50 years. The market is too saturated with the stuff. Memorabilia and signatures intended to be "collectible" won't appreciate in value.

 

Didn't Stanton just sign 200+ baseballs recently for some charity thing?

 

 

I mean it'll be worth something, but like you said... it wont appreciate in value.

 

If it's worth $100 now... it'll be worth $100 in 50 years, as well. Such items wont get 'rarer' as they once did.

It might depreciate in value, even. The market has really crashed for autographed stuff. Excluding very rare deceased players/HOFers, most of the stuff that was valuable just a few years ago has taken a major dive.

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Last year a friend gave me as a gift a Mike Stanton rookie card signed by Stanton, which I have in the safety deposit box in the bank.

 

Please tell me the Stanton card isn't the only thing you have in there.

 

No, I also have copies of important documents such as my will and advanced health care directive form, stock certificates, government bonds, and a few graded ancient Greek and Roman coins from when I used to collect coins.

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Autographs/memorabilia for modern players aren't going to be worth sh*t in 50 years. The market is too saturated with the stuff. Memorabilia and signatures intended to be "collectible" won't appreciate in value.

 

Didn't Stanton just sign 200+ baseballs recently for some charity thing?

 

 

I mean it'll be worth something, but like you said... it wont appreciate in value.

 

If it's worth $100 now... it'll be worth $100 in 50 years, as well. Such items wont get 'rarer' as they once did.

 

It's not like it takes a lot of space, plus even if it is not worth a lot, I'm sure my kids or someone else will appreciate it...so no harm in keeping it in there.

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As surprising as this may sound, it really depends on the quality of the autograph as well. Pull that sucker out of the deposit box long enough for a photo so we can see it.

 

If it's signed "Mike" eventually it will be worth a little bit more then a Giancarlo autograph since it's considered a "Early" autograph.

 

For example, heres Mike Piazza's Rookie Signature.

 

 

Here's his later years, say 1999 to 2005 when he was getting hounded for autographs, notice the sloppyness-

 

 

and heres a current one- from a signing in january

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Autographs/memorabilia for modern players aren't going to be worth sh*t in 50 years. The market is too saturated with the stuff. Memorabilia and signatures intended to be "collectible" won't appreciate in value.

 

Didn't Stanton just sign 200+ baseballs recently for some charity thing?

 

 

I mean it'll be worth something, but like you said... it wont appreciate in value.

 

If it's worth $100 now... it'll be worth $100 in 50 years, as well. Such items wont get 'rarer' as they once did.

 

It's not like it takes a lot of space, plus even if it is not worth a lot, I'm sure my kids or someone else will appreciate it...so no harm in keeping it in there.

 

Oh absolutely. No problem with it at all.

 

I along with others were just advising against saving it for making money. I save stuff like that all the time. Hell, I save concert tickets. Sometimes have them autographed. They're memories.

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