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Roof Leaks


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Manny Navarro (Miami Herald Sports Writer):

 

Apparently they had leaks even before the season started...

 

Is #Marlins Park's retractable roof leaking? Team president David Samson says 'Yes, but it's supposed to.' "Yesterday there were four of five spots where we had some drips coming down. The roof people along with Hunt-Moss were looking at those joints. Again, very normal. We went in to tell [Diamondbacks manager] Kirk Gibson about it and he said 'Hey, it's going to happen.' It's going to happen. He's used to it from the retractable roof in Arizona. So, that was fully expected...

 

More Samson on #Marlins Park retractable roof leaks: "But you need it to rain and see where [the leaks are]. There have been different type of rains the last few days. Back in the exhibition games there were leaks in the roof track in [section] 321. Today, it wasn't there. Sunday in right field, there drips in Section 1 and 2 and 201. But I looked during the game today when it was pouring and I did not see it dripping."

 

So how do they fix these leaks at #Marlins Park? "They open it up [the roof panel], take a look at the joint and they go and I guess put gum on it, something to seal it," team president David Samson said.

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"$2 billion"?? He must be thinking of Yankee Stadium.

 

What he's doing, as is often done by anyone who wants to take a cheap shot at the Marlins, is counting 30 to 40 years of bond interest on the M-D County debt issues.

 

I would only point out that not only 100% of the principal, but also 100% of the interest will be paid by hotel bed taxes, and almost exclusively by tourists.

 

Funny how, when people like that talk about, say, the leaking roof in their brand-new 100K house, they don't make any reference to the 300 to 400K of principal and interest they'll pay on their 30 year mortgage.

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"$2 billion"?? He must be thinking of Yankee Stadium.

 

What he's doing, as is often done by anyone who wants to take a cheap shot at the Marlins, is counting 30 to 40 years of bond interest on the M-D County debt issues.

 

I would only point out that not only 100% of the principal, but also 100% of the interest will be paid by hotel bed taxes, and almost exclusively by tourists.

 

Funny how, when people like that talk about, say, the leaking roof in their brand-new 100K house, they don't make any reference to the 300 to 400K of principal and interest they'll pay on their 30 year mortgage.

The time-value of money isn't important when we can rip the Miami Marlins. Silly ...!

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We should send Heath Bell up when it's raining to look for leaks then lie over the hole.

 

 

Maybe he will actually fix them? Unlike getting saves for the team.

 

This team sucks so far. But still should finish over .500 and still playoff team. Bell, Reyes, BP, team will gel in May or June and go on tear.

 

Also...LoMo + Petersen time. Ooooooh yeeeea. BFF's.

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If only it was so simple. The "hole" is one or more small gaps (a half-inch would suffice) in the seal of the white membrane covering to the hunk of white membrane covering adjacent to it. Thousands of gallons of water running down the roof can generate a real good drip through a joint imperfection.

 

Unfortunately, as the general contractor you can't order up a heavy rainstorm to test your work.

 

Every new retractable-roof stadium has had leaks which were easily fixed. This will probably be an ongoing minor maintenance problem as the sun and weather take their steady toll on the membrane-joint seals over the years.

 

Meanwhile, that may be the best use of Bell.

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If only it was so simple. The "hole" is one or more small gaps (a half-inch would suffice) in the seal of the white membrane covering to the hunk of white membrane covering adjacent to it. Thousands of gallons of water running down the roof can generate a real good drip through a joint imperfection.

 

Unfortunately, as the general contractor you can't order up a heavy rainstorm to test your work.

 

Every new retractable-roof stadium has had leaks which were easily fixed. This will probably be an ongoing minor maintenance problem as the sun and weather take their steady toll on the membrane-joint seals over the years.

 

Meanwhile, that may be the best use of Bell.

 

I wonder how they arrange the transaction regarding who gets the depreciation and maintenance cost deductions. You'd have to think they made it so the Marlins would get them, but I'm curious how they did so (maybe they only get an allocated share or something).

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If only it was so simple. The "hole" is one or more small gaps (a half-inch would suffice) in the seal of the white membrane covering to the hunk of white membrane covering adjacent to it. Thousands of gallons of water running down the roof can generate a real good drip through a joint imperfection.

 

Unfortunately, as the general contractor you can't order up a heavy rainstorm to test your work.

 

Every new retractable-roof stadium has had leaks which were easily fixed. This will probably be an ongoing minor maintenance problem as the sun and weather take their steady toll on the membrane-joint seals over the years.

 

Meanwhile, that may be the best use of Bell.

 

 

They do it in movies all the time.

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I wonder how they arrange the transaction regarding who gets the depreciation and maintenance cost deductions. You'd have to think they made it so the Marlins would get them, but I'm curious how they did so (maybe they only get an allocated share or something).

 

 

As I recall, the contract calls for the Marlins (through whatever entity they set up for the purpose) to operate the joint. To include all maintenance, whether it's picking up the fan trash or fixing roof leaks or whatever.

 

Marlins entity pays the bill, Marlins entity gets the deduction. No way they get any depreciation on anything, they don't own it. M-D County owns it, but they don't care about depreciation, they're not a taxable entity.

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I wonder how they arrange the transaction regarding who gets the depreciation and maintenance cost deductions. You'd have to think they made it so the Marlins would get them, but I'm curious how they did so (maybe they only get an allocated share or something).

 

 

As I recall, the contract calls for the Marlins (through whatever entity they set up for the purpose) to operate the joint. To include all maintenance, whether it's picking up the fan trash or fixing roof leaks or whatever.

 

Marlins entity pays the bill, Marlins entity gets the deduction. No way they get any depreciation on anything, they don't own it. M-D County owns it, but they don't care about depreciation, they're not a taxable entity.

That makes sense. I know M-D doesn't care about the taxes, but you're not saying the Marlins are exempt, right? AFAIK/IIRC that's only the NCAA, I thought.

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Another issue: The grass in RF is turning brown.

 

With the team hitting the road Tuesday for nine games in San Francisco, San Diego and Houston, the grounds crew at Marlins Park is first going to turn its attention to the grass in the outfield — particularly right field — that is turning brown.

 

“I would say the sod had as difficult an April as the team did,� Samson said.

 

Samson said showers in April caused the retractable roof at Marlins Park to be closed more often than they expected. The lack of sun has led to the decay of the grass.

 

The Marlins have already replaced the turf in right field once — before opening night. Samson said there’s always a chance they might have to replace the sod entirely. He said it has happened at other ballparks with retractable roofs.

 

During the Marlins’ trip, the grounds crew will use sun lamps “like the ones you see at nurseries,� Samson said, to help the grass grow. Samson said the Marlins remain confident natural grass can be successful in the ballpark, even though the roof will be closed for most games.

 

 

http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/05/01/2777691/miami-marlins-working-to-plug.html

 

 

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/05/01/2777691/miami-marlins-working-to-plug.html#storylink=cpy

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From the TV it seems like the grass in deep RF is especially brown. The photos seem to indicate that this portion of the field receives less direct sunlight.

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