Jump to content


Deal is not done


The "real" FAN
 Share

Recommended Posts

Beckett, Lowell will likely be traded to Boston

 

By Joe Capozzi

 

Palm Beach Post Staff Writer

 

Tuesday, November 22, 2005

 

Pitcher Josh Beckett and third baseman Mike Lowell appeared to be headed to Boston after the Marlins on Monday rejected the offer they had sought from the Texas Rangers.

 

The Red Sox and Marlins were close Monday night on a proposal that would send Beckett and Lowell to Boston for highly regarded minor-league shortstop Hanley Ramirez and a top pitching prospect.The hold-up was deciding on the pitcher. The Marlins want left-hander Jon Lester, but the Red Sox offered right-hander Anibel Sanchez.

 

Ramirez would replace free agent Alex Gonzalez, Florida's regular shortstop since 1999.

 

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram and ESPN reported Monday night that the teams had agreed to a deal as long as the players involved passed physicals. But a Marlins source said the trade was still being discussed, with more work to be done.

 

Beckett's agent, Michael Moye, said Monday night that he had not been contacted by the Marlins.

 

Beckett said he was finishing a round of golf in Texas when former Marlins teammate Carl Pavano of the New York Yankees called to tell him that ESPN reported news of the trade.

 

"Nobody official has called me to say it's done,'' Beckett said Monday night.

 

Asked about the prospect of pitching for the Red Sox, he replied: "I think that's what every player in baseball wants to do, to be on a

 

winning team. Winning solves everything. I'll be happy wherever I go. It's a change. Maybe that's what I need.''

 

The deal potentially could save the Marlins $13 million next season ? Lowell is owed $9 million and Beckett could make at least $4 million in arbitration.

 

If Beckett and Lowell are dealt, they might be followed by several teammates, including first baseman Carlos Delgado, catcher Paul Lo Duca, second baseman Luis Castillo and center fielder Juan Pierre.

 

Baseball sources said that Marlins President David Samson, frustrated over the team's inability to get a new ballpark, has ordered drastic cuts that could drop Florida's payroll next year to $40 million. It was a club-record $65 million in 2005.

 

It was not clear Monday night why Florida rejected Texas' proposal, which had been brokered in large part by Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria and Rangers owner Tom Hicks.

 

Earlier in the day, the Rangers told the Marlins they would trade third baseman Hank Blalock and a top pitching prospect ? either Thomas Diamond or John Danks. The Rangers had resisted including either prospect in the deal but changed their minds late Sunday after the Marlins demanded one of them as a condition for keeping the deal alive.

 

Rangers officials succumbed and told Florida they wanted an answer by Monday night to discourage the Marlins from shopping the Texas offer to other teams. But around 5 p.m. Monday, the Marlins told the Rangers they had decided to "go in another direction,'' Texas General Manager Jon Daniels said.

 

"In the end, a deal wasn't there,'' Daniels told Texas reporters in a conference call Monday night.

 

The Rangers were surprised by Florida's change of heart, but The Palm Beach Post reported Monday that the Marlins were considering at least one other offer that the team found more appealing.

 

The Red Sox's offer might have been more attractive because Florida wouldn't be getting any expensive contracts but would be adding a starting position player and a young, quality pitcher.

 

Ramirez, 22, who made his major league debut Sept. 20 and played two games, hit .271 with six home runs and 52 RBI in 122 games for Class AA Portland.

 

Sanchez, 21, went 6-1 with a 2.40 ERA in 14 starts for Class A Wilmington and then went 3-5 with a 3.45 ERA in 11 starts for Portland.

 

Lester, 21, was 11-6 with a 2.61 ERA in 26 starts for Portland.

 

Obtaining Blalock would have given the Marlins a couple of challenges and they probably would have had to trade him again.

 

He is owed $3 million in 2006, $4.75 million in 2007 and $5.95 million in 2008 ? money that the Marlins would find difficult to pay as the team prepares to slash its payroll.

 

The Marlins also want to leave Miguel Cabrera in place at third base; he does not want to return to the outfield.

 

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/marlins/conte..._feed_1122.html

by the way I think Joe deserves credit for breaking this story from the begining, it appears the Marlins are holding out for Lester

Link to comment
Share on other sites


I sure hope we hold out for Lester cause we cause Beinfest could have gotten Sanchez for Burnett last yera and blew it but realistically from everything im hearing the deal is done. Its highly unlikely the Marlins walk away from this offer if the Red Sox don't part with Lester even though its what they should do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sox make deal for Beckett

By Tony Massarotti

Tuesday, November 22, 2005

 

Nearly two years after acquiring Curt Schilling from the Arizona Diamondbacks, the Red Sox are on the verge of getting another overpowering right-hander to bolster their starting rotation.

And this one is just 25.

According to baseball sources, the Sox and Florida Marlins have agreed in principle on a deal that would bring Josh Beckett and third baseman Mike Lowell to Boston for prized shortstop prospect Hanley Ramirez and minor league right-handers Anibal Sanchez and Jesus Delgado. Sources indicated there still are some details to address, primarily concerning the health of centerpiece Beckett. Beckett, who has never made more than 29 starts or pitched more than 178 innings in a season, had his shoulder examined by renowned orthopedist James Andrews after this season. Andrews gave Beckett a clean bill of health, but the Red Sox undoubtedly would prefer to examine Beckett themselves before finalizing a trade that would send Ramirez and Sanchez ? two of their top prospects ? to the Marlins.

Entering yesterday?s talks, the Sox and Texas Rangers were considered the primary bidders for Beckett, who undoubtedly will be the best pitcher to change teams this offseason. There was some indication that other teams had entered the bidding, but at least one of them, the Los Angeles Dodgers, was told by the Marlins that discussions with either the Sox or Rangers had advanced considerably.

Late yesterday, the Rangers held a teleconference to announce they no longer were a candidate to acquire Beckett.

The deal for Beckett would be an enormous coup for the Sox for an assortment of reasons. Despite operating without a general manager in the wake of Theo Epstein?s departure, the Sox will have acquired a pitcher who could be their ace for years to come. They also will have managed to complete the trade without giving up left-hander Jon Lester, whom the Sox steadfastly refused to part with and whom some club officials regard as a better prospect than Jonathan Papelbon. Becket, who earned $2.4 million this year, is eligible for salary arbitration this year and next. He is not eligible for free agency until after the 2007 season, leaving the Sox ample time to secure him to a long-term contract. Beckett was 15-8 with a 3.38 ERA and 166 strikeouts in 178 innings this year. The 2003 World Series MVP is 41-34 with a 3.46 ERA in his regular-season career and 2-2 with a 2.11 ERA in six postseason appearances. He has 607 strikeouts in 609 regular-season innings.

Lowell is due $9 million in 2006 and ?07 following a disappointing season in which he batted just .236 with eight home runs and 58 RBI. In many ways, Lowell was the key to the trade because the Marlins wanted to shed his $18 million for the two years. Marlins officials have planned to use their savings on Lowell to sign left-hander Dontrelle Willis and young star Miguel Cabrera ? who would return to third base from the outfield with Lowell gone ? but the only way they could trade him was to package him with Beckett.

Lowell is a risk, but Still, the gamble could be a good one for the Sox, who are in a need of a third baseman given Bill Mueller?s status as a free agent. Lowell is an excellent fielder who won his first Gold Glove at third base this season. In the Red Sox lineup ? assuming the club keeps Manny Ramirez ? the demands on him would be relatively minimal.

If and when the Sox complete the deal for Beckett and Lowell, the announcement will come as the club approaches the two-year anniversary of the Schilling deal. That trade, which was finalized on Nov. 28, 2003, was a key maneuver in deliveri

 

http://redsox.bostonherald.com/redSox/view...&format=&page=2

 

Boston is saying its Josh's health and it appear Jesus Delgado is the PTNL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Marlins officials have planned to use their savings on Lowell to sign left-hander Dontrelle Willis and young star Miguel Cabrera ? who would return to third base from the outfield with Lowell gone ? but the only way they could trade him was to package him with Beckett.

:lol :lol :lol :lol :lol !!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sox closing in on Beckett

 

By Chris Snow, Globe Staff | November 21, 2005

 

With Theo Epstein off quietly living his life, and the general manager search reaching periodic points of inertia, the Red Sox are on the verge of acquiring Marlins pitcher Josh Beckett, a momentous move that would position the club with an ace around which to build its pitching staff for perhaps a decade to come.Pending physicals, the 25-year-old Beckett, MVP of the 2003 World Series, will come to Boston along with 2005 Gold Glove-winning third baseman Mike Lowell and the entire balance of Lowell's cumbersome contract, according to two major league sources. The Sox, the sources indicated, will send to Florida two of the organization's top prospects, Double A shortstop Hanley Ram?rez and Double A righthander Anibal S?nchez, as well as another lesser prospect, Single A pitcher Jesus Delgado. The sources indicated that no money is changing hands in the deal.

 

Baseball America is expected to rank Ram?rez the Sox' third-best prospect (he was No. 1 a year ago), S?nchez fourth, and Delgado 18th.

 

Sox president/CEO Admin Lucchino refused comment last night.

 

The deal would represent somewhat of a coup for the Red Sox, since the Texas Rangers, by all indications, were in closest pursuit of Beckett over the last few days, reportedly offering up economical and productive third baseman Hank Blalock (under contract for a total of $13.7 million over the next three seasons) and one of the organization's top two pitching prospects, John Danks or Thomas Diamond. But Texas GM Jon Daniels reportedly received a call yesterday afternoon informing him that the Marlins would be going another route.

 

Beckett, who will turn 26 in May, went 15-8 with a 3.38 ERA in 29 starts in 2005, and in 103 career starts over four-plus seasons, he is 41-34 with a 3.46 ERA, all with Florida, the team that drafted him second overall in 1999.

 

Beckett rocketed to prominence during the 2003 postseason, when as a 23-year-old he pitched complete-game shutouts in Game 5 of the NLCS vs. the Cubs and in a clinching Game 6 of the World Series vs. the Yankees, the latter appearance on three days' rest. Beckett also pitched four innings in relief in Game 7 of the 2003 NLCS, allowing one run just three days after his Game 5 start.

 

Beckett stands to become the Sox' most significant trade for a young, cornerstone-caliber player since the club acquired Pedro Mart?nez eight years ago.

 

And while Beckett has dealt with injury issues -- predominantly blisters, and this year an oblique strain that landed him on the disabled list -- he was made available by Florida early in the offseason not because his future is uncertain but because the team's is. Florida will not re-sign pitcher A.J. Burnett, and is looking to deal Carlos Delgado, among others, in an unloading of talent aimed to drastically reduce payroll.But to land Beckett, the Sox will have to take on Lowell, who is guaranteed $9 million each of the next two seasons and hit just .236 with 8 homers and 58 RBIs in 150 games last season after averaging 25 homers and 95 RBIs for five seasons. Other than nine games at second base in 2005, Lowell, an All-Star in 2002, '03, and '04, has played his eight-year career at third base, where he's evolved into one of the game's best gloves at the position.Lowell, a .272 career hitter who turns 32 in February, made only six errors in 135 games at third this year, the lowest error total ever by an NL third baseman who appeared in 135 games. He also posted the lowest average ever for an NL Gold Glove winner at third base. His addition to the Sox would leave in question where Kevin Youkilis fits in 2006 and all but guarantee that Bill Mueller has played his last game with Boston.

 

Initial reports yesterday had the Sox dealing either Sanchez or Double A lefty Jon Lester to Florida, though Lester, who led Double A in ERA and strikeouts last season, was never offered up. Instead, Florida was offered, and accepted, Sanchez, whom one high-ranking Sox executive projected this season as a middle-of-the-rotation pitcher when major league-ready, and the Sox didn't expect that to be until approximately 2007.

 

Sanchez, a compact strikeout pitcher, has made only 40 professional starts (15 in short-season Lowell, 14 with Single A Wilmington, and 11 with Double A Portland) but has fanned 259 while walking only 66. He has only 11 starts above Single A, and went 3-5 with a 3.45 ERA this year in his Double A baptism, though he did whiff 63 and walk only 16 in 57 1/3 innings with the Sea Dogs.

 

Beckett, who made $2.4 million last season, is expected to receive a raise, to the $4 million-$5 million neighborhood, through arbitration, and won't become a free agent until after the 2007 season. It's possible, of course, that the club signs him to a long-term deal.

 

A 6-foot-5-inch native of Spring, Texas, Beckett broke into the majors in 2001 at age 21, at the time the fourth-youngest player in the league. In six postseason appearances in 2003, all but one as a starter, Beckett went 2-2 with a 2.11 ERA, striking out 47 and walking only 12 in 42 2/3 innings.

 

In 2005 with the Marlins, he ranked seventh in the NL in hits per nine innings (7.71), eighth in winning percentage (.652), and ninth in batting average against (.234) and strikeouts per nine innings (8.36). In 179 2/3 innings, he allowed 153 hits, struck out 166, and walked 58.

 

Lowell, meanwhile, posted his most balanced offensive seasons in 2003 and 2004, hitting .276 and .293, respectively, with combined totals of 71 doubles, 59 homers, and 193 RBIs. But he struggled last season. He experienced vision problems, at one point experimenting with one contact lens, in his left eye.

 

http://www.boston.com/sports/baseball/reds...beckett/?page=2

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Marlins' Beckett, Lowell going to Boston

 

By Juan C. Rodriguez

Staff Writer

Posted November 22 2005

 

The Florida Marlins are set to rid themselves of third baseman Mike Lowell, but they'll lose a World Series hero in the process.

 

Pending player physicals, the Marlins and Red Sox Monday consummated a five-player deal that will send Lowell -- and the remaining $18 million of his contract -- and right-hander Josh Beckett to Boston. In return, the Marlins will receive two of the Red Sox's top four prospects in shortstop Hanley Ramirez and right-hander Anibal Sanchez. The Red Sox also added a third player, Class-A right-hander Jesus Delgado.

 

Though the Marlins lopped off roughly $13 million from next season's payroll, they're not done trimming. The market for first baseman Carlos Delgado has started simmering. Delgado, who is owned $48 million over the final three years of the deal he signed last offseason, likely is the next departure.

 

"[The Marlins] have some teams ready to go on him," said a National League front office man that has spoken with the Marlins, adding they already have some offers on the table.

 

In addition to the Mets and Orioles, both the Los Angeles Angels and Dodgers are believed to be in the mix.

 

Dumping Delgado's entire contract, which calls for a $13.5 million outlay next season, doesn't guarantee the Marlins will keep some of their higher priced talent. That group includes Luis Castillo, Juan Pierre and Paul Lo Duca, who combined will make approximately $17.25 million in 2006.

 

The Marlins aren't telling teams any of those guys are off limits and indications are all could be dealt.

 

"Next year I think they're going to go with a nucleus of three or four guys, lower-end salary guys, and kind of start from scratch," said one American League executive. "Last year at least they tried to put a good team together, which I thought they did. This year they're just dumping payroll. Their entire infield is up for grabs for sure."

 

Monday afternoon the Marlins informed the Rangers they were no longer in the Beckett sweepstakes. The Rangers, who were dangling two-time All-Star Hank Blalock and one of two minor league pitchers who were former first-round draft picks, the Marlins had off-field concerns about Blalock.

 

The piece they had to have from Boston was Ramirez. The two sides began discussing a possible deal during the general managers' meetings.

 

A major-league ready shortstop, Ramirez would have been rated the organization's third-best prospect by Baseball America. He fills an immediate need for the Marlins, who will lose Alex Gonzalez to free agency and have determined Robert Andino isn't ready to for the big-league job.

 

The free agent signing of former Marlin Edgar Renteria to a four-year, $40 million contract last offseason all but blocked Ramirez's path to Fenway. In Ramirez, the Marlins hope to have a more athletic version of Renteria in the making.

 

A 6-3, 195-pound product of Samana, Dominican Republic, Ramirez is a spectacular defensive shortstop with outstanding range. Offensively, he drives the ball to all fields and projects to be a .300 hitter with plenty of speed.

 

Last season he hit .271 with six homers and 52 RBI in 122 games for Double-A Portland. He made his major-league debut in September, appearing in two games and going hitless in two at-bats.

 

Ramirez, who turns 22 next month, was named the Red Sox's top prospect in both 2004 and 2005 by Baseball America.

 

The Marlins accepted Sanchez instead of left-hander Jon Lester, who the Red Sox balked at trading. The Red Sox would neither discuss Craig Hansen, who the Marlins talked about drafting and promoting straight to the majors from St. John's last June. Because Hansen would not have been trade?eligible until a year after his July signing date.

 

Operating without a general manager, the Red Sox appeased the Marlins adding a third player in Jesus Delgado. The Marlins dealt mostly with special assistant Bill Lajoie and player development director Jed Hoyer.

 

The 6-0, 180-pound Sanchez and Delgado both are products of Maracay, Venezuela as is Miguel Cabrera, who next season will replace Lowell as the Marlins' full-time third baseman.

 

A Tommy John surgery survivor, Sanchez missed all of the 2003 season recovering. He returned in 2004 and was tabbed the Pitch of the Year at short-season Class A Lowell, where he went 3-4 with a 1.77 ERA, 29 walks and a league-best 101 strikeouts in 15 starts (76 1/3 innings).

 

He split last season between Class A Wilmington and Portland, going a combined 9-6 with 40 walks, 158 strikeouts, and a 2.85 ERA in 136 innings.

 

Like Sanchez, Delgado also underwent Tommy John surgery and missed all of the 2002 and '03 seasons as a result. After spotty results in 2004, Delgado put together better numbers last season, striking out 69 in a combined 72 innings for Class A Greenville.

 

The second overall pick in the 1999 draft, Beckett has been a regular on the disabled list the last three seasons. When healthy, he is considered among the game's elite pitchers.

 

A product of Coral Gables High School and Florida International University, Lowell was acquired from the Yankees in 1999. He became of the team's most consistent run producers before going into an inexplicable season-and-a-half long tailspin.

 

 

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/basebal...-sports-marlins

 

here's hoping for the Dodgers offer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Marlins' Beckett, Lowell going to Boston

 

By Juan C. Rodriguez

Staff Writer

Posted November 22 2005

 

The Florida Marlins are set to rid themselves of third baseman Mike Lowell, but they'll lose a World Series hero in the process.

 

Pending player physicals, the Marlins and Red Sox Monday consummated a five-player deal that will send Lowell -- and the remaining $18 million of his contract -- and right-hander Josh Beckett to Boston. In return, the Marlins will receive two of the Red Sox's top four prospects in shortstop Hanley Ramirez and right-hander Anibal Sanchez. The Red Sox also added a third player, Class-A right-hander Jesus Delgado.

 

Though the Marlins lopped off roughly $13 million from next season's payroll, they're not done trimming. The market for first baseman Carlos Delgado has started simmering. Delgado, who is owned $48 million over the final three years of the deal he signed last offseason, likely is the next departure.

 

"[The Marlins] have some teams ready to go on him," said a National League front office man that has spoken with the Marlins, adding they already have some offers on the table.

 

In addition to the Mets and Orioles, both the Los Angeles Angels and Dodgers are believed to be in the mix.

 

Dumping Delgado's entire contract, which calls for a $13.5 million outlay next season, doesn't guarantee the Marlins will keep some of their higher priced talent. That group includes Luis Castillo, Juan Pierre and Paul Lo Duca, who combined will make approximately $17.25 million in 2006.

 

The Marlins aren't telling teams any of those guys are off limits and indications are all could be dealt.

 

"Next year I think they're going to go with a nucleus of three or four guys, lower-end salary guys, and kind of start from scratch," said one American League executive. "Last year at least they tried to put a good team together, which I thought they did. This year they're just dumping payroll. Their entire infield is up for grabs for sure."

 

Monday afternoon the Marlins informed the Rangers they were no longer in the Beckett sweepstakes. The Rangers, who were dangling two-time All-Star Hank Blalock and one of two minor league pitchers who were former first-round draft picks, the Marlins had off-field concerns about Blalock.

 

The piece they had to have from Boston was Ramirez. The two sides began discussing a possible deal during the general managers' meetings.

 

A major-league ready shortstop, Ramirez would have been rated the organization's third-best prospect by Baseball America. He fills an immediate need for the Marlins, who will lose Alex Gonzalez to free agency and have determined Robert Andino isn't ready to for the big-league job.

 

The free agent signing of former Marlin Edgar Renteria to a four-year, $40 million contract last offseason all but blocked Ramirez's path to Fenway. In Ramirez, the Marlins hope to have a more athletic version of Renteria in the making.

 

A 6-3, 195-pound product of Samana, Dominican Republic, Ramirez is a spectacular defensive shortstop with outstanding range. Offensively, he drives the ball to all fields and projects to be a .300 hitter with plenty of speed.

 

Last season he hit .271 with six homers and 52 RBI in 122 games for Double-A Portland. He made his major-league debut in September, appearing in two games and going hitless in two at-bats.

 

Ramirez, who turns 22 next month, was named the Red Sox's top prospect in both 2004 and 2005 by Baseball America.

 

The Marlins accepted Sanchez instead of left-hander Jon Lester, who the Red Sox balked at trading. The Red Sox would neither discuss Craig Hansen, who the Marlins talked about drafting and promoting straight to the majors from St. John's last June. Because Hansen would not have been trade?eligible until a year after his July signing date.

 

Operating without a general manager, the Red Sox appeased the Marlins adding a third player in Jesus Delgado. The Marlins dealt mostly with special assistant Bill Lajoie and player development director Jed Hoyer.

 

The 6-0, 180-pound Sanchez and Delgado both are products of Maracay, Venezuela as is Miguel Cabrera, who next season will replace Lowell as the Marlins' full-time third baseman.

 

A Tommy John surgery survivor, Sanchez missed all of the 2003 season recovering. He returned in 2004 and was tabbed the Pitch of the Year at short-season Class A Lowell, where he went 3-4 with a 1.77 ERA, 29 walks and a league-best 101 strikeouts in 15 starts (76 1/3 innings).

 

He split last season between Class A Wilmington and Portland, going a combined 9-6 with 40 walks, 158 strikeouts, and a 2.85 ERA in 136 innings.

 

Like Sanchez, Delgado also underwent Tommy John surgery and missed all of the 2002 and '03 seasons as a result. After spotty results in 2004, Delgado put together better numbers last season, striking out 69 in a combined 72 innings for Class A Greenville.

 

The second overall pick in the 1999 draft, Beckett has been a regular on the disabled list the last three seasons. When healthy, he is considered among the game's elite pitchers.

 

A product of Coral Gables High School and Florida International University, Lowell was acquired from the Yankees in 1999. He became of the team's most consistent run producers before going into an inexplicable season-and-a-half long tailspin.

 

 

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/sports/basebal...-sports-marlins

 

here's hoping for the Dodgers offer

 

I'm intrigued by what the Angels could offer for Delgado...they have nice young prospects...McPherson, Morales, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Marlins refuse Rangers' offer

 

Rangers offer Blalock, Danks but Beckett goes to Red Sox rangers

 

By T.R. SULLIVAN

 

Star-Telegram Staff WriteR

 

ARLINGTON -- The Rangers' pursuit of Florida Marlins pitcher Josh Beckett came to an unsuccessful conclusion Monday.

 

The Rangers were informed by the Marlins that their offer of third baseman Hank Blalock and minor league pitcher John Danks was not going to be good enough to get Beckett and third baseman Mike Lowell.

 

Beckett and Lowell are believed to be headed to the Boston Red Sox for minor league shortstop Hanley Ramirez, pitcher Anibal Sanchez and another minor league prospect.

 

"I'm disappointed," Rangers owner Tom Hicks said. "To get a pitcher of the caliber of Josh Beckett doesn't happen very often. Plus he's a Texan and would have been a long-term fit for our club. We just didn't get it done.

 

"But I'm very happy with our staff, taking the aggressive position that they did creating this opportunity."

 

The Marlins made it clear that they wanted Blalock and either Danks or Diamond for Beckett and Lowell. The Rangers finally agreed on Sunday but the Marlins were already looking for a better deal.

 

"I don't think there was ever a time where we could have pushed a button and made this happen," Rangers general manager Jon Daniels said. "The Marlins were trying to get maximum value for the player. I knew other clubs were going to get involved."

 

One source said Ramirez was ultimately the player Marlins general manager Admin Beinfest wanted in a deal for Beckett. But an executive with another American League team said, "The Rangers deal is better than that. The Marlins must not be able to take on any money."

 

The Rangers will now most likely turn their attention to free agent pitchers Matt Morris and Paul Byrd. They have expressed serious interest in both.

 

The Rangers aren't planning on pursuing A.J. Burnett because he is looking for a five-year contract.

 

"I expect we'll get more aggressive on free agents," Daniels said.

 

Daniels also stressed that this was a unique opportunity to get a potential No. 1 starter and the Rangers aren't trying to trade Blalock. The Tampa Bay Devil Rays, Minnesota Twins and the Philadelphia Phillies might have interest in Blalock.

 

But the Marlins were also giving up a third baseman in return. The Rangers don't have anybody behind Blalock.

 

"I don't have any intention of moving Hank Blalock," Daniels said. "I never did. I was never shopping him to any clubs.

 

"He's an original Ranger who came up through our system and signed a multi-year deal with us. He stands for a lot of the things we want to be about. This was one of the most difficult parts of the decision-making process but to get value you have to give up value in return."

 

Daniels continues to have trade discussions with other clubs but said he wasn't close on anything. Other teams have expressed interest in second baseman Alfonso Soriano, catcher Gerald Laird, first baseman Adrian Gonzalez and outfielders Kevin Mench and Laynce Nix.

 

The Rangers could get calls from other clubs about Blalock now that they've shown at least a willingness to include him in a trade.

 

But Daniels said, "I'm not making any calls to trade Hank Blalock."

 

The Rangers' goal was to get a No. 1 pitcher and they believed Beckett could have filled that role after going 15-8 with a 3.37 ERA last season.

 

That's why the Rangers were willing to give up Blalock and Danks and take on the $18 million that Lowell is owed over the next two seasons.

 

"Tom Hicks really stepped up," Daniels said. "This had a potentially big financial impact and he never blinked. He was willing to take on significant dollars. We had the green light. Ultimately it wasn't to be.

 

"We wanted to acquire a front-line starting pitcher. That was our top priority. It still is."

 

It appears some feel the Texas offer was better than the Red Sox offer

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sox seem in line

for Beckett

 

BY BILL MADDEN and ANTHONY McCARRON

DAILY NEWS SPORTS WRITERS

 

Josh Beckett likely will be bringing fastball to Fenway, meaning Yanks can expect more of what they saw in 2003 Series.

The pitcher who burned the Yankees in the 2003 World Series appears close to going to their biggest rival as the Red Sox last night neared a deal for hard-throwing righty Josh Beckett of the Florida Marlins.

 

Two baseball officials said the Sox would be the first beneficiaries of the latest Florida fire sale, swapping two of their best prospects and perhaps another minor-leaguer for Beckett, who beat the Yankees in Game 6 of the '03 Fall Classic with a five-hit shutout that made the Marlins champs. The Red Sox, who were close to pulling off the deal despite not having a general manager since Theo Epstein bolted, also would have to take the contract of pricey third baseman Mike Lowell.

 

The Yankees apparently had a chance to bid for Beckett when the Marlins called them yesterday, according to three other baseball executives. But the Yanks did not want to part with Chien-Ming Wang or Robinson Cano, both of whom the Marlins asked for and the Yanks have vowed not to trade. At one point, Florida wanted Wang, Double-A infielder Eric Duncan and a third prospect, one official said.

 

The Yankees also did not want to absorb the $18 million owed Lowell over the next two years, the same official said. "They (the Marlins) called everybody, but you had to take Lowell and give up substantial prospects, too," the official said. "The Yankees can't take on $18 million and a player that doesn't fit (Lowell) when they're trying to cut some payroll and still have needs in center field and the bullpen.

 

"They (the Yankees) would've loved to be in this, but under those criteria, it doesn't make much sense."

 

The Marlins, who want to slash their payroll below $50 million, were prepared to expand the deal with the Yankees to include Luis Castillo and Juan Pierre for Wang, Cano, Duncan and another prospect, an executive said. But that would have meant the Yanks would have to take on additional payroll - Pierre and Castillo combined to make nearly $9 million last season.

 

Yanks GM Brian Cashman did not return a call seeking comment, but other baseball officials said the Yanks had concerns about Beckett's health. He has been on the disabled list seven times in the last four years, most often for blister problems.

 

But Beckett is only 25 - and six weeks younger than Wang - and he was 15-8 last year with a 3.38 ERA and is 41-34 with a 3.46 ERA in five major league seasons. His performance in the 2003 post-season proved he can pitch on big stages.

 

After talking seriously with the Rangers over the weekend about a trade for third baseman Hank Blalock and a pitching prospect, the Marlins called Texas officials yesterday and told them they preferred the Red Sox package, which includes shortstop Hanley Ramirez, Boston's top prospect, and righthander Anibel Sanchez. The teams were still negotiating over money and the third player last night.

 

Beckett will slot into a Red Sox rotation that includes Curt Schilling - another hurler with health questions - Matt Clement, Tim Wakefield and Bronson Arroyo. The Red Sox likely will trade David Wells this winter. Even though Lowell had a subpar season in 2005 with a .236 average, eight homers and 58 RBI, he was one of John Henry's favorite players when Henry owned the Marlins.

 

Lowell likely will be the Sox's third baseman, meaning free agent Bill Mueller won't be re-signed. Lowell's career could be salvaged in Boston because he's a righthanded pull hitter, one official said. "Yankee Stadium would've been the worst place for him to play," the official said.

 

Ramirez, who turns 22 in December, should win the Marlins' shortstop job, so Florida likely won't re-sign its own free agent, Alex Gonzalez. Ramirez hit .271 with six homers and 52 RBI for Boston's Double-A team last season and has a .302 career average in the minors.

 

Ramirez has been the most sought-after Red Sox prospect and last year was the sticking point in a three-way deal between Boston, the Mets and the Devil Rays that would've landed Manny Ramirez in New York. The Sox didn't want to part with Hanley Ramirez, who would've gone to Tampa, and the trade was scuttled.

 

Sanchez, 21, was 3-5 with a 3.45 ERA last year in Double-A and "is a real gem," said one talent evaluator who saw him regularly last season. "He's got great stuff but most of all he's got great location and that's what puts him a step above Boston's other pitching prospects," the scout said.

 

 

Interesting the Yankees said NO to Lowell a former Yankees prospect

 

http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/baseball...6p-313213c.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...