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The Gyroball


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http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/baseball/289...gyroball18.html

 

Here is an article stating the existence of the famed/mythical gyroball.

 

To me, the motion looks very similar to that of a leg break in cricket, which even I can bowl.

 

The pitch would surely be difficult to disguise given the wrist 'wrapping' around the ball as it is released.

 

Any thoughts??

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:mischief2 Who's farm system is he in anyway, or what team do you think he might sign with

 

 

He's playing over in Japan and is under contract over there for (I believe) 1 more season. Not completely sure about his contractual status though.

 

One has got to believe that if it comes down to guaranteed money, which inevitablly it will, he'll be wearing pinstripes.

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:mischief2 Who's farm system is he in anyway, or what team do you think he might sign with

 

 

He's playing over in Japan and is under contract over there for (I believe) 1 more season. Not completely sure about his contractual status though.

 

One has got to believe that if it comes down to guaranteed money, which inevitablly it will, he'll be wearing pinstripes.

Yea but many of the Japanese players like staying close to Japan like Ichiro, don't be surprised if he is with Seattle or even one of the two LA teams, but the yankees influence in Japan is pretty high.

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He sure is going to cash in.

ST. LOUIS -- Japanese pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka selected Scott Boras to represent him in negotiations with major league teams, the agent said Tuesday.

 

 

Matsuzaka's rights are expected to be "posted" by the Seibu Lions next month, meaning that all 30 Major League teams can bid on the 26-year-old right-hander. The team with the highest bid gains the right to attempt to sign the pitcher.

 

 

Matsuzaka was 17-5 with a 2.13 ERA and 200 strikeouts this year, and he impressed many major league scouts last March during the World Baseball Classic, where he was selected MVP as Japan won the title.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have a question regarding this Daisuke Matsuzaka guy and how good he really will be in the majors. Isnt' there alot of risk shelling out the kind of money this guy is demanding? Look at alot of the pitchers who have come to the majors and after a year or 2 were nothing compared to what they were when they were pitching in Asia. Does this guy really deserve top of the line money when he hasn't proven himself in the majors?

 

Once MLB hitters adjust to this guys style, doesn't this guy just turn into an ordinary pitcher? Or am I just not educated enough on Daisuke? Sorry for sounding ignorant but I was just reading how much money this guy is going to demand and it seems obsurd.

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I have a question regarding this Daisuke Matsuzaka guy and how good he really will be in the majors. Isnt' there alot of risk shelling out the kind of money this guy is demanding? Look at alot of the pitchers who have come to the majors and after a year or 2 were nothing compared to what they were when they were pitching in Asia. Does this guy really deserve top of the line money when he hasn't proven himself in the majors?

 

Once MLB hitters adjust to this guys style, doesn't this guy just turn into an ordinary pitcher? Or am I just not educated enough on Daisuke? Sorry for sounding ignorant but I was just reading how much money this guy is going to demand and it seems obsurd.

 

Short answer, maybe. Long answer, you're very very wrong.

 

Pitching's a big gamble, give me 5 "can't miss prospects" and I'll give you one good pitcher. However, Matsuzaka is an established talent from a league that has produced world class talent. He's not "projectable" he is what he is, and what he is is quite good to amazing.

 

I don't recall where I read this, but some stat head has developed a "comparable value" formula for people in the Japanese league and how it'd translate to MLB. Matsuzaka's line for MLB based on his performance last season was something like 16-9 3.15 ERA and about an 8.5 K/9.

 

In a league where free agent quality pitching is scarce, that kind of line is money in the bank.

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I have a question regarding this Daisuke Matsuzaka guy and how good he really will be in the majors. Isnt' there alot of risk shelling out the kind of money this guy is demanding? Look at alot of the pitchers who have come to the majors and after a year or 2 were nothing compared to what they were when they were pitching in Asia. Does this guy really deserve top of the line money when he hasn't proven himself in the majors?

 

Once MLB hitters adjust to this guys style, doesn't this guy just turn into an ordinary pitcher? Or am I just not educated enough on Daisuke? Sorry for sounding ignorant but I was just reading how much money this guy is going to demand and it seems obsurd.

 

Short answer, maybe. Long answer, you're very very wrong.

 

Pitching's a big gamble, give me 5 "can't miss prospects" and I'll give you one good pitcher. However, Matsuzaka is an established talent from a league that has produced world class talent. He's not "projectable" he is what he is, and what he is is quite good to amazing.

 

I don't recall where I read this, but some stat head has developed a "comparable value" formula for people in the Japanese league and how it'd translate to MLB. Matsuzaka's line for MLB based on his performance last season was something like 16-9 3.15 ERA and about an 8.5 K/9.

 

In a league where free agent quality pitching is scarce, that kind of line is money in the bank.

Hey thanks for taking the time to educate me a bit. So basically what you are saying is this is one of the best pitchers to come out of Japan ever? If that is the case I guess there is no risk involved. I guess I also didn't understand how the posting of a pitcher works. So he basically needs to be bid on AND then signed to a contract? So any team who needs his services would need to bid 30 mill and the sign a long term deal? Daaaaamn if so.

 

Thanks again for explaining it to me. :thumbup

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I have a question regarding this Daisuke Matsuzaka guy and how good he really will be in the majors. Isnt' there alot of risk shelling out the kind of money this guy is demanding? Look at alot of the pitchers who have come to the majors and after a year or 2 were nothing compared to what they were when they were pitching in Asia. Does this guy really deserve top of the line money when he hasn't proven himself in the majors?

 

Once MLB hitters adjust to this guys style, doesn't this guy just turn into an ordinary pitcher? Or am I just not educated enough on Daisuke? Sorry for sounding ignorant but I was just reading how much money this guy is going to demand and it seems obsurd.

 

Short answer, maybe. Long answer, you're very very wrong.

 

Pitching's a big gamble, give me 5 "can't miss prospects" and I'll give you one good pitcher. However, Matsuzaka is an established talent from a league that has produced world class talent. He's not "projectable" he is what he is, and what he is is quite good to amazing.

 

I don't recall where I read this, but some stat head has developed a "comparable value" formula for people in the Japanese league and how it'd translate to MLB. Matsuzaka's line for MLB based on his performance last season was something like 16-9 3.15 ERA and about an 8.5 K/9.

 

In a league where free agent quality pitching is scarce, that kind of line is money in the bank.

Hey thanks for taking the time to educate me a bit. So basically what you are saying is this is one of the best pitchers to come out of Japan ever? If that is the case I guess there is no risk involved. I guess I also didn't understand how the posting of a pitcher works. So he basically needs to be bid on AND then signed to a contract? So any team who needs his services would need to bid 30 mill and the sign a long term deal? Daaaaamn if so.

 

Thanks again for explaining it to me. :thumbup

 

Posting's buying the right to negotiate.

 

Teams submit a blind one time only bid to the commissioner's office. The commissioner's office then notifies the posting team of the highest bid without informing them of the team. I believe the posting team then has the right to accept the bid or take the posted player back.

 

After that, the player and the highest bidding team structure a contract. I'm not quite sure what happens if negotiations break down between team and player though, but then again, if you're just bidding 8 figures to negotiate with the guy, odds are you're not letting him get away.

 

It's highly likely that when all's said and done, Matsuzaka will have cost his signing team around $80-$90 million.

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