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Anyone have any clue what the movie is?? The trailer looks cool as hell.

 

I've been following this project pretty closely now because of the small chance it is Lost related. Right now though the leading theory is that it is a Cthulhu monster movie based on some of the ethanhaaswasright blogs that the studio owns.

 

Dude, if it is a Cthulu monster, that would be awesome. To those who don't know what that is, its an octopus looking creature of horrible evil created by H.P. Lovecraft. He's a horror master, and no, not a Freddy or Jason horror. I'm talking horror that sticks in your head and creeps you out. Cthulu is a creature that ruled the Earth in the times of the ancients, a race of people that have been extinct off the planet for thousands of years, supposedly living underground, waiting to come back and reclaim their Earth.

 

I highly recommend anything by Lovecraft. His stories are not long, but they are good. Real good.

 

This might be the first time i totally "nerded out" on this forum.

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  • 5 months later...

if they don't actually show too much of the creature, that helps with the realism.

 

 

I think you will get your wish. There are just way too many people who work on a film set to not have one single leak of what the monster actually is. I would bet good money that they never actually show the creature.

I don't know about that.

 

To me not showing the creature is 100 percent a marketing ploy and likely has little to do with realism. You mean to tell me something the size of a skyscraper (and based on the preview whatever the thing it is, it's huge) can't caught be on camera? The only way they could likely avoid this is by employing some ridiculous twist like making the creature invisible or something. Likely the "realism" effect they are shooting for is going to be represented through the handheld camera, which is something that has been under fire by critics as of late. Other than that I don't see how this is going to be different than all of the movies that came before it (CG effect films with NYC taking a beating).

 

 

 

I never said anything about realism, so don't quote me on that. It will not be a realistic film, what I think will happen is that it will be from the prospective of a bunch of different people, their cameras and view. They will have "glimpses" of the monster, but I doubt they ever clearly show what it is.

 

Nobody in the world knows what the hell the monster is, and I just don't see how that is possible in this day and age, to keep a secret about a hyped movie this tightly under wraps.

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I see what your saying. My point is that if they don't show the monster at all and at the same time are trying to establish this as a realistic film, there has to be some gimmick involved. I view it as a paradox. They are trying to produce realism through cinema verite (hand held camera, small core of characters) but if they were to make a point in saying the creature can't be caught on camera for some ridiculous reason, the curtain is pulled back and their true motivations are revealed.

 

They are obviously just trying to cash in and quite frankly I don't blame them.

 

 

Well, it is a monster movie so I don't think realism is goal #1. :D

 

Seriously though, it's a 30 million dollar budget movie that is passing itself off as a big budget blockbuster combined with brilliant marketing. How did they do that and create hype for a Matt Reeves (of Felicity fame) project? By making the monster a secret and building up hype thanks to a hot name like JJ Abrams.

 

How do you keep it a secret? By never actually showing/having a monster in the first place, therefore never having to worry about an extra/key grip/graphic designer opening his/her mouth.

 

Movie will make a ton of money because of its excellent viral marketing.

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Not to go off your discussion, but this reminds me of a hypothetical that was brought up in a class of mine a couple years back.

 

Imagine a movie that's marketing campaign only consists of a trailer and TV spots with white text on black background that said the title and release date for a couple of weeks leading up to the release.

 

Little to nothing is known about the project besides maybe a few actors and the director. All of them are average and/or not big headliners or stars. Nobody knows nothing on its release date besides those factors.

 

How do you think the movie's opening weekend would fare?

 

Would people come see this film out of absolute 100% curiosity and ntrigue or would people not blindly see something they knew nothing about?

 

Would the film have any shelf life after the opening weekend?

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Not to go off your discussion, but this reminds me of a hypothetical that was brought up in a class of mine a couple years back.

 

Imagine a movie that's marketing campaign only consists of a trailer and TV spots with white text on black background that said the title and release date for a couple of weeks leading up to the release.

 

Little to nothing is known about the project besides maybe a few actors and the director. All of them are average and/or not big headliners or stars. Nobody knows nothing on its release date besides those factors.

 

How do you think the movie's opening weekend would fare?

 

Would people come see this film out of absolute 100% curiosity and ntrigue or would people not blindly see something they knew nothing about?

 

Would the film have any shelf life after the opening weekend?

I've seen commercial ads similar to that approach which only show a website briefly...and I'm not gonna lie--I'm interested.

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Not to go off your discussion, but this reminds me of a hypothetical that was brought up in a class of mine a couple years back.

 

Imagine a movie that's marketing campaign only consists of a trailer and TV spots with white text on black background that said the title and release date for a couple of weeks leading up to the release.

 

Little to nothing is known about the project besides maybe a few actors and the director. All of them are average and/or not big headliners or stars. Nobody knows nothing on its release date besides those factors.

 

How do you think the movie's opening weekend would fare?

 

Would people come see this film out of absolute 100% curiosity and ntrigue or would people not blindly see something they knew nothing about?

 

Would the film have any shelf life after the opening weekend?

I've seen commercial ads similar to that approach which only show a website briefly...and I'm not gonna lie--I'm interested.

The difference being there is infinite more cost and 'risk' with the unknown film.

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Not to go off your discussion, but this reminds me of a hypothetical that was brought up in a class of mine a couple years back.

 

Imagine a movie that's marketing campaign only consists of a trailer and TV spots with white text on black background that said the title and release date for a couple of weeks leading up to the release.

 

Little to nothing is known about the project besides maybe a few actors and the director. All of them are average and/or not big headliners or stars. Nobody knows nothing on its release date besides those factors.

 

How do you think the movie's opening weekend would fare?

 

Would people come see this film out of absolute 100% curiosity and ntrigue or would people not blindly see something they knew nothing about?

 

Would the film have any shelf life after the opening weekend?

 

The key to a film like that would be the person thought to be behind it. You would only need that one big name director/producer. If it followed every rule you gave but was billed as a "Quentin Tarantino Project", it would be a hit on opening weekend. Without JJ Abram's name nobody is talking about Cloverfield right now.

 

It would have zero shelf life though after opening weekend if it was not a great and/or enjoyable movie (there is a difference) that had people talking.

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Anyway, they could easily keep it a secret. The only people who have to know the identity of the monster are the ones doing the CGI rendering. Extras/grips/etc. can do their jobs during the actual shooting and react to nothing.

 

 

Maybe I am too cynical but I believe that even if you had a dozen (not sure if that number is too high or low) people working on the CGI, something would have leaked by now if they had something to leak.

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