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Barry Larkin Retires


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c/o ESPN.com:

WASHINGTON -- Shortstop Barry Larkin, a 12-time All-Star who spent his entire 19-year career with the Cincinnati Reds, has retired and joined the Washington Nationals in their front office as a special assistant.

 

"While his tasks and challenges will be different than he experienced as a player, Barry's presence coupled with an eagerness to be involved in all facets of our operations will undoubtedly yield positive results for both Barry and the Nationals," Washington general manager Jim Bowden said in a statement Sunday.

 

Larkin, in an Associated Press interview in late January, said he would like to play another season, but could not commit himself to play for anyone other than the Reds, his hometown team. The Reds had rejected his overtures to return for a 20th season, deciding to turn the position over to younger players.

 

Larkin, 40, said he had turned down offers to start for several other teams because he could not envision himself playing for a different club.

 

"I thought eventually I'd be able to say, yeah, I can do this," he said in the interview. "But I'm big on loyalty. I couldn't come to grips with making a 100-percent commitment [to another team]."

 

Larkin's 19-year tenure with the Reds was the longest streak among active players who had been with just one team.

 

Over 2,180 games, he hit .295 with 441 doubles, 76 triples, 198 home runs, 960 RBI and 379 stolen bases. He helped the team win the World Series in 1990 and was National League MVP in 1995.

 

Larkin batted .289 in 111 games last season and was chosen for his 12th All-Star team, prompting him to re-evaluate his decision to retire after 2004. He wanted to stay with the Reds for another season, but they decided to turn the position over to younger players.

 

Until Sunday's announcement, Larkin was managing a sports complex in Orlando, Fla., working in a development management group, spending time with his family and considering his options for playing one more season.

 

He long had dreamt of working in the Red's front office, but that chance disappeared when he and the team's chief operating officer, John Allen, clashed over a take-it-or-leave-it contract offer late in the 2003 season. Larkin was prepared to leave then; the team reconsidered and negotiated a one-year deal for 2004.

 

Bowden was the Reds' general manager from 1992-2003.

 

"I have long admired Barry's on- and off-field knowledge and judgment of the game," Bowden said.

 

In the Nationals' front office, Larkin is joining a former Reds' manager, Bob Boone, and teammate, pitcher Jose Rijo, as special assistants to Bowden.

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HOF

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First Ballot. :thumbup

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Agreed.

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Wont happen...he was a good player but i cant see him in the hall.

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No?

 

Larkin is a career .295 hitter. He hit 198 career homers. An 83% successful stealing percentage, with 379 steals. Larkin was one of the best base runners of his time. 2300+ career hits. The first 30-30 shortstop in the history of the game. One of the most, if not the most, complete player of his time. He is the only shortstop in Major League history and just the fifth player ever to accumulate at least 2,200 hits, 190 home runs and 370 stolen bases. Larkin has been selected to the All Star team 12 times. 9 Silver Slugger awards, and even an MVP title in the 1995 season. Larkin has multiple Gold Gloves, I cannot find the number.

 

If not for the last few injury plagued years, BL would be a .300+ career hitter. So productive over so many years playing on astroturf.

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Not HOF material? He was the shortstop of the 90's.

 

The HOF should be about who were the best players at their positions during each era.. comparing shorstops from the early 90's to shortstops of the now is just stupid.

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when I spoke to Rob Neyer last night, he said in his mind ,he is surely a first ballot HOFer but he wonders if the sportswriters will look at his stats and wrongly compare them to ARod, Tejada, Nomar, etc..

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Not HOF material? He was the shortstop of the 90's.

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I think Ripken was SS of the 90's followed by Ozzie Smith

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Ozzie was a classic all glove, no bat SS. Ripken may have been the SS of 80's, but got older and had to be moved. Larkin was a great all around player who never really slowed down in the field as he got older. Barry really helped usher in the new mold of SS.

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Not HOF material? He was the shortstop of the 90's.

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I think Ripken was SS of the 90's followed by Ozzie Smith

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Ozzie was a classic all glove, no bat SS. Ripken may have been the SS of 80's, but got older and had to be moved. Larkin was a great all around player who never really slowed down in the field as he got older. Barry really helped usher in the new mold of SS.

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The "new mold" of SS started with Nomar/Jeter/A-Rod. Aside from '96 when he hit 33 HR's, he only hit 20+ HR's once and is a career sub .300 hitter. That falls into the older style SS I think. I think he can make it into the hall on a weak HOF Ballot (like this year's). But he'll be passed over quite a bit.

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HE WAS THE BEST SHORTSTOP OF THE 90'S.

 

He's a 12 time all star (you don't get that unless you're the best at your position for many many years), a league MVP, great in the postseason(.338 BA in playoffs, and has a WS ring) and has 3 gold gloves.. would have had a crap ton more if it wasn't for Ozzie. He is a SURE THING for Hall of Fame and if not first ballot, then he will immediately after that.

 

The new generation of shorstops have nothing to do with the baseball in the early and mid 90's. You obviously have something against Larkin as this was proved by you trying to name better shortstops in the 90's, which is obviously wrong.

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You obviously have something against Larkin as this was proved by you trying to name better shortstops in the 90's, which is obviously wrong.

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No, I have no hidden agenda against him. I would just categorize him with Ripken/Smith than with Jeter/Tejada because his offensive numbers are closer to the older guys.

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