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Jose Fernandez wanted to stay a Marlin long term


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Though agent Scott Boras could have justified the decision at the time, it was unfortunate, in retrospect, that he rejected the Marlins’ four-year, $40 million offer to Jose Fernandez when he was recovering from Tommy John surgery.

 

According to an MLB official, Fernandez’s family would have gotten that money if he had signed that contract before his fatal boating accident.

 

An associate said even though Fernandez liked and respected Boras, he wanted to stay in Miami longterm and was considering taking meetings with other agents, concerned that Boras might not be able to strike a longterm deal with Miami.

 

He was due to become a free agent in 2018.

 

Boras has done some business with Miami, including a contract for pitcher Wei Yin Chen, but he also has had conflict with the Marlins’ front office, including their decision to send Marcell Ozuna to the minors for 5 1/2 weeks in 2015, a move which delayed his arbitration eligibility.

 

That source wasn’t sure Fernandez would have ever left Boras, because of their strong relationship. The point, though, is that Fernandez wanted to see if there was a way he could stay in Miami.

 

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/sports/spt-columns-blogs/barry-jackson/article108717512.html#storylink=cpy

 

Jose loved us back and didn't wanna leave this team... I may cry again.

 

 

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Though agent Scott Boras could have justified the decision at the time, it was unfortunate, in retrospect, that he rejected the Marlins’ four-year, $40 million offer to Jose Fernandez when he was recovering from Tommy John surgery.

According to an MLB official, Fernandez’s family would have gotten that money if he had signed that contract before his fatal boating accident.

An associate said even though Fernandez liked and respected Boras, he wanted to stay in Miami longterm and was considering taking meetings with other agents, concerned that Boras might not be able to strike a longterm deal with Miami.

He was due to become a free agent in 2018.

Boras has done some business with Miami, including a contract for pitcher Wei Yin Chen, but he also has had conflict with the Marlins’ front office, including their decision to send Marcell Ozuna to the minors for 5 1/2 weeks in 2015, a move which delayed his arbitration eligibility.

That source wasn’t sure Fernandez would have ever left Boras, because of their strong relationship. The point, though, is that Fernandez wanted to see if there was a way he could stay in Miami.

 

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/sports/spt-columns-blogs/barry-jackson/article108717512.html#storylink=cpy

Jose loved us back and didn't wanna leave this team... I may cry again.

 

I knew this already. Between his family, the community, his love of the water, and his soon to be born daughter he wanted to stay here.

 

 

 

 

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I knew this already. Between his family, the community, his love of the water, and his soon to be born daughter he wanted to stay here.

 

Yeah but it's good to have at least some media acknowledgment of this because it would be quite easy for people to say "They never would have signed him long term and he was about to be traded anyways"

 

 

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Boras is an asshole, but in the end it was Jose's decision not to accept the 4/40. It was bad advice to not take it, but he didn't take it. 

 

I do agree with this. It wasn't 100% on Boras for not accepting it. Jose had the final say. I'm sure Boras influenced his decision but Jose had the final say. I don't think the media should be portraying Boras as a bad guy for this one. It's nice to know Jose would have considered staying here and would have considered leaving Boras to do so, but that also doesn't mean he'd for sure have done it.

 

 

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retire his hashtag?

 

No joke, was teaching a kid something in a math book and the kid abruptly stops and asked why there were hashtags in front of the number of each problem.

 

That generation is going to be even more like the millennials than the millennials are. No idea what the future holds.

 

 

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My opinion isn't going to be popular, but whatever.

 

This is clearly a hindsight 20/20 piece. 

 

Boras is an asshole, but in the end it was Jose's decision not to accept the 4/40. It was bad advice to not take it, but he didn't take it. 

 

I agree completely with this. If Jose were that committed to the Marlins, he would have overridden Boras and accepted that offer as he was coming back from TJ.

 

 

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My opinion isn't going to be popular, but whatever.

 

This is clearly a hindsight 20/20 piece. 

 

Boras is an asshole, but in the end it was Jose's decision not to accept the 4/40. It was bad advice to not take it, but he didn't take it. 

 

I'm with you, not to be a dick but I see this as revisionist history. Jose was a part of the community because he was drafted here. There are 10 teams he could sign with that would have access to water, and one with deep pockets that would covet him- the Dodgers.

 

Never mind all that though, a young man passed doing what he loved in a city that adored him. I don't understand the need to make this a bigger tragedy than this is for a already depressed franchise and fan base. He may have wanted to stay here, but he may have never got an offer he would have liked.

 

 

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It wasn't even bad advice not to take the money. Jose would've made that money and more in arbitration. There's no way he should've been banking on some freak accident happening when just a few more healthy seasons was going to net him an extra $210 million at least.

 

I also call BS on Jose staying here. Sure, he loved Miami and based on the city he would've loved to stay long term. The reality of the situation was he was going to go where the money was, and the Marlins weren't going to offer him $250 million in a few years. Jose Fernandez would've ended up a Dodger, Yankee, Cub, or with the Red Sox. 

 

I know the tragedy makes people want to say Jose was going to be a Marlin lifer, but the truth is he was being shopped and was likely to be traded in the 2017 offseason. 

 

 

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Damn, not this again. No he wasn't being shopped.

 

But, he likely would have been shopped in the 2017 off-season.

 

Ok I worded that poorly. They were listening to offers. They weren't trying to trade him but they weren't hanging up the phone on teams. 

 

 

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You're basically telling me Miguel Cabrera should've taken something like $30 million from the Marlins back in 2005 instead of waiting a few years and getting $210 million because of the chance of a freak accident killing him instantly. 

 

In a business sense Jose Fernandez would've been leaving $210 million on a the table by taking that offer. It would've been dumb for him to push his future big free agent contract even further with any potential arm injuries hurting his value. There's a reason Boras knows exactly what he's doing. He was getting every penny he could for Fernandez and was doing his job excellently. 

 

 

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Looking back on his post I think I know what squall meant when he said Jose was wrong because he died but I think wrong is the "wrong " word to use there. He died so now yes it's a shame that he didn't take that money which would have gone to his family. It wasn't "wrong" because at the time Jose had no idea he wouldn't be alive after 2016 but it was not the right decision in that it hurts the family today since he did unfortunately pass. Did I explain that right@squall?

 

 

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In Jose's case, it wasn't a matter of accepting either $40 million or $250 million. If he had taken the Marlins offer or something in that neighborhood, he would have been set for life and then be able to set himself up nicely for the mega deal when he was in his prime.

 

MarlinsLou always had a similar thought process when he was explaining how affordable a lot of arbitration buyouts plus extensions would be.

 

Jose and [mostly] Boras got a little greedy. Sure, Jose didn't expect to die in a boating accident, but life happens. He could have had more nagging injuries too. Very few Americans will have the opportunity to earn $40 million over their entire lifetimes and he would have earned it before he was $30 million.

 

I am not trying to knock Jose, but he really didn't demonstrate that he wanted to remain a Marlin long term. The ironic thing is that Jose's family is now going to depend heavily on the charity of Jeffrey Loria after Jose and Boras stiffed him in contract negotiations.

 

I know this all comes off as mean-spirited and resentful, but the awkward thing for me in all of the mourning over the past few weeks is that I never really got the impression from Jose that he was very committed to the Marlins despite how much they cherished him.

 

 

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