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Blatant lies in SI.com article?


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MIAMI (AP) -The game began on a damp, typically dreary night at the Florida Marlins' ballpark, with a couple of thousand fans in the stands, reaffirming that the city has yet to embrace its young, overachieving, playoff-chasing team.

 

By the ninth inning, the crowd was on its feet, roaring for the Marlins' latest rookie sensation, Anibal Sanchez.

 

Even South Florida gets excited about a no-hitter.

 

Sanchez threw the first one in 2 1/2 years, the longest such drought in the major league history, to help Florida beat the Arizona Diamondbacks 2-0 Wednesday.

 

Luckily for Sanchez, no-hitters thrown in mostly empty stadiums still count. The announced crowd was 12,561, but even with late arrivals, the actual turnout was perhaps half that for a team that ranks last in the major leagues in attendance.

 

"No-Hitter Night'' apparently needed more advance promotion. The atmosphere was so subdued that Marlins ace Dontrelle Willis, watching from the dugout, didn't realize Arizona was hitless until teammates charged the field after the final out.

 

Sanchez was mobbed near the mound, then pointed and thrust his fists to the stands, where his wife was easy to spot amid the many vacant seats.

 

"She was there,'' the 22-year-old Sanchez said, his eyes teary. "I love her, I love my family.''

 

Popular with his teammates, Sanchez showed endearing grace as he savored his night in the spotlight. He happily took a pie in the face from a teammate during a TV interview and beamed throughout a 10-minute news conference.

 

The smile widened when he was asked about his tears on the field.

 

"I cried because I was excited,'' he said. "That's the best moment of my life.''

 

The son of a truck driver, Sanchez is a teetotaler and devoted husband. His progress through the minor leagues was slowed by Tommy John surgery in 2003, and until Tuesday night he wasn't well known even in his native Venezuela.

 

Florida acquired him last November in the deal that sent Josh Beckett and Mike Lowell to the Boston Red Sox. He went 3-6 this season for Double-A Carolina before joining the Marlins, and in June he became the second starting pitcher in 10 seasons to win his major league debut as a visitor at Yankee Stadium.

 

One of four rookies in the Marlins' rotation, he has made 13 starts and is 7-2 with a 2.89 ERA.

 

"He has been tested as tough as a test can be, and has come through with flying colors,'' manager Joe Girardi said. "To have your first start at Yankee Stadium, that's a test. And then to watch him accomplish things has been remarkable. He has a great work ethic and a love for the game. You watch him and how the other players embrace him, and you can get a sense of what kind of guy he is.''

 

Those teammates helped Sanchez with some nifty glove work. Left fielder Josh Willingham made a diving catch, and shortstop Hanley Ramirez ranged left for a grounder and whirled to make the throw from behind second base. Dan Uggla, Mike Jacobs and Ramirez combined on a rare 4-3-6 double play to end the eighth inning.

 

All three gems were produced by rookies - no surprise, because the Marlins have played 21 this year.

 

Girardi, who caught Dwight Gooden's no-hitter and David Cone's perfect game, cringed when the Marlins violated the custom of shunning a pitcher throwing a no-hitter by talking to Sanchez on the bench.

 

"I don't think our guys are old enough to realize that superstition yet,'' Girardi said.

 

But Sanchez's luck held throughout. Arizona nearly broke up the no-hitter in the fifth, when Carlos Quentin hit a sharp grounder down the line. Third baseman Miguel Cabrera made a backhanded stop on one knee, then rose and threw wide, pulling first baseman Jacobs off the bag.

 

Without hesitation, official scorer Ron Jernick ruled the play an error. Cabrera said he didn't look at the scoreboard to check the ruling because he feared it would be a hit.

 

"Bad throw, bad throw, bad throw, man,'' Cabrera said with a grin.

 

The no-hitter was the first since Arizona's Randy Johnson threw a perfect game to beat Atlanta 2-0 on May 18, 2004, and it's the latest highlight in an improbable season for the Marlins.

 

With baseball's youngest team and lowest payroll, they started the season 11-31. But they surged into playoff contention and became the first club in major league history to climb above .500 after being 20 games under.

 

Sanchez's no-hitter was the Marlins' 14th win in 17 games, and they remained three games behind NL wild-card leader San Diego.

 

"What made this game interesting was there's a lot to winning it,'' Girardi said. "The no-hitter is obviously really important in Anibal's career, but the win was also important for this club.''

 

For a franchise long plagued with fan apathy, however, there's no evidence of playoff fever at the box office. The Marlins averaged 12,663 fans for their three-game series against Arizona, slightly below their season average of 13,428.

 

Team president David Samson hopes for bigger crowds down the stretch, as happened during the Marlins' run to the World Series title in 2003. Maybe the no-hitter will get fans coming to the ballpark.

 

Or perhaps it will take a perfect game or two.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/base...kie.s.gem.0916/

 

I'm sorry but there is NO FRIGGEN WAY the section of the article that I put in bold can possibly be true. All throughout the game there were shots of the dugout and all the players and D-Train was one of the ones who was the most hyped up, not to mention the fact that the ENTIRE TEAM was talking about the no-hitter in progress on the bench in between innings.

 

Shame on you Sports Illustrated for having the audacity to print such blatant lies, and it's truly sad that anytime the Marlins do anything good, the focus is on the attendance and whether we even deserve a team, not what actually happened on the field.

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MIAMI (AP) -The game began on a damp, typically dreary night at the Florida Marlins' ballpark, with a couple of thousand fans in the stands, reaffirming that the city has yet to embrace its young, overachieving, playoff-chasing team.

 

By the ninth inning, the crowd was on its feet, roaring for the Marlins' latest rookie sensation, Anibal Sanchez.

 

Even South Florida gets excited about a no-hitter.

 

Sanchez threw the first one in 2 1/2 years, the longest such drought in the major league history, to help Florida beat the Arizona Diamondbacks 2-0 Wednesday.

 

Luckily for Sanchez, no-hitters thrown in mostly empty stadiums still count. The announced crowd was 12,561, but even with late arrivals, the actual turnout was perhaps half that for a team that ranks last in the major leagues in attendance.

 

"No-Hitter Night'' apparently needed more advance promotion. The atmosphere was so subdued that Marlins ace Dontrelle Willis, watching from the dugout, didn't realize Arizona was hitless until teammates charged the field after the final out.

 

Sanchez was mobbed near the mound, then pointed and thrust his fists to the stands, where his wife was easy to spot amid the many vacant seats.

 

"She was there,'' the 22-year-old Sanchez said, his eyes teary. "I love her, I love my family.''

 

Popular with his teammates, Sanchez showed endearing grace as he savored his night in the spotlight. He happily took a pie in the face from a teammate during a TV interview and beamed throughout a 10-minute news conference.

 

The smile widened when he was asked about his tears on the field.

 

"I cried because I was excited,'' he said. "That's the best moment of my life.''

 

The son of a truck driver, Sanchez is a teetotaler and devoted husband. His progress through the minor leagues was slowed by Tommy John surgery in 2003, and until Tuesday night he wasn't well known even in his native Venezuela.

 

Florida acquired him last November in the deal that sent Josh Beckett and Mike Lowell to the Boston Red Sox. He went 3-6 this season for Double-A Carolina before joining the Marlins, and in June he became the second starting pitcher in 10 seasons to win his major league debut as a visitor at Yankee Stadium.

 

One of four rookies in the Marlins' rotation, he has made 13 starts and is 7-2 with a 2.89 ERA.

 

"He has been tested as tough as a test can be, and has come through with flying colors,'' manager Joe Girardi said. "To have your first start at Yankee Stadium, that's a test. And then to watch him accomplish things has been remarkable. He has a great work ethic and a love for the game. You watch him and how the other players embrace him, and you can get a sense of what kind of guy he is.''

 

Those teammates helped Sanchez with some nifty glove work. Left fielder Josh Willingham made a diving catch, and shortstop Hanley Ramirez ranged left for a grounder and whirled to make the throw from behind second base. Dan Uggla, Mike Jacobs and Ramirez combined on a rare 4-3-6 double play to end the eighth inning.

 

All three gems were produced by rookies - no surprise, because the Marlins have played 21 this year.

 

Girardi, who caught Dwight Gooden's no-hitter and David Cone's perfect game, cringed when the Marlins violated the custom of shunning a pitcher throwing a no-hitter by talking to Sanchez on the bench.

 

"I don't think our guys are old enough to realize that superstition yet,'' Girardi said.

 

But Sanchez's luck held throughout. Arizona nearly broke up the no-hitter in the fifth, when Carlos Quentin hit a sharp grounder down the line. Third baseman Miguel Cabrera made a backhanded stop on one knee, then rose and threw wide, pulling first baseman Jacobs off the bag.

 

Without hesitation, official scorer Ron Jernick ruled the play an error. Cabrera said he didn't look at the scoreboard to check the ruling because he feared it would be a hit.

 

"Bad throw, bad throw, bad throw, man,'' Cabrera said with a grin.

 

The no-hitter was the first since Arizona's Randy Johnson threw a perfect game to beat Atlanta 2-0 on May 18, 2004, and it's the latest highlight in an improbable season for the Marlins.

 

With baseball's youngest team and lowest payroll, they started the season 11-31. But they surged into playoff contention and became the first club in major league history to climb above .500 after being 20 games under.

 

Sanchez's no-hitter was the Marlins' 14th win in 17 games, and they remained three games behind NL wild-card leader San Diego.

 

"What made this game interesting was there's a lot to winning it,'' Girardi said. "The no-hitter is obviously really important in Anibal's career, but the win was also important for this club.''

 

For a franchise long plagued with fan apathy, however, there's no evidence of playoff fever at the box office. The Marlins averaged 12,663 fans for their three-game series against Arizona, slightly below their season average of 13,428.

 

Team president David Samson hopes for bigger crowds down the stretch, as happened during the Marlins' run to the World Series title in 2003. Maybe the no-hitter will get fans coming to the ballpark.

 

Or perhaps it will take a perfect game or two.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/base...kie.s.gem.0916/

 

I'm sorry but there is NO FRIGGEN WAY the section of the article that I put in bold can possibly be true. All throughout the game there were shots of the dugout and all the players and D-Train was one of the ones who was the most hyped up, not to mention the fact that the ENTIRE TEAM was talking about the no-hitter in progress on the bench in between innings.

 

Shame on you Sports Illustrated for having the audacity to print such blatant lies, and it's truly sad that anytime the Marlins do anything good, the focus is on the attendance and whether we even deserve a team, not what actually happened on the field.

 

 

FIRST REALIZATION

 

Sanchez said he first started to realize he had a no-hitter going in about the fifth inning. But it didn't dawn on some of his teammates until much later. Olivo said he didn't know the pitcher had a no-hitter going until the eighth inning. Dontrelle Willis, who was watching from inside the dugout, said he didn't realize what had happened until everyone sprang to their feet and ran onto the field.

 

Sanchez exuded confidence as he sat inside the dugout before going out to take the mound in the ninth.

 

'The last thing I thought when I went to the mound was I said, 'All right. One-two-three,' '' Sanchez said.

 

When Sanchez retired the first two hitters in quick order, Sanchez said he looked up at the scoreboard and noticed the zero under the hit column for Arizona.

 

It took Sanchez just two pitches to take care of Byrnes, who grounded a 0-1 slider to Ramirez. Sanchez squatted low as he watched Ramirez gobble up the ground ball, followed the flight of the ball as it zipped across the diamond to first baseman Wes Helms, and leaped in the air when the umpire signaled out.

 

Sanchez immediately began sobbing, and he wasn't the only one to well up.

 

''My eyes got a little watery,'' Olivo said.

 

''It brought a tear to my eyes,'' Girardi said.

 

''I got emotional when I saw him crying,'' said Willis, who began to cry, too, when he saw tears streaming down Sanchez's cheeks.

 

Later, after he had regained his composure, Sanchez could not stop smiling.

 

''This was my day,'' he said. ''I am so happy.''

 

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/sports/15456230.htm

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Calm down.

 

In the paper this morning, Dontrelle actually swore on his parents that he didn't know what was going on until after the final out. I think Dontrelle is telling the truth when he swears on his merms and pops.

 

definetly. it's just kinda shocking..who knows maybe dontrelel wasn't in the dugout for a portion of the game, that would be a good reason. but if he was in the dugout the entire game, i find this hard to believe.

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Let's assume Willis did know. It still offers the widely-held feelings of the clubhouse (that they didn't recognize until late in the game). It then merely assigns the overwhelming sentiment to a familiar figure - a newsworthy character. Untrue? Perhaps. Representive of the facts? Yes.

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Haha. Dontrelle must've been like "Why the f*** are they so excited?"

 

 

He actually said pretty much that, in different words, during an interview after the game. He was like, "They all started charging out of the dugout and I had no idea why. I followed them all out running, glanced at the scoreboard, and realized why."

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i think what accord's really upset about is the jab about attendance, not whether dontrelle knew or not. and i don't think it's unfair for SI -- or AP -- or whomever -- to note what a pitiful attendance was present for the game.

 

The players gripe about it -- the media gripes about it -- ownership would gripe about it but they're trying not to burn bridges.

 

Lousy attendance should have been expected for the start of the season. We'd just traded all of our marquee players save two and the experts were prognosticating a 100-loss season. Lousy attendance should have been expected for the first two months of the season, as well, because the Marlins were living up to those prognostications.

 

But for an exciting, young team in the playoff race only to draw 13,000 announced? That's criminal. EVERY reporter in the country has every right to be upset about how South Florida continues to ignore the Marlins. Do you know how many cities -- Major League or not -- would jump over each other to have what Miami's got?

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i think what accord's really upset about is the jab about attendance, not whether dontrelle knew or not. and i don't think it's unfair for SI -- or AP -- or whomever -- to note what a pitiful attendance was present for the game.

 

The players gripe about it -- the media gripes about it -- ownership would gripe about it but they're trying not to burn bridges.

 

Lousy attendance should have been expected for the start of the season. We'd just traded all of our marquee players save two and the experts were prognosticating a 100-loss season. Lousy attendance should have been expected for the first two months of the season, as well, because the Marlins were living up to those prognostications.

 

But for an exciting, young team in the playoff race only to draw 13,000 announced? That's criminal. EVERY reporter in the country has every right to be upset about how South Florida continues to ignore the Marlins. Do you know how many cities -- Major League or not -- would jump over each other to have what Miami's got?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just another out of state poster who has no clue what its like when EVERYDAY its 96 degrees and raining at 5:00 PM. The constant threat of rain down here is out of control.

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Just another out of state poster who has no clue what its like when EVERYDAY its 96 degrees and raining at 5:00 PM. The constant threat of rain down here is out of control.

 

Just another in state poster who can't think outside of the day to day excuses to comprehend the real problems the Marlins have garnering support.

 

(Will this get deleted for a second time?)

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i think what accord's really upset about is the jab about attendance, not whether dontrelle knew or not. and i don't think it's unfair for SI -- or AP -- or whomever -- to note what a pitiful attendance was present for the game.

 

The players gripe about it -- the media gripes about it -- ownership would gripe about it but they're trying not to burn bridges.

 

Lousy attendance should have been expected for the start of the season. We'd just traded all of our marquee players save two and the experts were prognosticating a 100-loss season. Lousy attendance should have been expected for the first two months of the season, as well, because the Marlins were living up to those prognostications.

 

But for an exciting, young team in the playoff race only to draw 13,000 announced? That's criminal. EVERY reporter in the country has every right to be upset about how South Florida continues to ignore the Marlins. Do you know how many cities -- Major League or not -- would jump over each other to have what Miami's got?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just another out of state poster who has no clue what its like when EVERYDAY its 96 degrees and raining at 5:00 PM. The constant threat of rain down here is out of control.

 

Just because I'm out of state NOW doesn't mean I haven't lived half my life in Miami...

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You know I've been saying this for a while now, when fans have again and again have teams dismantled in front of them after winning championships how can anyone get excited about anything. now, if the stadium does get built and this keeps happened, then yeah they would have something to write about but until then, what's to be expected. Jay Mariotti and a few others said it on ATH. you need to create a stable foundation, a stable franchise that people can root for for years before you can create a stable following, you need to give the fans something or someone to trust.

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Guest FlummoxedLummox

I doubt that even a perfect game or 2 would add much to the attendance.

 

The day following the no-hitter the weather had been perfect all day, Josh Johnson was pitching, they were playing the Phillies (who they were tied with in the Wild Card race), and still no one showed up. It's pretty outrageous that how little support this team gets.

 

No use beating a dead horse.

 

Hey how about those Dolphins!?! :rolleyes:

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Guest FlummoxedLummox

I doubt that even a perfect game or 2 would add much to the attendance.

 

No use beating a dead horse.

Fixed.

Don't touch my posts. I sure as hell don't need you to "fix" them.

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