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Best Coach Ever


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Alright here it is, this is a tough one so give it thought. You have to choose 1 head coach/manager as your choice for Best Coach Ever. This includes all NCAA, MLB, NHL, NFL and NHL head coaches and managers ever.

 

Choose one and explain why. Make this a great topic because it could be lots of fun if people try. This isn't going to be a tourney or anything, just a discussion thread seeing who everyone's favorite head coach ever is.

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Scotty Bowman. There is no single greater teacher in the game of hockey than Scotty was.

 

 

Here is a great story to the greatest coach ever in hockey and maybe all of professional sports:

 

In a career which encompasses the entire expansion era of the NHL, Amherst resident Scotty Bowman has seen everything the league has to offer. However, the NHL and its fans have never seen the likes of Bowman, nor will they again. Simply the most successful coach in the history of professional team sports, Bowman has left a trail of Gretzky-esque numbers which will never be approached.

 

The winningest coach in NHL history, and one of only five coaches with over 500 victories, Bowman was an immediate success with the St. Louis Blues, leading that team to the Stanley Cup finals in the first three years of its existence. After a legendary stint in Montreal, which featured four straight Cups (and five overall) in the 1970s, Bowman arrived in Buffalo in 1979 as coach and general manager of a rebuilding Sabres team.

 

Bowman's legacy in Buffalo has been unfairly tarnished by the failure to win a Stanley Cup here. However, his impact behind the bench was unmistakable. He presided over two of the best Sabre squads ever iced (110 points in 1980 and 103 points in 1984), and he drafted many players who enjoyed outstanding NHL careers in Buffalo and elsewhere (Dave Andreychuck, Tom Barrasso and Phil Housely, to name a few). Scotty won two divisional titles and 210 games in Buffalo coaching during parts of eight seasons.

 

Bowman produced two Cup winners in Pittsburgh, one as coach and another as director of player personnel. During the past seven seasons with the Detroit Red Wings, Scotty has achieved two significant (and untouchable) milestones, along with two more Stanley Cups. In February 1997, he coached his 1,000th NHL victory (Al Arbour stands second on the list with 781); in May 1998, he became the first NHL coach to coach three different teams to a Stanley Cup championship. Scotty has coached a record tying eight cup winners in his eleven Cup Finals appearances.

 

Although certainly blessed with tremendously talented players during his career (Guy LaFleur, Gilbert Perreault, Mario Lemieux, Steve Yzerman), Bowman's success has stemmed from an uncompromising commitment to excellence. Scott's often unusual and controversial methods have not always been popular with players, but no player has ever been able to question his devotion to winning. Scotty has always demanded nothing less from the players who have shared the spotlight with the latest hockey inductee of the Greater Buffalo Sports Hall of Fame.

 

 

Here are his stats:

Scotty Bowman is the winningest coach in NHL history with 9 Stanley Cups and a record of 1244-583-314. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1991.

 

 

He started as coach of the Blues where he led the new expansion franchise to the Stanley Cup finals 3 consecutive years. He then went on to coach the Canadians to 5 Stanley Cups in 8 seasons in the 70s. He won 45 plus games each year he was there. He led the Buffalo Sabres to no Cups but two of the greatest seasons in their history with years of 110 points and 103 points. He coached the Pittsburgh Penguins to their second of Lord Stanley's Cup. He finally wrapped up his career in Detroit where he helped revitalize hockey town. He went on to win a Stanley Cup in 1997, 1998, and 2002 with Detroit. He retired in 2002.

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John Wooden.

 

Cribbed from another site:

 

Indiana State record: 47-14

 

Led Indiana State to the conference title (1947)

 

Led Indiana State to the finals of the NAIA invitation (1948)

 

UCLA record: 620-147

 

Led Bruins to four 30-0 seasons (1963-64, 1966-67, 1971-72, 1972-73)

 

Led Bruins to 88 consecutive victories

 

Led Bruins to 38 straight NCAA tournament victories

 

Led Bruins to 149-2 record at Pauley Pavilion

 

Led Bruins to 19 PAC 10 championships

 

Led Bruins to 10 national championships, including seven in a row (1966-73)

 

NCAA College Basketball Coach of the Year six times (1964, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973)

 

The Sporting News Sports Man of the Year (1970)

 

Sports Illustrated Sports Man of the Year (1973)

 

During 40 years of coaching, compiled a 885-203 (.813) record

 

One of only Three individuals enshrined in the Hall of Fame as a player and as a coach

 

I would also suggest that basketball is the sport where the coach can have the biggest direct impact on the outcome of the game. Football is probably a close second, but the head coach has like 20 assistants (at least).

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Red Auerbach.

 

Red Auerbach created and coached the most dominant dynasty in the history of professional sports. He revolutionized the game of basketball and he was the single most dominant coach of all-time and while other coaches have had lot's of success, none were ever even close to being as consistent as him. In his day, he didn't just coach those great Celtics teams but he built them as well. All the other great coaches dominated a certain period of time, but Red dominated two completely different era's and all of the teams that he coached were built by him.

 

Scotty Bowman is definitely a close second, it was really a tossup between him and Red but since Scotty Bowman was already mentioned, I picked Red Auerbach.

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Wooden is a good choice and his accomplishments are astounding, but I think alot of his success came from recruiting not even being a shadow of what it is today, it wasnt competitive like it is today, UCLA basically got anyone they wanted. Also, Wooden didnt have to deal with players leaving early or the high school to NBA jump like there is today.

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Wooden is a good choice and his accomplishments are astounding, but I think alot of his success came from recruiting not even being a shadow of what it is today, it wasnt competitive like it is today, UCLA basically got anyone they wanted. Also, Wooden didnt have to deal with players leaving early or the high school to NBA jump like there is today.

I can see that point, but 7 national titles in a row? It's almost impossible to win two in a row now. To win 7 in a row, and 88 games in a row, takes such a level of perfection it's down right mind boggling.

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Wooden is a good choice and his accomplishments are astounding, but I think alot of his success came from recruiting not even being a shadow of what it is today, it wasnt competitive like it is today, UCLA basically got anyone they wanted. Also, Wooden didnt have to deal with players leaving early or the high school to NBA jump like there is today.

I can see that point, but 7 national titles in a row? It's almost impossible to win two in a row now. To win 7 in a row, and 88 games in a row, takes such a level of perfection it's down right mind boggling.

Agreed, Im not trying to take anything away from what they accomplished, it is something that will never be accomplished ever again.

 

In addition to my point on recruiting in their time, there also wasnt the emergence of the mid-major program like there is now. In the time of Wooden's dominance, there were the usual suspects that were great teams...not the Bucknells, old Gonzagas, Vermonts, and Kent States like we have today. Smaller lesser known programs can compete with the best teams now and actually win. That wasnt the case back then.

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Wooden is a good choice and his accomplishments are astounding, but I think alot of his success came from recruiting not even being a shadow of what it is today, it wasnt competitive like it is today, UCLA basically got anyone they wanted. Also, Wooden didnt have to deal with players leaving early or the high school to NBA jump like there is today.

 

not to mention he's the reason why the NCAA has such strict rules regarding recruiting violations...on top of that, Wooden gave nothing to the game

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To Hard to name just one coach for all sports so i'm gonna do it like this

 

NCAA FOOTBALL- KNUTE ROCKNE

NCAA BASKETBALL- JOHN WOODEN

NCAA BASEBALL- RON FRASER

MLB- SPARKY ANDERSON, EARL WEAVER

NHL- SCOTTY BOWMAN

NFL- DON SHULA

 

 

 

No NBA?

nobody really stands out in the NBA...Red Auerbach and Phil Jackson won all those championships, but Auerbach had Bill Russell all those years, and Jackson had MJ then Shaq

NCAA football: Joe Paterno

NCAA basketball: Pete Newell- no coach has influenced as many other coaches and players as he has...any NCAA or NBA player 6'6" or above have gone to him for help, a...not to mentioned he owned Wooden and probably would have won a lot more championships had he not retired so early

MLB: John McGraw- second winningest manager in baseball history, but had a much better winning percentage than Connie Mack

NFL: Bill Walsh...revolutionized the game with the west coast offense, and helped developed ROnnie Lott, Steve Young, Jerry Rice, and Joe Montana into arguably the four greatest players of all time...won three superbowls, and three of his proteges (George Seifert, Mike Holmgren, BIll Shanahan) have gone on to coach their teams to a combine 5 super bowls

NBA: Phil Jackson...yeah, he had some great players, but he does have 9 championships anyone that can get Shaq and Kobe to co-exist for 4 years has to be #1

NHL: Scotty Bowman....he's #1 among all sports, because all the other sports can be disputed...in the NHL, you can't make a case for anybody else

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  • 1 month later...

James Naismith?

 

 

I mean its from his lineage of coaching that has basically produced this:

 

 

Allen

Smith

Brown

Popovich

 

Look at the achievements of all 4 of those coaches and you can tell easily who was the best coach ever. Not only has his most prominent 'pupils' been largely successful, but they all truly teach the game of basketball the way its meant to be played.

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James Naismith?

 

 

I mean its from his lineage of coaching that has basically produced this:

 

 

Allen

Smith

Brown

Popovich

 

Look at the achievements of all 4 of those coaches and you can tell easily who was the best coach ever. Not only has his most prominent 'pupils' been largely successful, but they all truly teach the game of basketball the way its meant to be played.

 

dont forget Roy Williams in that lineage

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James Naismith?

 

 

I mean its from his lineage of coaching that has basically produced this:

 

 

Allen

Smith

Brown

Popovich

 

Look at the achievements of all 4 of those coaches and you can tell easily who was the best coach ever. Not only has his most prominent 'pupils' been largely successful, but they all truly teach the game of basketball the way its meant to be played.

 

dont forget Roy Williams in that lineage

may bad and i'm sure i'm forgetting a few others as well.

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