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Turn Off The Lights


Piazza31
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Hey everybody,

 

I encourage everyone to be open and share their memorable experiance's at the ballpark. Be it the smell of the grass when you visited your first time, to the one creepy dude who you swear you bump into all the time at the Urinals (or Powder Rooms for you lady's.)

 

One of my Best Memories is from 2008, when I went to see the Marlins and the Giants play on my 21st Birthday. By the 4th inning I was gone mentally (it was my 21st Birthday), but by the 9th inning I realized the woman I was with will be the one I marry. That day we had only dated for a few weeks, but we've been together ever since.

 

Unfortunatly, I don't remember much of that evening---but I do know this---I wouldn't change it for the world.

 

February 25, 2011

By Christopher Fernandez

MarlinsBaseball.com Writer

 

With all the subtlety of a bulldozer and the beauty of Megan Griffin, 2011 marks the final year of Sun Life Stadium. It has been home to two World Champions and countless rain delays in its 18 years of use but its real glory comes from within its concrete walls and spiral staircases.

 

Built and funded originally by former Miami Dolphins owner Joe Robbie, Sun Life Stadium was constructed with two primary goals in mind; providing a state of the art Football Stadium for the soaring Miami Dolphins as a replacement to the ancient Orange Bowl and to serve as a final destination for Major League Baseball should one of their clubs look to relocate.

 

Originally named after Joe Robbie himself (Joe Robbie Stadium), the stadium was built with the intention of being able to convert a section of seats into a retractable section and a slightly larger than normal grass surface to allow for a Major League Diamond. It was built and partially funded with spectacular club levels as well as executive suites that required advance payment from Long Term Miami Dolphins Season Ticket Holders due to the lack of government funding rarely seen these days outside of South Florida. Built on a piece of land in Miami Gardens, its primary focus for its first 5 years was to host football games.

 

However, Robbie felt it was only a matter of time before Miami was seriously considered as a Major League market, and felt that with his concrete legacy’s ability to convert from Football to Soccer to Baseball in a matter of hours, would soon be the crown jewel of two major sports.

 

In 1990 Wayne Huizenga purchased 50% of Joe Robbie Stadium, and announced plans to apply for a Major League Baseball expansion franchise. Within a year, Huizenga succeeded when it was announced that MLB would be adopting two National League clubs for the 1993 Season. By 1994 he had also succeeded in acquiring the other 50% of the stadium for 100% ownership.

 

April 5th 1993’s first pitch strike by a then 45 year-old and Hialeah High School Grown Charlie Hough would serve as a sign of things to come for the stadium. Entering its 18th year as home to the Marlins, it has played host to World Series Champions, Milestones, Perfect Games, No Hitters and unprecedented seasons.

 

During the 1995 Season, the Stadium played host to Miami’s own and Future Hall of Famer Andre Dawson’s Swan Song. One of the final images of Dawson’s career is of being driven around the outfield in a golf card waving to the tearful and enthusiastic crowd.

 

The Following season in 1996, Al Leiter pitched the first No Hitter in Marlins against their expansion brother the Colorado Rockies. This feat has been accomplished three times during Sun Life Stadium’s history, once by then Rookie Anibal Sanchez against the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2006 and more recently by Philadelphia’s Cy Young Winner and Ace Roy Halladay during a perfect game last season in 2010.

 

In 1997 during the Marlins 5th year at then Pro Player Stadium, the 95th World Series was played. Having clinched both the Wild Card and NL Pennant in their 5th season as an Expansion Franchise, the Marlins set a record as the youngest World Series competitor in MLB history. During Game 7 of what is considered by many to be one of the 20 greatest games ever played as Edgar Renteria drove home Craig Counsell for the Marlin’s third and final run in the bottom of the 11th inning to be crowned champions.

 

That World Series is one of the highest attended in MLB history as it hosted consistently 67,000 fans and no empty seats for each of the 4 World Series games played there.

 

In 2003, the Stadium once again played host to the postseason. One of the most memorable moments for any current fan is the game ending OF Assist by Jeff Conine to Ivan Rodriguez. In front of the stadium’s famous “Teal Monster�, Conine exhibited the professionalism and determination of that years Marlins. Led by World Series MVP Josh Beckett’s Arm and Conine’s leadership, the Marlin’s marched right onto the 100th World Series in history and eventually took down the New York Yankees.

 

Since the 2003 Season, the “Hunt for Teal October� has been delayed however the Sun Life Stadium plays host to some of the games brightest stars.

 

Perennial MVP candidate Shortstop Hanley Ramirez roams the infield, as Cy Young Finalist and 2002 Draft Pick Pitcher Josh Johnson routinely puts away the competition. In 2010, Johnson lead the National League with a 2.30 ERA, marking the second time an ERA Champion had been crowned due to the Stadiums expansive playing field.

 

In 2011, look for the final season for the Marlins in Sun Life Stadium to be memorable as Ramirez, Johnson and the bat of Michael Stanton look to bring the house down in a blaze of glory.

 

With a little luck the bat of Michael Stanton will turn the lights off during the 2011 World Series, marking a fitting end to one of MLB’s forgettable ballparks.

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Found the first game I went to. A loss against Pittsburgh on a saturday. http://www.baseball-almanac.com/box-scores/boxscore.php?boxid=199708160FLO

 

I was at Livan's 15 K game, the game where Conine threw out Snow at the plate, and dozens of other games; but Ill never forget walking out from the concourse and seeing the field and stadium for the first time. I remember it seemed enormous.

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My most memorable game being at was probably game 3 of the '03 NLDS (game before the pudge tag). And when Pudge got the GW hit the place exploded. EASILY the loudest game I've been too.

 

Can't wait to move out of course, but I don't think any Marlins fan will forget all the historic moments that happened in the Marlins' brief history at Joe Robbie/Pro Player/Dolphins/Landshark/Sun Life Stadium

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i remember my first game was when we played the Astros on May 11th, 2005. I still remeber it well as it was the game where Pierre got on with a triple then Damion Easley followed up with a homerun to centerfield. I remember how these drunk fans were singing "Mary had a little lamb" to Mike Lamb who then started Right Field for Houston. I remember asking my friend why they took D-Train out in the 9th when he had only given up one run (and this was before i learned what a save was) as Todd Jones came in. He then told me why and thats when i really started loving baseball.

MY favorite game though was last summer on June 19th when we played the Rays. That was the game where they handed out 10,000 vuvuzelas to commemorate the World Cup. It ended up sounding like if you were next to a jet plane and the players and umps were wearing ear plugs to drown out the noise. It ended up being a extra-inning affair then Jorge Sosa walked the bases loaded to put them up by one.

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Other than playoff and WS games, I remember distinctly the game where Luis Castillo's 35 game hit streak ended.

 

It was a Saturday night in June 2002, and that place was rockin' as the Marlins batted in the ninth. Everybody wanted to see LC get one more shot to get a hit after going 0-4.

 

Tie game. RISP and Tim Raines at bat with one out. #1 on deck.

 

Torborg could've had Rock strike out on purpose, just to give Little Looie one more shot. After all, the fish weren't going to the playoffs in '02, and the LC story was the best thing happening.

 

But no - TR singles to center - game over.

 

Disappointing, but very memorable al mismo tiempo.

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The vuvuzela game was the worst sports vent I've ever been to.

 

 

We were just talking about that game the other day. We all had it listed as the worst give away of all time.

Vuvuzela has to be right up there-an embarrasment and annoying. The night of the silver streamers was also a mess. Best game for me-so hard not to pick a playoff game or a world series game, especially game 7 in 1997-lot of personal emotions about that game and the last game I had with my Dad. But all in all, first game ever in 1993-I was sharing 4 seats for the season (did not know the other people-the marlins arranged the plan) and we each got one ticket for the first game. So, went by myself and just stopped as I walked in taking in finally having a major league team in my hometown. Just euphoric. But darn, no one of the other 3 tickets showed up and the seats were empty. Could have taken my family-that was a pisser but I still loved it. Remember the broadcast also and Chris Berman on the opening pitch, a generous strike, said "and the marlins win the pennant".(or something close to that).

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Other than playoff and WS games, I remember distinctly the game where Luis Castillo's 35 game hit streak ended.

 

It was a Saturday night in June 2002, and that place was rockin' as the Marlins batted in the ninth. Everybody wanted to see LC get one more shot to get a hit after going 0-4.

 

Tie game. RISP and Tim Raines at bat with one out. #1 on deck.

 

Torborg could've had Rock strike out on purpose, just to give Little Looie one more shot. After all, the fish weren't going to the playoffs in '02, and the LC story was the best thing happening.

 

But no - TR singles to center - game over.

 

Disappointing, but very memorable al mismo tiempo.

 

 

I was never so upset to win a ballgame. I remember exactly where I was, too, in my grandparents' kitchen ha.

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Other than playoff and WS games, I remember distinctly the game where Luis Castillo's 35 game hit streak ended.

 

It was a Saturday night in June 2002, and that place was rockin' as the Marlins batted in the ninth. Everybody wanted to see LC get one more shot to get a hit after going 0-4.

 

Tie game. RISP and Tim Raines at bat with one out. #1 on deck.

 

Torborg could've had Rock strike out on purpose, just to give Little Looie one more shot. After all, the fish weren't going to the playoffs in '02, and the LC story was the best thing happening.

 

But no - TR singles to center - game over.

 

Disappointing, but very memorable al mismo tiempo.

 

 

I was never so upset to win a ballgame. I remember exactly where I was, too, in my grandparents' kitchen ha.

 

big debate after the game was, do you have Raines hit away or should they actually have asked him to strike out? Is it a cheap ploy to have the guy strike out on purpose and everyone should always try to get a hit, blah, blah, etc, etc?

 

I think it's a no-brainer personally. Get him to make an out, doesn't have to be obvious or anything...

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