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Sheffield: Latin Players Easier To Control Than Blacks


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The percentage of African-Americans playing Major League Baseball is at an all-time low and Gary Sheffield says he has a theory why that's the case.

 

In an interview with GQ magazine that's currently on newsstands, the typically outspoken Tigers designated hitter said Latin players have replaced African-Americans as baseball's most prevalent minority because they are easier to control.

 

"I called it years ago. What I called is that you're going to see more black faces, but there ain't no English going to be coming out. ? [it's about] being able to tell [Latin players] what to do -- being able to control them," he told the magazine.

 

"Where I'm from, you can't control us. You might get a guy to do it that way for a while because he wants to benefit, but in the end, he is going to go back to being who he is. And that's a person that you're going to talk to with respect, you're going to talk to like a man.

 

"These are the things my race demands. So, if you're equally good as this Latin player, guess who's going to get sent home? I know a lot of players that are home now can outplay a lot of these guys."

 

According to a 2005 report by the University of Central Florida Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, only 8.5 percent of major leaguers were African American -- the lowest percentage since the report was initiated in the mid-1980s. By contrast, whites comprised 59.5 percent of the majors' player pool, Latinos 28.7 percent and Asians 2.5.

 

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2891875

 

A big :psign to those quotes.

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I think his point is somewhat true, but it's what he says that kills his argument.

 

The reason that there are more latino players in baseball than African Americans has a lot to do with nurturing the game in the child's youth. By and large, little league is dominated by white boys (and girls), as the major league numbers show.

 

However, when little league turns competitive and travel and all-star teams are formed, hispanic players are generally recruited by the coaches in lieu of African Americans. Why? Well, the most prevalent theory I've heard is that African American children are being turned onto football and basketball as their "make it your focus" sports. There are myriad reasons for this, many of which have been discussed here, but the essence of this is if a travel team coach goes to a hispanic child/family and asks them to play on his team it's an "OK" rather than the "no thanks" generally received from African Americans or even whites because of higher priority committments.

 

Now, does it have to do with "controling" them, no.

 

Simply, the language issues are what make this a talking point (since, if I don't speak your language, me mouthing off doesn't hold much weight), but it's the value structure by the different cultures that has led to such a stark divide.

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I think his point is somewhat true, but it's what he says that kills his argument.

 

The reason that there are more latino players in baseball than African Americans has a lot to do with nurturing the game in the child's youth. By and large, little league is dominated by white boys (and girls), as the major league numbers show.

 

However, when little league turns competitive and travel and all-star teams are formed, hispanic players are generally recruited by the coaches in lieu of African Americans. Why? Well, the most prevalent theory I've heard is that African American children are being turned onto football and basketball as their "make it your focus" sports. There are myriad reasons for this, many of which have been discussed here, but the essence of this is if a travel team coach goes to a hispanic child/family and asks them to play on his team it's an "OK" rather than the "no thanks" generally received from African Americans or even whites because of higher priority committments.

 

Now, does it have to do with "controling" them, no.

 

Simply, the language issues are what make this a talking point (since, if I don't speak your language, me mouthing off doesn't hold much weight), but it's the value structure by the different cultures that has led to such a stark divide.

 

Well the main reason that football and basketball has become the African American child's focus sport is that in college you can get a full ride for those sports, however in base full rides are hardly ever handed out and you won't get one on a good team if you do get one at all. So, if you can't afford college and want to go the sport route of getting in baseball is definitely not the sport for you. I went to almost every college baseball home game at Alabama and even the traditional black schools such as Mississippi Valley State, which is in the SWAC, had a primarily white team.

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I think his point is somewhat true, but it's what he says that kills his argument.

 

The reason that there are more latino players in baseball than African Americans has a lot to do with nurturing the game in the child's youth. By and large, little league is dominated by white boys (and girls), as the major league numbers show.

 

However, when little league turns competitive and travel and all-star teams are formed, hispanic players are generally recruited by the coaches in lieu of African Americans. Why? Well, the most prevalent theory I've heard is that African American children are being turned onto football and basketball as their "make it your focus" sports. There are myriad reasons for this, many of which have been discussed here, but the essence of this is if a travel team coach goes to a hispanic child/family and asks them to play on his team it's an "OK" rather than the "no thanks" generally received from African Americans or even whites because of higher priority committments.

 

Now, does it have to do with "controling" them, no.

 

Simply, the language issues are what make this a talking point (since, if I don't speak your language, me mouthing off doesn't hold much weight), but it's the value structure by the different cultures that has led to such a stark divide.

 

Well the main reason that football and basketball has become the African American child's focus sport is that in college you can get a full ride for those sports, however in base full rides are hardly ever handed out and you won't get one on a good team if you do get one at all. So, if you can't afford college and want to go the sport route of getting in baseball is definitely not the sport for you. I went to almost every college baseball home game at Alabama and even the traditional black schools such as Mississippi Valley State, which is in the SWAC, had a primarily white team.

 

That's not true. You can get a full ride for baseball, to big schools, D1 schools.

 

What the problem is is that baseball cannot be played as a pickup inner city sport. It has, for better or worse, forced its way onto grass, so by extension, into the suburbs. It's impossible to organize as a 2-2 or 3-3 sport. It takes specialized equipment well above just sneakers and a ball to play.

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Guest FlummoxedLummox

I think his point is somewhat true, but it's what he says that kills his argument.

 

The reason that there are more latino players in baseball than African Americans has a lot to do with nurturing the game in the child's youth. By and large, little league is dominated by white boys (and girls), as the major league numbers show.

 

However, when little league turns competitive and travel and all-star teams are formed, hispanic players are generally recruited by the coaches in lieu of African Americans. Why? Well, the most prevalent theory I've heard is that African American children are being turned onto football and basketball as their "make it your focus" sports. There are myriad reasons for this, many of which have been discussed here, but the essence of this is if a travel team coach goes to a hispanic child/family and asks them to play on his team it's an "OK" rather than the "no thanks" generally received from African Americans or even whites because of higher priority committments.

 

Now, does it have to do with "controling" them, no.

 

Simply, the language issues are what make this a talking point (since, if I don't speak your language, me mouthing off doesn't hold much weight), but it's the value structure by the different cultures that has led to such a stark divide.

Swift, you're not agreeing with what he says at all. You each offer completely different reasons for the demographic change. From my understanding of your post, the only thing you two agree on is that a demographic divide in fact exists. You offer a cultural explanation, where hispanic children grow up with a greater appreciation for the game, while African American children have different priorities. Sheffield offers a purely racist explanation, saying African Americans are better ballplayers who are culturally superior because they can't be controlled, and are thus overlooked in favor of the more malleable hispanic players. Why even put yourself in Sheffield's corner?

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I think his point is somewhat true, but it's what he says that kills his argument.

 

The reason that there are more latino players in baseball than African Americans has a lot to do with nurturing the game in the child's youth. By and large, little league is dominated by white boys (and girls), as the major league numbers show.

 

However, when little league turns competitive and travel and all-star teams are formed, hispanic players are generally recruited by the coaches in lieu of African Americans. Why? Well, the most prevalent theory I've heard is that African American children are being turned onto football and basketball as their "make it your focus" sports. There are myriad reasons for this, many of which have been discussed here, but the essence of this is if a travel team coach goes to a hispanic child/family and asks them to play on his team it's an "OK" rather than the "no thanks" generally received from African Americans or even whites because of higher priority committments.

 

Now, does it have to do with "controling" them, no.

 

Simply, the language issues are what make this a talking point (since, if I don't speak your language, me mouthing off doesn't hold much weight), but it's the value structure by the different cultures that has led to such a stark divide.

 

Well the main reason that football and basketball has become the African American child's focus sport is that in college you can get a full ride for those sports, however in base full rides are hardly ever handed out and you won't get one on a good team if you do get one at all. So, if you can't afford college and want to go the sport route of getting in baseball is definitely not the sport for you. I went to almost every college baseball home game at Alabama and even the traditional black schools such as Mississippi Valley State, which is in the SWAC, had a primarily white team.

 

That's not true. You can get a full ride for baseball, to big schools, D1 schools.

 

What the problem is is that baseball cannot be played as a pickup inner city sport. It has, for better or worse, forced its way onto grass, so by extension, into the suburbs. It's impossible to organize as a 2-2 or 3-3 sport. It takes specialized equipment well above just sneakers and a ball to play.

 

Full rides do not come very often in NCAA baseball. Only way someone gets a full ride to college is either a. They have great grades or b. They are Alex Rodriguez type baseball players.

 

Baseball doesnt gain as much profit as Football or Basketball.

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just one thing, don't assume black=inner city. not all black people are poor and not all of them live in inner cities, although many do.

 

but it is alot harder to play baseball because of the bodies needed to play, compared to as little as 2 in basketball and 4 in football. those sports are easier to play with less people.

 

and baseball is not attractive to poor (not just the blacks) folks because of the few college scholarships you see in baseball and that you won't get money right away.

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I think his point is somewhat true, but it's what he says that kills his argument.

 

The reason that there are more latino players in baseball than African Americans has a lot to do with nurturing the game in the child's youth. By and large, little league is dominated by white boys (and girls), as the major league numbers show.

 

However, when little league turns competitive and travel and all-star teams are formed, hispanic players are generally recruited by the coaches in lieu of African Americans. Why? Well, the most prevalent theory I've heard is that African American children are being turned onto football and basketball as their "make it your focus" sports. There are myriad reasons for this, many of which have been discussed here, but the essence of this is if a travel team coach goes to a hispanic child/family and asks them to play on his team it's an "OK" rather than the "no thanks" generally received from African Americans or even whites because of higher priority committments.

 

Now, does it have to do with "controling" them, no.

 

Simply, the language issues are what make this a talking point (since, if I don't speak your language, me mouthing off doesn't hold much weight), but it's the value structure by the different cultures that has led to such a stark divide.

 

Well the main reason that football and basketball has become the African American child's focus sport is that in college you can get a full ride for those sports, however in base full rides are hardly ever handed out and you won't get one on a good team if you do get one at all. So, if you can't afford college and want to go the sport route of getting in baseball is definitely not the sport for you. I went to almost every college baseball home game at Alabama and even the traditional black schools such as Mississippi Valley State, which is in the SWAC, had a primarily white team.

 

That's not true. You can get a full ride for baseball, to big schools, D1 schools.

 

What the problem is is that baseball cannot be played as a pickup inner city sport. It has, for better or worse, forced its way onto grass, so by extension, into the suburbs. It's impossible to organize as a 2-2 or 3-3 sport. It takes specialized equipment well above just sneakers and a ball to play.

 

Full rides do not come very often in NCAA baseball. Only way someone gets a full ride to college is either a. They have great grades or b. They are Alex Rodriguez type baseball players.

 

Baseball doesnt gain as much profit as Football or Basketball.

 

Or a two way player, but then you would need to be close to an all American with the bat and on the mound. Not to mention the new rules changes coming to college baseball in 08, that raises the minimum scholarship one can receive to 30% of one whole scholarship. It will be almost impossible to get a full ride now.

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I think his point is somewhat true, but it's what he says that kills his argument.

 

The reason that there are more latino players in baseball than African Americans has a lot to do with nurturing the game in the child's youth. By and large, little league is dominated by white boys (and girls), as the major league numbers show.

 

However, when little league turns competitive and travel and all-star teams are formed, hispanic players are generally recruited by the coaches in lieu of African Americans. Why? Well, the most prevalent theory I've heard is that African American children are being turned onto football and basketball as their "make it your focus" sports. There are myriad reasons for this, many of which have been discussed here, but the essence of this is if a travel team coach goes to a hispanic child/family and asks them to play on his team it's an "OK" rather than the "no thanks" generally received from African Americans or even whites because of higher priority committments.

 

Now, does it have to do with "controling" them, no.

 

Simply, the language issues are what make this a talking point (since, if I don't speak your language, me mouthing off doesn't hold much weight), but it's the value structure by the different cultures that has led to such a stark divide.

Swift, you're not agreeing with what he says at all. You each offer completely different reasons for the demographic change. From my understanding of your post, the only thing you two agree on is that a demographic divide in fact exists. You offer a cultural explanation, where hispanic children grow up with a greater appreciation for the game, while African American children have different priorities. Sheffield offers a purely racist explanation, saying African Americans are better ballplayers who are culturally superior because they can't be controlled, and are thus overlooked in favor of the more malleable hispanic players. Why even put yourself in Sheffield's corner?

 

Well, I agreed with his assertion that if a coach had a choice of a Latino or African American player, he's taking the Latino, but I tried to substantiate my post since I know that it'd be taken as controversial. So I guess that's why I lumped myself in with him.

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