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California Schools To Push Ebonics


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Incorporating Ebonics into a new school policy that targets black students, the lowest-achieving group in the San Bernardino City Unified School District, may provide students a more well-rounded curriculum, said a local sociologist.

 

The goal of the district's policy is to improve black students' academic performance by keeping them interested in school. Compared with other racial groups in the district, black students go to college the least and have the most dropouts and suspensions.

 

Blacks make up the second largest racial group in the district, trailing Latinos.

 

A pilot of the policy, known as the Students Accumulating New Knowledge Optimizing Future Accomplishment Initiative, has been implemented at two city schools.

 

Mary Texeira, a sociology professor at Cal State San Bernardino, commended the San Bernardino Board of Education for approving the policy in June.

 

Texeira suggested that including Ebonics in the program would be beneficial for students. Ebonics, a dialect of American English that is spoken by many blacks throughout the country, was recognized as a separate language in 1996 by the Oakland school board.

 

"Ebonics is a different language, it's not slang as many believe,' Texeira said. "For many of these students Ebonics is their language, and it should be considered a foreign language. These students should be taught like other students who speak a foreign language.'

 

Texeira said research has shown that students learn better when they fully comprehend the language they are being taught in.

 

"There are African Americans who do not agree with me. They say that (black students) are lazy and that they need to learn to talk,' Texeira said.

 

Len Cooper, who is coordinating the pilot program at the two city schools, said San Bernardino district officials do not plan to incorporate Ebonics into the program.

 

"Because Ebonics can have a negative stigma, we're not focusing on that,' Cooper said. "We are affirming and recognizing Ebonics through supplemental reading books (for students).'

 

Beginning in the 2005-06 school year, teachers will receive training on black culture and customs. District curriculum will now include information on the historical, cultural and social impact of blacks in society. Although the program is aimed at black students, other students can choose to participate.

 

The pilot program at Rio Vista Elementary and King Middle schools focuses on second-, fourth- and seventh-grade classes. District officials hope to train teachers from other schools using the program as a model.

 

Board member Danny Tillman, who pushed for the policy, said that full implementation of the program at all schools may take years, but the pilot program is a beginning.

 

"At every step we will see positive results,' Tillman said.

 

Tillman hoped the new policy would increase the number of black students going to college and participating in advanced courses.

 

Teresa Parra, board vice president, said she worried the new program would have an adverse effect.

 

"I'm afraid that now that we have this the Hispanic community, our largest population, will say, 'We want something for us.' Next we'll have the Asian community and the Jewish community (asking for their own programs). When will it end?'

 

Parra said the district should focus on helping all students who are at risk.

 

"I've always thought that we should provide students support based on their needs and not on their race,' Parra said.

 

Tillman disagreed with Parra, saying programs that help Latinos already exist in the district. He cited the district's English- as-a-second-language program.

 

Texeira urged people not be quick to judge the new program as socially exclusive. She said people need to be open to the program.

 

"Everybody has prejudices, but we must all learn to control that behavior,' Texeira said. She said a child's self confidence is tied to his or her cultural identity.

 

She compared the low performance of black students to starvation. "How can you be angry when you feed a family of starving children?'

 

Ratibu Jacocks, a member of the Westside Action Group, a coalition of black activists, said they are working with the district to ensure the policy is implemented appropriately.

 

"This isn't a feel-good policy. This is the real thing,' Jacocks said.

 

Jacocks said he didn't believe the new policy would create animosity. He said he welcomed the idea of other ethnic groups pushing for their own programs.

 

"When you are doing what's right, others will follow,' Jacocks said. "We have led the way before the civil-rights movement opened the door for women's rights and other movements.'

http://www.sbsun.com/Stories/0,1413,208~12...2969790,00.html

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What a stupid idea. What happens when they graduate, and have to get a job, but no one will understand them? The kids have to go to school and learn just like everyone else. The spanish kids have to learn in english, so why dont the black kids learn in english (which happens to be the only language they know)

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What a stupid idea. What happens when they graduate, and have to get a job, but no one will understand them? The kids have to go to school and learn just like everyone else. The spanish kids have to learn in english, so why dont the black kids learn in english (which happens to be the only language they know)

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thats not necessarily true in some places regarding spanish speakers learning english.

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What a stupid idea. What happens when they graduate, and have to get a job, but no one will understand them? The kids have to go to school and learn just like everyone else. The spanish kids have to learn in english, so why dont the black kids learn in english (which happens to be the only language they know)

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thats not necessarily true in some places regarding spanish speakers learning english.

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I believe they used to teach some in spanish, but california got rid of that. I might be mistaken however

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In regards to the topic, how can they "push" their own language on them? Blacks were stolen from Africa with their own customs and language. The generations after the first slowly adapted until they spoke a mixed form of English and their native tongues...aka ebonics. This language has evolved over the course of American history and mainly stayed constant with new slangs being added in time as happens in hip English speak. That said, in order to succeed in this economy a potential employee most likely needs to be able to both speak and write formal English. Depends on the workplace.

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Hard to believe but at one time California was considered one of the best places in the US to get an education , thanks to Teacher's Unions whose strength makes the major league baseball players union look like lightweights, bad teachers cant be fired so the lessons get dumbed down.....seriously in California I was reading an article where math is taught with the emphasis of building self esteem not actually learning how to do math , I am dead serious one of the questions was 2 + 2 = ? and how to do you feel about it and if the student gave the wrong answer the student wasnt corrected so they wouldnt be embarassed. For point of reference i am a grad student at UF and have taught before it is amazing how unprepared 18 years old are today btw i am only 27 the difference between the education i recieved and the education kids are getting today is amazing.

As to ebonics being taught in the classroom that is about as racist of a statement that can be made towards young African Americans , in essence it is saying they dont have the capacity to learn proper english, imo it is just a stereotype used to prop up poor teachers and justify their failures ,and allows them to keep their job.

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Well hold on here. Clearly these kids never actually learn English well. And I dont think they are saying they want to just teach these kids Ebonics. I think what they are saying is they should alter the format of stuff to make it more interesting to kids who arent learning anyway. If a kid can learn Calculus through whatever language, then he is better off than a kid who didnt learn Calculus through English right? The kids should learn proper english, writing and reading, and not simply a different language. That I agree with. But something is better than nothing.

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I have trouble seeing how a black child cannot understand Calculus through an English-speaking teacher, but can understand Calculus through an Ebonics-speaking teacher.

 

I might also not completely understand the "language" of Ebonics. Can someone give me some examples. Maybe some translations. I was under the impression it was the pronunciation of words such as "ask" as "aks", and including extra verbs such as "done". I understand that much of that is cultural and has been passed down through generations, but I obviously don't have a complete grasp on the language.

 

I can't fathom a student not learning Calculus because the teacher says "ask" instead of "aks" (or vice versa for that matter). Obviously I'm missing a crucial part of Ebonics.

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I have trouble seeing how a black child cannot understand Calculus through an English-speaking teacher, but can understand Calculus through an Ebonics-speaking teacher.

 

I might also not completely understand the "language" of Ebonics. Can someone give me some examples. Maybe some translations. I was under the impression it was the pronunciation of words such as "ask" as "aks", and including extra verbs such as "done". I understand that much of that is cultural and has been passed down through generations, but I obviously don't have a complete grasp on the language.

 

I can't fathom a student not learning Calculus because the teacher says "ask" instead of "aks" (or vice versa for that matter). Obviously I'm missing a crucial part of Ebonics.

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Well I dont think its necessarily an issue of a student being unable to learn it that way. Its just an attempt to get these kids to be interested in school. It sounds really stupid yes. And Calculus is probably a bad example. Perhaps the sciences are a better example. Teach the kids to take an interest in an interesting subject by expressing it to them in their terms. It seems to me right now, you throw a science textbook in their direction and only a lower percentage can compute the ideas being sent towards them because of the, for lack of a better term, language barrier. If you can get a higher percentage to compute whats being said, maybe more kids take an interest in the sciences. Then at the same time, you teach them proper English.

 

Ill admit its probably a stretch and may end up just making it difficult to teach them proper English. But I think people who tend to blast it are just misinterpreting what they are trying to do.

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...Great, now we can encourage people to speak like complete idiots and create an entire demographic of absolute morons. Where is Bill Cosby? He needs to crack down on this kind of horse crap.

 

I guess I should be more understanding considering English is such a difficult language to speak, especially for people born in America. It is hard to avoid slang overkill. Nope.

 

GET AN EDUCATION!

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Yo homies East side beat the West side crew in WWII.

 

Bill Clinton was caught boning that bitch white girl Monica.

 

:plain

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I be seeing dat somebodies bees brushin up on der history and political science :thumbup

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Thats more Jamaica than ebonics.

 

Reaslistically, Ebonics isn't a language. It's slang. Don't let some far out liberal in Cali tell you otherwise. Is speaking in slang bad? Not really. With friends and family. But not in school or in the real world. It's not kosher man.

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ebonics is a language as much as the spanish spoken by argentinians is a different language compared to the one spoken by cubans.

 

when you can engage in dialogue with a person and fully understand each other then you are speaking the same language. no ifs or buts about it.

 

strom thurmond spoke of a segregated but equal america. a bogus concept without a doubt. and this will only help segregate african americans through language. old strom would be proud.

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From what I've gathered, ebonics is less slang (using words such as "dawg" and "homie") and more of the pronunciation. As I said in a previous post, "ask" being pronounced "aks". "Usher" being pronounced "ersher", etc. This pronunciation is NOT brought on by a hip-hop crowd. Is passed down through generations of a culture.

 

I personally encourage such pronunciations, although I discourage the use of slang in a professional setting.

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From what I've gathered, ebonics is less slang (using words such as "dawg" and "homie") and more of the pronunciation. As I said in a previous post, "ask" being pronounced "aks". "Usher" being pronounced "ersher", etc. This pronunciation is NOT brought on by a hip-hop crowd. Is passed down through generations of a culture.

 

I personally encourage such pronunciations, although I discourage the use of slang in a professional setting.

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It's still slang because you and I are certainly not "dogs" no matter how it is spelled or pronounced.

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ebonics is a language as much as the spanish spoken by argentinians is a different language compared to the one spoken by cubans.

 

when you can engage in dialogue with a person and fully understand each other then you are speaking the same language. no ifs or buts about it.

 

strom thurmond spoke of a segregated but equal america. a bogus concept without a doubt. and this will only help segregate african americans through language. old strom would be proud.

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This is why I have a lot of respect for Bill Cosby. He realizes that African Americans as a whole keep themselves down and he pushes education and wants to stop the stereotype that to speak proper English is to speak "white". I have heard that excuse many times myself. It has nothing to do with being white. It is sad that so many basic concepts that are open to all humans have been segregated racially.

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From what I've gathered, ebonics is less slang (using words such as "dawg" and "homie") and more of the pronunciation.? As I said in a previous post, "ask" being pronounced "aks".? "Usher" being pronounced "ersher", etc.? This pronunciation is NOT brought on by a hip-hop crowd.? Is passed down through generations of a culture.

 

I personally encourage such pronunciations, although I discourage the use of slang in a professional setting.

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It's still slang because you and I are certainly not "dogs" no matter how it is spelled or pronounced.

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The whole point of my post was that I was under the assumption that such words as "dog" and "homie" were NOT slang, but rather pronunciation, and verb tenses and such. I used such examples as "aks". What I'm saying is that (under my assumption of ebonics) one would speak in a vague similarity to how slaves spoke ("master" = "massa", "I have cooked" = "I done cooked", "I am going to ask a question" = "Ima aks a question", etc.).

 

I specifically said that using words such as "dawg", "homey", "dime", etc. are NOT what I assume ebonics is made up of. That would be the product of the BET/MTV hip-hop culture.

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