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Marlins Built for 2009


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Marlins Built for 2009

 

By Josh Clinton

 

The 2009 season surely presents a lot of options to Admin Beinfest and the Florida Marlins.

 

With so many players eligible for arbitration heading into next year, the process to filter out next years 25-man roster is already underway. With 18 players going to arbitration entering the off-season, that number has already been reduced to 16.

 

Most notably, the release of once-thought top arm Sergio Mitre was the first move made in order to shape up the now nearly crystal clear pitching rotation. The only question regarding that rotation is who to move next.

 

With five spots in the rotation and six major-league ready arms waiting to fill the positions, Beinfest finds himself in his first of many quandaries.

 

Obvious locks for the top five in 2009 include Ricky Nolasco, Josh Johnson, and Chris Volstad. Nolasco, Florida?s ace, compiled 15 wins and 200-innings for the first time in his career. Johnson proved to be even more dominant in his incredible return from tommy-john than he previously displayed on the mound in his 2006 rookie campaign. Rookie phenom Volstad, who was Florida?s top draft choice in 2005, was arguably the Marlins best starter during the second half of 2008.

 

Past those three, though, it becomes much less clear. Vying for the last two remaining spots are Scott Olsen, Anibal Sanchez, and Andrew Miller.

 

Olsen, who was one of two Marlins to toss 200-innings this year, seems to be the best choice in terms of immediate success. Despite a disappointing 8-10 record, his durability and 4.20 ERA prove to be extremely valuable for a young left-hander only looking at an expected $2.5 Million salary next year. Still, that salary will play a role in his fate as a Marlin.

 

Sanchez is one of few Marlins that will not hit arbitration, which may be the only thing helping his chances of staying. While showing tremendous flashes of greatness, Sanchez has shown inconsistency on the mound in his short career. Both he and Olsen will garner extreme interest on the trade market, but because of his price, potential, and current relationship with Marlins management, Florida may be better off moving Sanchez if it expects to win in 2009.

 

It has been said that Miller will have to earn his spot in the rotation once again next season, but based on his massive potential and expensive price tag in comparison to the rest of the team, he is expected to open the season as the fifth starter.

 

In the bullpen, the only major subtraction should be former closer Kevin Gregg, who should command a decent return. Gregg is a strong arm most teams should strongly consider adding in a set-up role, as Matt Lindstrom is the heavy favorite to replace him next season.

 

What is clear is the direction in which Beinfest and owner Jeffrey Loria are planned on heading: pitching, speed, and defense. Small ball. The two phrases that were beaten to death heading into the 2003 season, but eventually landed the team in Yankee Stadium on the last day of the post-season, boasting an improbable world series championship victory against the most storied franchise in sports history.

 

For the last three seasons, the Marlins have shied away from a past that has consisted of gold-glove speedsters and fielded a team comprised of power bats with poor defense. I am certainly convinced this was not through choice, but because it was the best talent that presented itself to Beinfest in his worst straped-for-cash off-season.

 

Now, through raising those inexpensive kids into a talent pool of current and future All-Stars, he has once again put himself in a position to build a championship-caliber ball club.

 

No position player seems to be safe this off-season, outside of super star Hanley Ramirez.

Dan Uggla is one player you?d think may be safe, at least with the three seasons he has cemented in Florida. But after a year in which he finished second-to-last in errors among national league second basemen, the team may be willing to part ways with one of baseball?s top bats at the position since Rogers Hornsby. This becomes increasingly likely when taken into account that the Marlins? top position prospect is second baseman Chris Coghlan, who is considered major-league ready by some scouts.

 

One of three Marlins that knocked 30 homers out in 2008, Mike Jacobs, may also be a coin-toss to return. Expected to take in the largest arbitration figure outside of Uggla, the first-baseman could potentially be replaced by as many as four players within the organization (Jorge Cantu, Dallas McPherson, Gaby Sanchez, and Logan Morrison).

 

Outfielders Josh Willingham and Jeremy Hermida remain on the hot seat as well.

 

Willingham, while one of the Marlins most consistent threats when healthy, has clearly become a health risk in left field. A looming aching back kept him out of 50 games in 2008, and clearly affected his performance when available. The one thing keeping him clearly in the mix, however, is plate discipline. Willingham fits the offensive mold of former Marlins such as Jeff Conine, Mike Lowell, and Derrek Lee, three All-Stars that have posted very similar numbers in Florida, and could also be an outside option at first-base.

 

While Beinfest would like to give Hermida one more year to finally grow into the super star he was clearly destined to be, it may be time to part ways with the left-handed hitter. A minor-league stud, he has never lived up to the potential he showed in his first career at-bat that resulted in a pinch-hit grand slam in 2005. The only thing that may keep Hermida in right field heading into the 2009 season could be damage that will occur to the front offices ego for boasting him as the next J.D. Drew. It will hurt even more if that ends up happening in another city next year.

 

There is no doubt the Marlins have options, and more than any other franchise heading into winter. The only question is if these options will be exercised correctly. The good news is, when dealing with the kind of talent these still young Marlins have, receiving equal talent in return will be far from an issue.

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I hate it that Hermida will have to be starter just because of all the hype that this front office gave him, even though he sucks. Damn man, just get rid of the man already, I'll take Willingham, if he gives us what he showed in the first 2 months of the season

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Marlins Built for 2009

 

By Josh Clinton

 

The 2009 season surely presents a lot of options to Admin Beinfest and the Florida Marlins.

 

With so many players eligible for arbitration heading into next year, the process to filter out next years 25-man roster is already underway. With 18 players going to arbitration entering the off-season, that number has already been reduced to 16.

 

Most notably, the release of once-thought top arm Sergio Mitre was the first move made in order to shape up the now nearly crystal clear pitching rotation. The only question regarding that rotation is who to move next.

 

With five spots in the rotation and six major-league ready arms waiting to fill the positions, Beinfest finds himself in his first of many quandaries.

 

Obvious locks for the top five in 2009 include Ricky Nolasco, Josh Johnson, and Chris Volstad. Nolasco, Florida?s ace, compiled 15 wins and 200-innings for the first time in his career. Johnson proved to be even more dominant in his incredible return from tommy-john than he previously displayed on the mound in his 2006 rookie campaign. Rookie phenom Volstad, who was Florida?s top draft choice in 2005, was arguably the Marlins best starter during the second half of 2008.

 

Past those three, though, it becomes much less clear. Vying for the last two remaining spots are Scott Olsen, Anibal Sanchez, and Andrew Miller.

 

Olsen, who was one of two Marlins to toss 200-innings this year, seems to be the best choice in terms of immediate success. Despite a disappointing 8-10 record, his durability and 4.20 ERA prove to be extremely valuable for a young left-hander only looking at an expected $2.5 Million salary next year. Still, that salary will play a role in his fate as a Marlin.

 

Sanchez is one of few Marlins that will not hit arbitration, which may be the only thing helping his chances of staying. While showing tremendous flashes of greatness, Sanchez has shown inconsistency on the mound in his short career. Both he and Olsen will garner extreme interest on the trade market, but because of his price, potential, and current relationship with Marlins management, Florida may be better off moving Sanchez if it expects to win in 2009.

 

It has been said that Miller will have to earn his spot in the rotation once again next season, but based on his massive potential and expensive price tag in comparison to the rest of the team, he is expected to open the season as the fifth starter.

 

In the bullpen, the only major subtraction should be former closer Kevin Gregg, who should command a decent return. Gregg is a strong arm most teams should strongly consider adding in a set-up role, as Matt Lindstrom is the heavy favorite to replace him next season.

 

What is clear is the direction in which Beinfest and owner Jeffrey Loria are planned on heading: pitching, speed, and defense. Small ball. The two phrases that were beaten to death heading into the 2003 season, but eventually landed the team in Yankee Stadium on the last day of the post-season, boasting an improbable world series championship victory against the most storied franchise in sports history.

 

For the last three seasons, the Marlins have shied away from a past that has consisted of gold-glove speedsters and fielded a team comprised of power bats with poor defense. I am certainly convinced this was not through choice, but because it was the best talent that presented itself to Beinfest in his worst straped-for-cash off-season.

 

Now, through raising those inexpensive kids into a talent pool of current and future All-Stars, he has once again put himself in a position to build a championship-caliber ball club.

 

No position player seems to be safe this off-season, outside of super star Hanley Ramirez.

Dan Uggla is one player you?d think may be safe, at least with the three seasons he has cemented in Florida. But after a year in which he finished second-to-last in errors among national league second basemen, the team may be willing to part ways with one of baseball?s top bats at the position since Rogers Hornsby. This becomes increasingly likely when taken into account that the Marlins? top position prospect is second baseman Chris Coghlan, who is considered major-league ready by some scouts.

 

One of three Marlins that knocked 30 homers out in 2008, Mike Jacobs, may also be a coin-toss to return. Expected to take in the largest arbitration figure outside of Uggla, the first-baseman could potentially be replaced by as many as four players within the organization (Jorge Cantu, Dallas McPherson, Gaby Sanchez, and Logan Morrison).

 

Outfielders Josh Willingham and Jeremy Hermida remain on the hot seat as well.

 

Willingham, while one of the Marlins most consistent threats when healthy, has clearly become a health risk in left field. A looming aching back kept him out of 50 games in 2008, and clearly affected his performance when available. The one thing keeping him clearly in the mix, however, is plate discipline. Willingham fits the offensive mold of former Marlins such as Jeff Conine, Mike Lowell, and Derrek Lee, three All-Stars that have posted very similar numbers in Florida, and could also be an outside option at first-base.

 

While Beinfest would like to give Hermida one more year to finally grow into the super star he was clearly destined to be, it may be time to part ways with the left-handed hitter. A minor-league stud, he has never lived up to the potential he showed in his first career at-bat that resulted in a pinch-hit grand slam in 2005. The only thing that may keep Hermida in right field heading into the 2009 season could be damage that will occur to the front offices ego for boasting him as the next J.D. Drew. It will hurt even more if that ends up happening in another city next year.

 

There is no doubt the Marlins have options, and more than any other franchise heading into winter. The only question is if these options will be exercised correctly. The good news is, when dealing with the kind of talent these still young Marlins have, receiving equal talent in return will be far from an issue.

I think Josh Clinton has been reading my postings he has detailed just about all my previously expressed thoughts...Can I sue for plagiarism?

Gotta go guys, gonna see my attorny...

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While Beinfest would like to give Hermida one more year to finally grow into the super star he was clearly destined to be, it may be time to part ways with the left-handed hitter. A minor-league stud, he has never lived up to the potential he showed in his first career at-bat that resulted in a pinch-hit grand slam in 2005. The only thing that may keep Hermida in right field heading into the 2009 season could be damage that will occur to the front offices ego for boasting him as the next J.D. Drew. It will hurt even more if that ends up happening in another city next year.

Anyone want to guess what JD Drew hit at age 24?

 

.242/.340/.424

 

Lets toss that kid.

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While Beinfest would like to give Hermida one more year to finally grow into the super star he was clearly destined to be, it may be time to part ways with the left-handed hitter. A minor-league stud, he has never lived up to the potential he showed in his first career at-bat that resulted in a pinch-hit grand slam in 2005. The only thing that may keep Hermida in right field heading into the 2009 season could be damage that will occur to the front offices ego for boasting him as the next J.D. Drew. It will hurt even more if that ends up happening in another city next year.

Anyone want to guess what JD Drew hit at age 24?

 

.242/.340/.424

 

Lets toss that kid.

 

Great point... Which is why I believe Hermida should be kept. In fact, I would keep Hermida and Ross, and trade Willingham. Worst case scenario you end up with Ross in left and Hermida in right on opening day. Best case, you have a nice platoon between the two in right until Hermida can prove himself consistent.

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While Beinfest would like to give Hermida one more year to finally grow into the super star he was clearly destined to be, it may be time to part ways with the left-handed hitter. A minor-league stud, he has never lived up to the potential he showed in his first career at-bat that resulted in a pinch-hit grand slam in 2005. The only thing that may keep Hermida in right field heading into the 2009 season could be damage that will occur to the front offices ego for boasting him as the next J.D. Drew. It will hurt even more if that ends up happening in another city next year.

Anyone want to guess what JD Drew hit at age 24?

 

.242/.340/.424

 

Lets toss that kid.

 

 

whats so great about jd drew. yeah he walks alot but thats about all hes done in his eleven year career. hes only had one 100 rbi season and one 93 rbi season. comparing hermida to drew does not give me much hope for hermida either

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While Beinfest would like to give Hermida one more year to finally grow into the super star he was clearly destined to be, it may be time to part ways with the left-handed hitter. A minor-league stud, he has never lived up to the potential he showed in his first career at-bat that resulted in a pinch-hit grand slam in 2005. The only thing that may keep Hermida in right field heading into the 2009 season could be damage that will occur to the front offices ego for boasting him as the next J.D. Drew. It will hurt even more if that ends up happening in another city next year.

Anyone want to guess what JD Drew hit at age 24?

 

.242/.340/.424

 

Lets toss that kid.

 

 

whats so great about jd drew. yeah he walks alot but thats about all hes done in his eleven year career. hes only had one 100 rbi season and one 93 rbi season. comparing hermida to drew does not give me much hope for hermida either

So there is nothing about a career .284/.392/.502 hitter that you kinda like?

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whats so great about jd drew. yeah he walks alot but thats about all hes done in his eleven year career. hes only had one 100 rbi season and one 93 rbi season. comparing hermida to drew does not give me much hope for hermida either

.894 career OPS, but like. Whatever! RBIIIIIIIS. :thumbdown

 

 

 

OPS has to be one of the most overrated stats on this site

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whats so great about jd drew. yeah he walks alot but thats about all hes done in his eleven year career. hes only had one 100 rbi season and one 93 rbi season. comparing hermida to drew does not give me much hope for hermida either

.894 career OPS, but like. Whatever! RBIIIIIIIS. :thumbdown

 

 

 

OPS has to be one of the most overrated stats on this site

I am just going to assume you typo'd RBI.

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whats so great about jd drew. yeah he walks alot but thats about all hes done in his eleven year career. hes only had one 100 rbi season and one 93 rbi season. comparing hermida to drew does not give me much hope for hermida either

.894 career OPS, but like. Whatever! RBIIIIIIIS. :thumbdown

 

 

 

OPS has to be one of the most overrated stats on this site

I am just going to assume you typo'd RBI.

 

 

no, I believe the most important stat to base a hitter on is his OBP, not his OPS

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whats so great about jd drew. yeah he walks alot but thats about all hes done in his eleven year career. hes only had one 100 rbi season and one 93 rbi season. comparing hermida to drew does not give me much hope for hermida either

.894 career OPS, but like. Whatever! RBIIIIIIIS. :thumbdown

 

 

 

OPS has to be one of the most overrated stats on this site

 

You know what... you're right!

 

Let's use EqA, GPA and WPA instead!

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whats so great about jd drew. yeah he walks alot but thats about all hes done in his eleven year career. hes only had one 100 rbi season and one 93 rbi season. comparing hermida to drew does not give me much hope for hermida either

.894 career OPS, but like. Whatever! RBIIIIIIIS. :thumbdown

 

 

 

OPS has to be one of the most overrated stats on this site

 

There's a reason OPS exists...

 

So hitters like Mike Jacobs can't go around bragging about their great sluggling % without being held accountable for their terrible on-base %.

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whats so great about jd drew. yeah he walks alot but thats about all hes done in his eleven year career. hes only had one 100 rbi season and one 93 rbi season. comparing hermida to drew does not give me much hope for hermida either

.894 career OPS, but like. Whatever! RBIIIIIIIS. :thumbdown

 

 

 

OPS has to be one of the most overrated stats on this site

I am just going to assume you typo'd RBI.

 

 

no, I believe the most important stat to base a hitter on is his OBP, not his OPS

 

OBP is a function of OPS... :banghead

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.894 career OPS, but like. Whatever! RBIIIIIIIS. :thumbdown

 

 

 

OPS has to be one of the most overrated stats on this site

I am just going to assume you typo'd RBI.

 

 

no, I believe the most important stat to base a hitter on is his OBP, not his OPS

 

OBP is a function of OPS... :banghead

 

 

obviously, but when u account for SLG %, that just boosts a bad players #'s, such as a Mike Jacobs kind of player

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whats so great about jd drew. yeah he walks alot but thats about all hes done in his eleven year career. hes only had one 100 rbi season and one 93 rbi season. comparing hermida to drew does not give me much hope for hermida either

.894 career OPS, but like. Whatever! RBIIIIIIIS. :thumbdown

 

 

 

OPS has to be one of the most overrated stats on this site

:|

 

no, I believe the most important stat to base a hitter on is his OBP, not his OPS

:| :| :|

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whats so great about jd drew. yeah he walks alot but thats about all hes done in his eleven year career. hes only had one 100 rbi season and one 93 rbi season. comparing hermida to drew does not give me much hope for hermida either

.894 career OPS, but like. Whatever! RBIIIIIIIS. :thumbdown

 

 

 

OPS has to be one of the most overrated stats on this site

:|

 

no, I believe the most important stat to base a hitter on is his OBP, not his OPS

:| :|

 

:|

 

 

I understand that OBP+SLG % is a players OPS, but that basically goes into the point that both SLG % and OPS are overrated. OPS's are more misleading than SLG % imo. People see SLG as just a sign of a power hitter, and don't think much of that stat, but when people see a high OPS, they immediately think a superstar

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Just like if u were going to base a single's hitter such as Ichiro on OPS, u would consider him a terrible player

 

Not really... because there are two flaws with your argument...

 

A) You'd realize you were talking about Ichiro... statements are all about context

B) Ichiro's high BAs boost his OBP to reasonable levels, also, Ichiro has slugged over .420 quite few times and OPS'd in the .750-.800 range a lot as well

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:|

 

 

I understand that OBP+SLG % is a players OPS, but that basically goes into the point that both SLG % and OPS are overrated. OPS's are more misleading than SLG % imo. People see SLG as just a sign of a power hitter, and don't think much of that stat, but when people see a high OPS, they immediately think a superstar

You have to know when not to look at OPS when you're trying to determine what kind of hitter a guy is. Take Mike Jacobs for example. Slugs a lot, doesn't walk, bad OPS. If you looked at his career OPS+, you'd think he's worthless when that simply isn't the case.

 

So in the case of free swinging sluggers, I agree with you. But other than that, you're wrong.

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obviously, but when u account for SLG %, that just boosts a bad players #'s, such as a Mike Jacobs kind of player

Yeah, I do agree with you there. OPS is flawed, which is one reason I don't use it much anymore and show OPS SLG and OBP separately.

 

I also don't use EqA because I think it underrates SLG.

 

But to call OPS more overrated than...

 

Win-Loss

Batting Average

RBI

HR

Strikeouts (for a batter)

Strikeouts (arguably for a pitcher)

Arguably ERA

Stolen Bases

 

...s quite ridiculous.

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